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No. 17 Washington clamps down on Matt Fink, holds off No. 21 USC for big Pac-12 win

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No. 17 Washington was trending toward falling in the same old hole they did in a loss to Cal earlier this season, with big drops, lackluster red zone trips and a number of blown assignments holding back the Huskies from taking full control of a pivotal Pac-12 contest. Luckily tailback Salvon Ahmed was back in the lineup and proved to be fully healthy in breaking off a game-breaking 89 yard touchdown run that all but cemented their eventual 28-14 win over No. 21 USC on Saturday afternoon.

Ahmed wound up finishing with 153 yards on the day in his return to action after missing last week’s win over BYU, helping pace an offense that was solid but unspectacular in a situation where they simply didn’t execute up to a level you expect out of a Chris Petersen-coached team. A lot of that had to do with several overthrows and drops in the passing game, which was far from crisp on an otherwise perfect fall day on Montlake. QB Jacob Eason recorded only 180 yards on 16 completions and failed to find the end zone through the air.

Richard Newton chipped in with 20 yards and a score of his own on the ground, while wideout Andre Baccellia complemented two catches for 13 yards by falling on a fumble in the end zone for a big score late in the first half. The Huskies did move into the red zone two other times but had to settle for a pair of Peyton Henry field goals otherwise the final score could have been a lot more comfortable for the purple and gold.

The outcome probably wasn’t too surprising for those that follow the Trojans given how beat up the team was coming in. Matt Fink started for the first time on the road at quarterback in place of Kedon Slovis, who reportedly travelled to Seattle but didn’t play after suffering a concussion last week in the win against Utah. The veteran quarterback had a few moments where he flashed (one long TD pass to Michael Pittmanone scramble for a rushing score) but far more where he didn’t (163 yards passing, three bad interceptions that led to points the other way) against one of the league’s best defenses.

The end result dropped USC to 3-2 on the year, which somehow still allows them to stay in the thick of the Pac-12 South race but makes life difficult overall for head coach Clay Helton. The team heads into their off week with plenty of questions beyond the quarterback position and still has to travel to South Bend to face a Notre Dame squad in the top 10. The loss to the Huskies only further cements the head coach’s spot on the hot seat and the number of penalties and defensive lapses are enough to cause many in the cardinal and gold pining for a change being made sooner rather than later.

As for Washington, they’ll hit the road as well the next few weeks against Stanford and Arizona as that battle with No. 13 Oregon looms in the middle of next month as possibly the game of the year in the Pac-12 North.

Florida State’s Mike Norvell to take 25% pay cut

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Less than a year into his job, the Florida State head football coach is the latest to be impacted by the coronavirus pandemic.

This past week, FSU announced a series of cost-saving measures within the athletic department.  Included in that is Mike Norvell, the new Florida State football coach who will take a 25-percent cut in his salary for the fiscal year.  Other coaches for the Seminoles, including men’s and women’s basketball, will take 15-percent cuts.  Athletic director David Coburn will see his salary reduced by 20 percent.

Additionally, 25 full-time jobs within the athletic department are being eliminated.  Overall, that department’s budget will be slashed by 20 percent.

”I am personally heartbroken over the impact this pandemic has had on our employees, and I am disappointed I must give you this discouraging news today,” Coburn said in a portion of his statement. “However, I am sure you have seen that other athletic departments around the country  are also making reductions.”

On that front, the FSU athletic director is absolutely correct.

Below is a partial list of FBS programs that have initiated various cost-cutting measures for athletic department personnel, including coaches:

Additionally, Pac-12 commissioner Larry Scott, who reportedly made north of $5 million a year ago, is taking a 20% pay cut.  Scott’s Big 12 counterpart, Bob Bowlsby, announced pay cuts for himself and the conference’s staff.

College Football in Coronavirus Quarantine: On this day in CFT history, including the family of Joe Paterno, Penn State reacting to the release of the Freeh report

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The sports world, including college football, had essentially screeched to a halt in the spring as countries around the world battled the coronavirus pandemic. As such, there was a dearth of college football news as the sport went into a COVID-induced hibernation.  Slowly, though, the game is coming back to life.  Hopefully.

That being said, we thought it might be fun to go back through the CollegeFootballTalk archives that stretch back to 2009 and take a peek at what transpired in the sport on this date.

So, without further ado — ok, one further ado — here’s what happened in college football on July 12, by way of our team of CFT writers both past and present.

(P.S.: If any of our readers have ideas on posts they’d like to read during this college football hiatus, leave your suggestions in the comments section.  Mailbag, maybe?)

2019

THE HEADLINE: FCS player paralyzed vs. Georgia moves into wheelchair-accessible home
THE SYNOPSIS: All things considered, the Devon Gales saga, one four years in the making, was one of the feel-good stories of last offseason.

2018

THE HEADLINE: Report: Paul Finebaum to sign new contract with ESPN
THE SYNOPSIS: Two years later, the College Football Mouth of the South could see his life played out in a television sitcomSeriously.

2017

THE HEADLINE: Kevin Sumlin downplays hot seat in College Station: “I’m feeling the same pressure I feel all of the time”
THE SYNOPSIS: Four months later, Sumlin was kicked to the curb by the Aggies.  Now the head coach at Arizona, Sumlin finished 51-26 with the Aggies in the hyper-competitive SEC West.

