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UTSA’s Jeff Traylor to take a 10% cut in his pay

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UTSA is now included in the burgeoning list of college football coaches taking a pandemic-induced salary slashing.

In a letter to donors Tuesday, the San Antonio Express-News reported, it was revealed that the Conference USA school’s “athletic department implemented a 10% salary reduction for the program’s highest-paid coaches and senior staff to combat a six-figure loss this fiscal year due to the coronavirus pandemic.” Included in that, of course, is UTSA head football coach Jeff Traylor.

Traylor was hired as the new coach of the Roadrunners last December.  His predecessor, Frank Wilson, was paid $1.125 million in 2019.

“As we work through the planning process, additional cost-savings measures may very well be needed in the coming months and in the year ahead,” athletic director Lisa Campos wrote in the letter. “Although the pandemic has created unprecedented challenges and budget uncertainty, I remain optimistic about our community’s resilience and the future of UTSA Athletics.”

UTSA is the second Conference USA school to initiate such a cut.  Western Kentucky was the first.

Below is a partial list of FBS programs that have initiated various cost-cutting measures for athletic department personnel, including coaches:

Additionally, Pac-12 commissioner Larry Scott, who reportedly made north of $5 million a year ago, is taking a 20% pay cut.  Scott’s Big 12 counterpart, Bob Bowlsby, announced pay cuts for himself and the conference’s staff.

TCU’s Gary Patterson latest coach to take voluntary pay cut

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Go ahead and add TCU to the burgeoning list of college football coaches doing their part financially amidst the coronavirus pandemic.

While there is no press release yet from the Big 12 school, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram is reporting that the university “has reduced the salaries of several coaches and administrators within the athletic department.”  Included in that group, of course, is TCU head football coach Gary Patterson.

Neither the size nor the duration of the pay cut was divulged.

According to the USA Today coaches salary database, Patterson was paid just over $4.9 million last year.  That figure was four among Big 12 head coaches.

In addition to Patterson, men’s basketball coach Jamie Dixon, baseball coach Jim Schlossnagle and athletic director Jeremiah Donati have taken what were described as voluntary pay cuts.  Also, the Star-Telegram noted, offensive coordinator/quarterbacks coach Sonny Cumbie, defensive coordinator/linebackers coach Chad Glasgow, offensive line coach Jarrett Anderson and defensive line coach Dan Sharp did the same.

“I am extremely proud that our coaches stepped up and made these voluntary pay cuts,” Donati told the newspaper in a texted statement. “They truly understand the environment we, and so many others, are in. It really shows their commitment to TCU.”

TCU is the fifth Big 12 school known to have made such cuts.  The others are Iowa State, Kansas, Kansas State and West Virginia.

Below is a partial list of FBS programs that have initiated various cost-cutting measures for athletic department personnel, including coaches:

Additionally, Pac-12 commissioner Larry Scott, who reportedly made north of $5 million a year ago, is taking a 20% pay cut.  Scott’s Big 12 counterpart, Bob Bowlsby, announced pay cuts for himself and the conference’s staff.

Western Michigan head coach Tim Lester to take a 25% cut in pay

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The Western Michigan head football coach is set to take a financial hit. And a bigger hit than those that have come before him.

WMU revealed Monday that the athletic department will make cuts in its budget that will total in excess of $6 million because of the coronavirus pandemic.  As part of that cost-reduction measure, Western Michigan head football coach Tim Lester will take a 25% cut in pay.

Out of all the FBS schools to announce salary reductions, Lester’s is easily the largest.

Lester made $800,000 in 2019 according to the USA Today coaching salary database.  If the reduction were to last an entire year, the coach would lose $200,000.

Lester’s coaching staff will take a similar pay cut as well.

“We have done an extensive review in all of the areas we do. Our revenue, our expenses, what comes in from the NCAA,” athletic director Kathy Beauregard said. “Our world kind of changed, so not only did we have the normal university reductions, but also not a lot of ability to receive the resources that we were getting from the NCAA, from the MAC and from the different revenue sources that we had.

Western Michigan is the second MAC school to make such a cut.  The other is Northern Illinois.

