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College Football Coronavirus Quarantine: On this day in CFT history

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The sports world, including college football, has essentially screeched to a halt as countries around the world battle the coronavirus pandemic. As such, there’s a dearth of college football news as spring practices have all but been canceled at every level of the sport. And there’s even some concern that the health issue could have an impact on the 2020 college football campaign.

In that vein, we thought it might be fun to go back through the CollegeFootballTalk archives and take a peek at what transpired in the sport on this date.

So, without further ado — ok, one further ado — here’s what happened in college football on March 24, by way of our team of CFT writers both past and present.

(P.S.: If any of our readers have ideas on posts they’d like to read during this hiatus, leave your suggestions in the comments section.  Mailbag, maybe?)

2019

THE HEADLINE: Georgia Tech DT Brandon Adams dies
THE SYNOPSIS: Just 21 years old, the defensive lineman died after he collapsed while practicing “step dancing” with friends, hitting his head on the pavement as he fell backwards. It was subsequently reported that “after going into convulsions, he began to foam at the mouth.”

THE HEADLINE: Georgia early enrollee arrested on disorderly conduct charge
THE SYNOPSIS: Tyrique Stevenson was a five-star member of Georgia’s 2019 recruiting class who was the third Bulldog player arrested in a month. As a true freshman, the defensive back played in all 14 games and was the team’s co-winner as Defensive Newcomer of the Year.

2018

THE HEADLINE: In addition to Notre Dame series, Alabama reportedly working on home-and-home with Texas, too
THE SYNOPSIS: Earlier in the day, it was reported that an Alabama-Notre Dame home-and-home was potentially in the works. One month later, that series was confirmed. Two months later, the Alabama-Texas home-and-home was officially announced.

2016

THE HEADLINE: Kentucky signee stabbed six times in weekend incident
THE SYNOPSIS: Jordan Bonner, at home visiting his infant son in a Cleveland (OH) suburb, was stabbed six times in the chest, abdomen and back by an individual who was subsequently arrested and charged with aggravated assault. The charges were eventually dropped as both individuals claimed self-defense. The linebacker recovered from his injuries and went on to play in 11 games as a true freshman.

THE HEADLINE: Nick Saban named one of Fortune’s ‘World’s Greatest Leaders’
THE SYNOPSIS: The Alabama head coach came in at No. 11 on the 50-person list, ahead of the likes of U2 frontman and philanthropist Bono (No. 14), Blackrock CEO Larry Fink (No. 21), Girl Scouts CEO Anna Maria Chavez (No. 24), Argentine president Maurizio Macri  (No. 26), the first women to graduate from Ranger School (No. 34), the heads of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (No. 41) and Canadian prime minister Justin Trudeau (No. 48).

2015

THE HEADLINE: Surprise! The NCAA went out of bounds on Reggie Bush investigation
THE SYNOPSIS: How ’bout we pick that NCAA scab one more time, Trojan Nation? Not much else to do.

2013

THE HEADLINE: Marshawn Lynch scores TD in Cal spring game
THE SYNOPSIS: A Seattle Seahawks running back at the time, the Cal legend “scored” from 22 yards out as he scampered into the end zone untouched. “We told the guys if anybody tackled him, it was going to be a $25 million fine,” then-head coach Sonny Dykes said at the time. “I didn’t want to be getting a call from Pete (Carroll, Lynch’s NFL coach).

2012

THE HEADLINE: Texas A&M AD on Big 12: ‘I regret that it is coming to an end’
THE SYNOPSIS: A&M’s athletic director at the time, Bill Byrne, may have “regretted” the Aggies’ move to the SEC at the time, but the school’s bank account sure wasn’t. And still isn’t.

2011

THE HEADLINE: Air Force pilots in Ohio State-Iowa flyover flap punished
THE SYNOPSIS: Four Air Force pilots in T-38 fighter jets buzzed Kinnick Stadium in a planned flyover following the playing of the national anthem for the Ohio State-Iowa game Nov. 20 the year before. The only problem? Per regulations, the jets were supposed to be at least 1,000 feet above ground level as they flew over the stadium. As it turns out, they weren’t even close to hitting that mark.

2010

THE HEADLINE: Black recruits urged to avoid Gamecocks
THE SYNOPSIS: Members of the black community in the Palmetto State — including legislators — urged football recruits to stay away from the University of South Carolina. Why? Because the school’s board of trustees was about to lose its lone African-American member.

2009

THE HEADLINE: PAC-10 HIRES HEAD OF WOMEN’S TENNIS TOUR AS COMMISH
THE SYNOPSIS: Larry Scott officially replaced Tom Hansen as the commissioner of the Conference Formerly Known as the Pac-10 on this date. To the bewilderment and/or angst of some, Scott’s remains in his post 11 years later. How much longer his tenure lasts, though, is to be determined.

(*Yes, back in the day, we used to scream out our headlines at our readers in all-caps. The move to NBC a couple of months later ended that practice.)

Pandemic-related restrictions force Western Michigan to schedule a new season-opening opponent

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The coronavirus pandemic has already impacted the 2020 season for Western Michigan football.

Western Michigan was scheduled to open the upcoming football season against Colgate on Sept. 4.  However, the Patriot League, Colgate’s conference, mandated late last month that all of its member schools not be permitted to travel by air or stay overnight in another locale.  As the distance between Hamilton, NY, to Kalamazoo, Mich., is nine-plus hours, that opener was certainly in jeopardy.

This week, Western Michigan confirmed that it will now open the 2020 college football season against Stony Brook.  The game will still be played Sept. 4 at Waldo Stadium, the football home of the Broncos.