2016

THE HEADLINE: Court documents: 14-year-old boy told Joe Paterno of sexual abuse in 1976
THE SYNOPSIS: “I wish I had done more.” JoePa’s own words in the wake of the Jerry Sandusky child rape scandal.  That was our lede for this post then.  And those words, even now, should never, ever be forgotten when it comes to discussing the Penn State head coach’s legacy.

2015

THE HEADLINE: FSU’s Dalvin Cook cited last year for chaining three puppies together
THE SYNOPSIS: It was a bad few days for Cook specifically and Florida State in general.  In addition to abhorrent puppy abuse, Cook was alleged to have punched a woman in the face at a bar. In a different incident in a different bar, teammate and quarterback Deandre Johnson was dismissed after punching a different woman in the face.  Cook was ultimately found not guilty by a jury in his bar incident.

2014

THE HEADLINE: Jameis Winston adds fuel to ‘two more years’ fire
THE SYNOPSIS: Six months later, and after just one more year in Tallahassee, the Florida State quarterback left early for the 2015 NFL Draft.

2012

THE HEADLINE: Freeh Report investigating Penn State’s actions in Jerry Sandusky case released
THE SYNOPSIS: The family of Joe Paterno accepted criticism of the late coach in the report.  The university stated that they are “giving the report careful scrutiny and consideration before making any announcements or recommendations.” As we said above: “I wish I had done more.”

2011

THE HEADLINE: Man takes part in ‘O-H-I-O’ — from his casket
THE SYNOPSIS: My family is overflowing with diehard Ohio State fans.  This is their favorite O-H-I-O ever.  Still.  And there are standing orders to perform one as part of their funerals.

Maryland latest to put coronavirus-related halt to voluntary football workouts

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We can officially add Maryland to the growing list of football programs hitting the workout pause button.

As with other schools in the Big Ten, Maryland welcomed back student-athletes, including football players, to campus for voluntary workouts last month.  Saturday, those workouts for Terrapins across several sports have come to a halt.

The suspension came as a result of an increase in positive tests for COVID-19.  The school didn’t specify the number of Maryland football players involved.  Below is the university’s release:

Maryland Athletics, as part of a gradual, phased approach to the return of student-athletes to campus, is working with the University Health Center to conduct regular COVID-19 testing. In preparation for this ongoing testing period, we worked with State, county and university health officials to develop appropriate protocols in the event of positive test results, including education, contact identification and tracing, and self-isolation.

On July 7-8, the University Health Center conducted on-campus screening of 185 student-athletes and staff; nine individuals tested positive for COVID-19. These nine student-athletes and staff have been notified and are currently in self-isolation, monitored by university health officials. Contact tracing is ongoing through the Prince George’s County Health Department and all identified individuals will follow a mandated 14-day self-observation period, under the supervision of university health officials. Under guidance from the Prince George’s County Health Department, we have temporarily suspended voluntary, individual training for the football program.

In previous testing of 105 individuals in June, no individual tested positive for COVID-19.

Maryland football is the latest but certainly not the first impacted by the pandemic.  Or the last, more than likely.

Just last week, Ohio State announced and North Carolina confirmed they were putting a temporary halt to voluntary workouts because of the results of recent COVID-19 testing among its student-athletes. July 3, Kansas was the latest FBS program to pause voluntary workouts after 12 players tested positive for COVID-19.  Earlier in that same week, Arizona announced that it was pausing its phased return of student-athletes to campus.  Prior to that, eight individuals connected to the Boise State football program tested positive, forcing the school to temporarily scuttle workouts.  June 20, K-State announced that it is pausing all voluntary workouts as well.  The reason?  “[A] total of 14 student-athletes have tested positive for active COVID-19 following PCR (polymerase chain reaction) testing of more than 130 student-athletes.” The weekend before that, Houston decided to put a halt to voluntary on-campus workouts after six symptomatic UH student-athletes tested positive for COVID-19.

Other programs have seen a high number of players test positive but continue workouts.  Among those are Clemson (37 players tested positive), LSU (30 players quarantined), Texas (13 confirmed positives for football players) and Texas Tech (23 positives for players/staffers).

Colorado LB Jashua Allen tosses name into the transfer portal

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Colorado football has already seen one portal reversal this offseason.  They are now hoping for another change of heart.  Maybe?

Earlier this offseason, Sam Noyer took the first step in leaving the Colorado football team by placing his name into the NCAA transfer database.  In early April, the quarterback pulled his name from the portal and remained with the Buffaloes.

Three months later, 247Sports.com is reporting that Jash Allen has entered the portal as well.  While the linebacker didn’t confirm the news specifically, he did retweet reports of his impending departure.

Now, for what’s seemingly becoming a daily disclaimer when it comes to transfers.

As we’ve stated myriad times in the past, a player can remove his name from the portal and remain at the same school. At this point, though, other programs are permitted to contact a player without receiving permission from his current football program.

NCAA bylaws also permit schools to pull a portal entrant’s scholarship at the end of the semester in which he entered it.

Allen began his collegiate career at the JUCO level.  In 2019, he was a four-star member of the Colorado football recruiting class that cycle.

His first season with the Buffs, Allen played in 10 games.  Most of that action came on special teams, although he did appear in three games on defense.  In that limited action on the defensive side of the ball, he was credited with four tackles and two quarterback pressures.  His official CU profile also notes he had “four special teams points on the season, one tackle inside the 20, one first down field and one knockdown or springing block on kick return.”

Allen will be leaving the Pac-12 school as a graduate.