A.J. McCarron

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Cam Newton could become third QB with college, Super Bowl title

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A little over five years ago, Auburn — behind Heisman-winning quarterback Cam Newton — beat Oregon in the BCS Championship. Two weeks from now, Newton will have an opportunity to join a list that currently is only populated by Joe Namath and Joe Montana.

Namath (Alabama, New York Jets) and Montana (Notre Dame, San Francisco 49ers) are the only two quarterbacks in football history to start for a college football champion and win a Super Bowl. Newton would be the third.

Of course, guys like Tom Brady and Ken Stabler were backups at Michigan and Alabama, respectively, and went on to win a Super Bowl (in Brady’s case, Super Bowls) as a pro. Troy Aikman started for part of Oklahoma’s 1985 championship team, but was injured in October and missed the Sooners’ last push to a title. Joe Flacco lost the 2007 FCS Championship to Appalachian State, while Steve Young (BYU) and Peyton Manning (Tennessee) both left college a year before their schools won championships.

College football’s recent quarterback champions don’t lend a ton of hope that anyone will join Namath, Montana and potentially Newton anytime soon. Jameis Winston has the best chance, and A.J. McCarron started for Cincinnati after Andy Dalton got hurt.

But consider the list of quarterbacks to win a college title since 2000: Josh Heupel (now Mizzou’s offensive coordinator), Ken Dorsey (now Newton’s QB coach with the Panthers), Craig Krenzel (now a motivational speaker and founded an insurance company), Matt Mauck (who’s a dentist), Matt Leinart (who’s now a talking head for FOX Sports), Vince Young (who has a steakhouse in Austin and was arrested for DWI on Monday), Chris Leak (who’s a staffer with the Buccaneers), Matt Flynn (who most recently was the Saints’ backup), Tim Tebow (now a talking head for ESPN), Greg McElroy (now a talking head — and an underrated one — for ESPN), Newton, McCarron, Winston, Cardale Jones (who’s turning pro this year) and Jacob Coker (who’s collegiate eligibility is up).

Derrick Henry joins an even more exclusive fraternity with Heisman Trophy win

Kelly Kline/Heisman Trust via AP
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When Alabama running back Derrick Henry was named the winner of the 2015 Heisman Trophy Saturday night in New York City, the Crimson Tide star joined the exclusive fraternity of Heisman Trophy winners. This is often referred to as the most exclusive fraternity in sports, as only one player per year is inducted into the club every season since 1935. But Henry joined an even more exclusive club in college football history with his Heisman Trophy win by becoming the 22nd player to win each of the three major individual awards in college football; the Heisman Trophy, Maxwell Award and Walter Camp Player of the Year.

USC’s O.J. Simpson was the first player to win all three major awards in the same season, doing so in 1968. Simpson actually prevented UCLA’s Gary Beban from being the first triple crown award winner in college football when he was named the inaugural Walter Camp Award winner in 1967. Beban won the Heisman Trophy and the Maxwell Award that season. Stanford’s Jim Plunkett became the second player to sweep the three individual honors in 1970, and Penn State’s John Cappelletti swept the awards in 1973.

Henry is the fourth player from the SEC to win all three major awards, joining Georgia’s Herschel Walker, Florida’s Danny Wuerffel and Auburn’s Cam Newton. Henry is also the first running back to pull off the feat since Wisconsin’s Ron Dayne took all three honors in 1999. Ricky Williams of Texas did it the previous season in 1998 as well. Oregon quarterback Marcus Mariota won all three individual awards last season as well. Alabama’s A.J. McCarron prevented Florida State’s Jameis Winston from winning all three awards by being named the Maxwell Award winner in 2013. Alabama’s last Heisman Trophy winner before Henry, Mark Ingram in 2009, actually prevented Texas quarterback Colt McCoy from pulling off the triple award feat. McCoy won the Maxwell Award and Walter Camp Player of the Year awards in that 2009 season.

Players to win Heisman Trophy, Maxwell Award and Walter Camp Player of the Year in Same Season

  • O.J. Simpson, USC (1968)
  • Jim Plunkett, Stanford (1970)
  • John Cappelletti, Penn State (1973)
  • Archie Griffin, Ohio State (1975)
  • Tony Dorsett, Pittsburgh (1976)
  • Charles White, USC (1979)
  • Marcus Allen, USC (1981)
  • Herschel Walker, Georgia (1982)
  • Mike Rozier, Nebraska (1983)
  • Doug Flutie, Boston College (1984)
  • Vinny Testaverde, Miami (1986)
  • Barry Sanders, Oklahoma State (1988)
  • Desmond Howard, Michigan (1991)
  • Gino Torretta, Miami (1992)
  • Charlie Ward, Florida State (1993)
  • Eddie Georgia, Ohio State (1995)
  • Danny Wuerffel, Florida (1996)
  • Ricky Williams, Texas (1998)
  • Ron Dayne, Wisconsin (1999)
  • Cam Newton, Auburn (2010)
  • Marcus Mariota, Oregon (2014)
  • Derrick Henry, Alabama (2015)

College Football Awards Recap: Derrick Henry named Maxwell Award and Doak Walker winner

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Alabama running back Derrick Henry had a big night at the 2015 Home Depot College Football Awards Show in Atlanta Thursday. The two Heisman finalists walked away with some of the top honors of the night, with Henry being named the Maxwell Award and Walter Camp Player o the Year winner and the Doak Walker Award winner as the nation’s best running back.

Henry became the first running back to win the Maxwell Award since 2002 when Penn State’s Larry Johnson won the award. He is the second player from Alabama to win the award in the past three seasons, joining quarterback A.J. McCarron in 2013. McCarron was Alabama’s first Maxwell Award winner. Earlier in the evening, prior to the award show, Henry was also named the Walter Camp Player of the Year, giving Henry three individual awards by the end of the night.

Henry was not the only Heisman finalist to take home some hardware Thursday night. Clemson quarterback Deshaun Watson was named the Davey O’Brien Award winner as the nation’s top quarterback. The Davey O’Brien Award winner has gone on to win the Heisman Trophy each of the past five seasons and all but one season since 2006. Stanford’ Christian MCaffrey was up for a handful of honors but did not take any awards home.

Maxwell Award (Player of te Year): Derrick Henry, Alabama

Bednarik Award (Best Defensive Player): Tyler Matakevich, Temple

Davey O’Brien Award (Best QB): Deshaun Watson, Clemson

Biletnikoff Award (Best WR): Corey Coleman, Baylor

Doak Walker Award (Best RB): Derrick Henry, Alabama

Rimington Trophy (Best C): Ryan Kelly, Alabama

John Mackey Award (Best TE): Hunter Henry, Arkansas

Outland Trophy (Interior Lineman): Joshua Garnett, Stanford

Jim Thorpe Award (Best DB): Desmond King, Iowa

Ray Guy Award (Best P): Tom Hackett, Utah

Lou Groza Award (Best K): Ka’imi Fairbairn, UCLA

Home Depot Coach of the Year: Dabo Swinney, Clemson

Disney Spirit Award: Hank Goff, Concordia University, St. Paul

Contributions to College Football Award: Barry Switzer, Oklahoma