Below is a partial list of FBS programs that have initiated various cost-cutting measures for athletic department personnel, including coaches:

Additionally, Pac-12 commissioner Larry Scott, who reportedly made north of $5 million a year ago, is taking a 20% pay cut.  Scott’s Big 12 counterpart, Bob Bowlsby, announced pay cuts for himself and the conference’s staff.

Mark Emmert, conferences don’t appear to be on same page when it comes to sports being played without students on campus

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Imagine that, inconsistency when it comes to something involving the NCAA.

in mid-April, the College Football Playoff Management Committee, which consists of the 10 FBS commissioners as well as Notre Dame athletic director Jack Swarbrick, made it clear that if there are no students on campus there would be no sports. “Our players are students. If we’re not in college, we’re not having contests,” Big 12 commissioner Bob Bowlsby stated at the time.

Friday, NCAA president Mark Emmert reiterated that stance.

“All of the commissioners and every president that I’ve talked to is in clear agreement: If you don’t have students on campus, you don’t have student-athletes on campus,” Emmert said during an interview on the official NCAA Twitter account. “That doesn’t mean [the school] has to be up and running in the full normal model, but you have to treat the health and well-being of the athletes at least as much as the regular students. … If a school doesn’t reopen, then they’re not going to be playing sports. It’s really that simple.”

The only problem with that?  Bowlsby contradicted that stance — and his own stance of a month ago — in speaking to The Stadium‘s Brett McMurphy.

“Going to class in an online sense is satisfactory,” the commissioner said when discussing the return of college sports. “There’s room for that to happen. School has to be in session, student-athletes have to be going to class.”

Bowlsby further expounded on the online-only aspect as it relates to sports in an interview with WVMetroNews.

School has to be in session because football players on college teams are student-athletes. You have to be going to college. That doesn’t necessarily mean that if the new normal becomes online education, in part or in whole, that football players or volleyball players or soccer players couldn’t be taking classes online just like the rest of the students.

“I suspect some institutions may be a hundred percent online. And if they are, and if that is also what student-athletes are doing, I think that meets the criteria.

Even Swarbrick allowed earlier this month that Notre Dame football players could return to campus ahead of the rest of the student body if in-person classes for the fall are approved.

One area of consensus among all concerned is that, if college football is played this season, it will be much different.  As in, you won’t see packed stadiums right away.

“Just because there’s some regulation that’s been lifted doesn’t mean that automatically means you should immediately put 105,000 fans in a football stadium,” Emmert said in his interview. “I think that the proper thing to do and the sensible thing to do is a phased approach. It’s plausible to me that early in the season, let’s just stick with football, you see a very limited fan access, but by later in the season, as things develop, hopefully in a very positive way, you all of sudden can see larger fan bases attending.”

Wisconsin’s Paul Chryst to take temporary 15% reduction in pay

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Go ahead and add the Wisconsin head football coach to the burgeoning list of athletics officials taking a financial hit.

The university Saturday morning announced that the athletics department “intends to implement a compensation and work reduction plan to include most of its employees in an effort to manage financial challenges brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic.” As one of Wisconsin athletics’ highest-earning employees, football coach Paul Chryst will take a 15% reduction in pay over the next six months.

According to the USA Today coaches salary database, Chryst made $4.15 million in 2019.  That figure was ninth in the Big Ten.

UW athletic director Barry Alvarez and head men’s basketball coach Greg Gard will take the same 15% pay cut.

“Reducing compensation and work hours is obviously not something I want to see for any of our Badger Athletics family,” Alvarez said in a statement. “But we are facing the same financial challenges that other organizations across the country are. We are working hard to minimize the impact on our employees while responding to the realities of the situation created by the pandemic.

“I greatly appreciate our highest earners’ willingness to consider voluntarily accepting a temporary reduction in pay, as well as the rest of our staff who are sharing in this exercise by reducing their hours to help us navigate our way through these unprecedented times.”

Wisconsin is the fourth Big Ten school to make such a cut.  The others are Michigan, Minnesota and Rutgers.

Below is a partial list of FBS programs that have initiated various cost-cutting measures for athletic department personnel, including coaches:

Additionally, Pac-12 commissioner Larry Scott, who reportedly made north of $5 million a year ago, is taking a 20% pay cut.  Scott’s Big 12 counterpart, Bob Bowlsby, announced pay cuts for himself and the conference’s staff.