“We are looking forward to opening the 2020 season with Stony Brook,” WMU head coach Tim Lester said in a statement. “We know coronavirus has changed, and will keep changing, how we operate this season. We will continue to operate with an abundance of caution for the safety and well-being of our student-athletes, staff members, fans and WMU community.”

It should be noted that Syracuse is also supposed to open its home schedule Sept. 19 against Colgate.  It’s unclear if that game will be played, although distance certainly isn’t as much of an issue as it was for Western Michigan.

WMU is coming off a second consecutive 7-6 season under Lester, who will be entering his fourth season with the Broncos.  That 2019 campaign also included narrowly missing out on a berth in the MAC championship game.

Injuries force Oklahoma State starting LT Dylan Galloway to retire

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The Oklahoma State football depth chart has seen its offensive line take a significant hit.  But, hey at least it’s not some of the other headlines the school has seen of late.

In a text message to SI.com this week, Dylan Galloway revealed that he has decided to retire from the sport due to injuries. The offensive lineman has dealt with multiple shoulder injuries the past couple of seasons as well as a right leg injury last season.

Galloway will be leaving the Oklahoma State football team and Stillwater as a graduate.

“I’m done with football,” Galloway told the website. “I was getting hurt so much and I felt like all of my injuries were piling up to where they were effecting me too much on and off the field.”

Galloway was a three-star member of the Oklahoma State football Class of 2016.  As a redshirt, the Dallas native took a redshirt.

All told, Galloway played in 31 games during his time with the Cowboys.  He started five games at left tackle in 2018 and another nine this past season.  The 6-5, 297-pound lineman missed three games in 2019 because of the injury to his right leg.

As noted by SI.com, “[t]he Preseason Athlon’s College Football Preview has Galloway listed as second-team All-Big 12.”

Toledo reportedly hires ex-Michigan State assistant Mark Staten

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Toledo is the new home for a former Michigan State football assistant.  Reportedly.

When Mel Tucker took over for Mark Dantonio earlier this month, the former Colorado head coach retained just two of his predecessor’s assistants, Mike Tressel and Ron Burton.  Two other former Dantonio assistants, Terrence Samuel and Paul Haynes, took jobs at UNLV and Minnesota, respectively.

This week, it’s being reported that a third former Dantonio assistant has landed on his coaching feet as Mark Staten is now a member of the Toledo football staff.  Staten is expected to coach tight ends and offensive tackles for the Rockets.

Interestingly, Michigan State is set to host Toledo on Sept. 19 of the college football season.

If the hiring comes to fruition, it will mark the first time since 2003 that Staten is not part of a Dantonio-led coaching staff.  From 2004-06, Staten was at Cincinnati.  He spent the past 13 seasons at MSU.  From 2007-10, Staten coached tight ends and offensive tackles for the Spartans.  Staten moved to offensive line coach in 2011, a position he held until 2018.  Amidst a reshuffling of Dantonio’s offensive staff, Staten became tight ends coach for the 2019 season.

Prior to Michigan State and Cincinnati, Staten had served as a graduate assistant at Ohio State (2002-03) and Miami of Ohio (2001).

Kansas is the latest to hit the coronavirus-related pause button on workouts as a dozen Jayhawks test positive for COVID-19

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Go ahead and add Kansas to the growing list of football programs hitting the workout pause button.

The Big 12 announced back in May that student-athletes could begin returning to campus June 15 for voluntary workouts.  Kansas was one of those football programs in the conference to take advantage of the edict.  Nearly three weeks later, however, KU has announced that it’s suspending those workouts.  The reason?  A dozen Jayhawk football players tested positive for COVID-19.  Less than a week ago, just three were positives.

“Due to the positives within our own program and the increased cases in our region including our student-athletes’ home communities, we believe all football student-athletes and staff should self-quarantine for 14-days,” the school stated in a release.  After the 14 days, all players and staff will be tested again.

Below are statements from the Kansas athletic director and its head football coach.

Jeff Long
After the increase in positive COVID-19 tests within our football program, our medical team at Kansas Team Health has recommended discontinuing voluntary workouts immediately. Our priority remains to keep our student-athletes safe and healthy, especially during this pandemic, and will follow the recommendations of our medical professionals.

“We will only resume our preparations after the 14-day quarantine is complete and our student-athletes and staff have been tested for the virus prior to participating in football activities. In the meantime, we continue to educate our student-athletes, as well as coaches and staff, on the importance of following the policies and procedures and recommendations from our Kansas Team Health physicians and the CDC.

Les Miles
When we welcomed our young men back to campus a couple of weeks ago for voluntary workouts, even with the policies and procedures in place to try and protect them from becoming infected with the virus, events outside of our control has made the decision to pause these workouts necessary. Our trainers and doctors will remain in daily contact with each of the student-athletes that tested positive to support them and what we hope will involve only minor symptoms if any. We will follow medical recommendations on returning to activities.

Kansas football is the latest but certainly not the first impacted by the pandemic.  Or the last, more than likely

Early this past week, Arizona announced that it was pausing its phased return of student-athletes to campus.  Prior to that, eight individuals connected to the Boise State football program tested positive, forcing the school to temporarily scuttle workouts.  June 20, K-State announced that it is pausing all voluntary workouts as well.  The reason?  “[A] total of 14 student-athletes have tested positive for active COVID-19 following PCR (polymerase chain reaction) testing of more than 130 student-athletes.” The weekend before that, Houston decided to put a halt to voluntary on-campus workouts after six symptomatic UH student-athletes tested positive for COVID-19.

Other programs have seen a high number of players test positive but continue workouts.  Among those are Clemson (37 players tested positive), LSU (30 players quarantined), Texas (13 confirmed positives for football players) and Texas Tech (23 positives for players/staffers).