Chris Doyle

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College Football amidst Coronavirus Pandemic: On this day in CFT history, including Notre Dame coaching legend Ara Parseghian dies at 94

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The sports world, including college football, had essentially screeched to a halt in the spring as countries around the world battled the coronavirus pandemic. As such, there was a dearth of college football news as the sport went into a COVID-induced hibernation.  Slowly, though, the game is coming back to life.  Hopefully.

That being said, we thought it might be fun to go back through the CollegeFootballTalk archives that stretch back to 2009 and take a peek at what transpired in the sport on this date.

So, without further ado — ok, one further ado — here’s what happened in college football on August 2, by way of our team of CFT writers both past and present.

(P.S.: If any of our readers have ideas on posts they’d like to read during this college football down-time, leave your suggestions in the comments section.  Mailbag, maybe?)

2019

THE HEADLINE: Iowa strength coach Chris Doyle remains highest-paid in the country with pay bump to $800K
THE SYNOPSIS: Less than a year later, amidst controversy, Doyle and the Hawkeyes “parted ways.”

2018

THE HEADLINE: Four-star Nebraska signee Maurice Washington cleared academically
THE SYNOPSIS: If only this was the end of his off-field journey.  Yeah, not even close.

2017

THE HEADLINE: Notre Dame mourns the passing of Ara Parseghian
THE SYNOPSIS: In 11 seasons with Parseghian as head coach, the Fighting Irish went 95-17-4 and won two national championships, 1966 and 1973.  The College Football Hall of Famer was 94 at the time of his passing.

2016

THE HEADLINE: Ohio State sits atop AP’s Top 100 poll of all-time college football programs
THE SYNOPSIS: The Associated Press put together a list that was based on total poll appearances, number of times ranked No. 1 and bonuses for AP national championships.  The Top Five, outside of OSU? Oklahoma, Notre Dame, Alabama and USC at Nos. 2-5.

2014

THE HEADLINE: Big House sets U.S. soccer attendance mark
THE SYNOPSIS: For some reason, this post eclipsed the century mark in the comments section.  And, if I remember correctly, it would’ve been twice the century mark if not for the myriad comments I had to delete.

2014

THE HEADLINE: Nebraska still has 1,000 student tickets for a lousy home schedule
THE SYNOPSIS: Of course, all of those tickets were ultimately gobbled up.  The Cornhuskers currently hold the record for the longest sellout streak in college football history at 375.  That streak dates all the way back to 1962.  NU, though, might have to play loose with numbers if that streak is to continue amidst the pandemic.

2011

THE HEADLINE: Applebee’s serves as neighborhood bar and battle ground for UT-OU knife fight
THE SYNOPSIS: The Red River Shootout’s slogan?  “Fightin’ Good in the Neighborhood.”

2010

THE HEADLINE: Vandy drops ‘interim’ from HC Robbie Caldwell’s title
THE SYNOPSIS: Cladwell earned just for introducing “turkey inseminating crew” into the college football lexicon.

Investigation into Iowa football found ‘the program’s rules perpetuated racial or cultural biases and diminished the value of cultural diversity’

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The Iowa football program’s culture has suffered from racial bias against Black players and bullying by a small number of current and former coaches, according to an investigation report released Thursday.  University of Iowa President Bruce Harreld said the report by an outside law firm shows that the “climate and culture must and will change within our football program.”

“Our student-athletes must have the ability to be true to themselves, and we cannot and will not tolerate a systemic process that inhibits authenticity,” Harreld said in a statement.

Coach Kirk Ferentz, the longest-tenured head coach in college football, appears likely to keep his job, however. The report found that many players believe he has already made several positive changes in recent weeks.

Ferentz and athletic director Gary Barta were scheduled to hold a news conference later Thursday.

The university hired the Husch Blackwell law firm in June to review the program after dozens of former players, most of them Black, spoke out on social media to allege racial disparities and mistreatment.

In addition to a public report summarizing the findings, the firm provided the university with four confidential personnel reports on current and former staff who were accused of mistreating players. Harreld said the university will address the allegations against those coaches, who were not publicly identified.

Last month, the university cut ties with longtime strength and conditioning coach Chris Doyle, awarding him a $1.1 million severance agreement. Several players had cited Doyle as the major source of their mistreatment, an allegation he has denied.

But the review found the cultural problems went well beyond Doyle.

Investigators found that many current and former Black players felt unhappy and unwelcome in the program, where the ideal player “was built around the stereotype of a clean-cut, white athlete from a midwestern background.” They described an environment in “which a small number of coaches felt empowered to bully and demean athletes, especially Black athletes,” the report found.

“In sum, the program’s rules perpetuated racial or cultural biases and diminished the value of cultural diversity,” the report concludes. “The program over-monitored players to the point that they experienced heightened anxiety and maintained a culture that allowed a small group of coaches to demean players.”

For the complete report, click HERE.