Denzel Mims

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No. 6 Oklahoma hopes 5th straight Big 12 title will be enough for 3rd straight Playoff berth

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In the first four years since his hiring, Oklahoma rode Lincoln Riley‘s offense to four Big 12 championships. The No. 6 Sooners made it a perfect 5-for-5 on Saturday, but this time they overcame their offense and leaned on their defense to hold off a resilient No. 7 Baylor, 30-23 in overtime.

The Sooners blew two 10-point leads, endured two Jalen Hurts turnovers, knocked Baylor’s top two quarterbacks out of the game only to see the third stringer rally the Bears to overtime, but the Sooners’ defense forced three incompletions and a sack in the extra frame to preserve the win.

Oklahoma (12-1, 9-1 Big 12), who has won on a league-best 13 championships — all of them coming in the past 20 seasons — and five consecutive, will now turn its attention to Atlanta, where a No. 2 LSU win over No. 4 Georgia likely sends the crimson and cream to the College Football Playoff for the fourth time in Riley’s five seasons and three consecutive.

But before Oklahoma could think about the Playoff, the Sooners first had to win this game.

After a pair of punts to open the game, CeeDee Lamb — who missed OU’s epic comeback in Waco last month — announced his presence with a 71-yard reception, taking the ball from OU’s 22-yard line to the Baylor 7. Kennedy Brooks provided the Sooners’ only first half touchdown two plays later with a 6-yard rush.

The Sooner defense then forced a three-and-out and again pushed into the Bear red zone, but a third down sack by James Lockhart forced a 44-yard Gabe Brkic field goal.

Baylor’s offense continued struggling after falling behind 10-0, as their next two possessions failed to gain a single yard. However, the Bear defense stiffened, and James Lynch forced a fumble while sacking Jalen Hurts, which BU’s Terrel Bernard recovered at the Oklahoma 29. Baylor again struggled to move forward, gaining just three yards, but the field position allowed John Mayers to get Baylor on the board with a 44-yard field goal at the 10:20 mark of the second quarter.

The Bears then forced a punt on OU’s third consecutive possession, and backup quarterback Gerry Bohanon checked into the game after Charlie Brewer exited to be evaluated for a possible head injury. Bohanon and Jon Lovett combined to register Baylor’s first first down in a quarter and a half, but the Bears gained just one and punted on a 4th-and-14 from the OU 45.

That punt put Baylor’s offense back on the field — its defense. As Hurts threw to Lee Morris, Morris slipped and Jordan Williams snared it for the Bears, returning the ball to the OU 23. After a sack and an incompletion, Bohanon’s stat line read seven total touches for minus-5 yards. So, naturally, he threw a 33-yard strike to Tyquan Thornton on 3rd-and-20 to tie the game with 2:59 left in the first half.

The touchdown was Baylor’s first since the 11:02 mark of the second quarter… of the first Baylor-OU game, ending a streak of 12 straight drives that ended shy of the end zone.

Now facing its own scoring drought, Oklahoma went three-and-out, as its possession was derailed when Lynch again sacked Hurts for a 7-yard loss on 2nd-and-2. A 39-yard punt gave Baylor the ball at its own 47 with 1:22 left in the first half, and Bohanon converted another 3rd-and-long by throwing a 29-yard moonshot to Thornton, turning a 3rd-and-11 at the OU 40 into a 1st-and-10 at the 11 with 29 seconds left, and a 28-yard Mayers field goal gave Baylor, at that point the owner of all of 98 yards of total offense, a 13-10 lead halftime lead.

Oklahoma began the second half much the way it started the first. The defense forced a three-and-out, and the offense went 63 yards to set up a tying 24-yard Brkic field goal. The play before the field goal was one of those you immediately marked with an asterisk: after calling timeout, Riley dialed up a QB draw on 3rd-and-8, which did not achieve the line to gain.

Still, Oklahoma forced yet another three-and-out on Baylor’s next touch, and then the Sooners took the lead at the 7:53 mark of the third quarter with an 18-yard Nick Basquine catch (his first since 2016) to cap an 8-play, 74-yard drive. Yet another Baylor punt later, Oklahoma pushed its lead to 10 with a 24-yard Brkic field goal. With its lead at 23-13 with 10:31 to play in the fourth quarter, Oklahoma had control of the game, but they had not put it away.

Having gained all of 13 second half yards at that point, Baylor pulled Bohanon for third-string quarterback Jacob Zeno, and that move immediately paid off when his first pass found Trestan Ebner for an 81-yard catch-and-run score, bring the Bears back within 23-20 with 9:41 remaining. As fitting with this game’s character, a team that gained 111 yards in the first three quarters out of nowhere connected on the longest touchdown pass in Big 12 Championship history.

Oklahoma moved 31 yards on its next touch but again failed to put the game away, as Riley elected to punt on 4th-and-7 from the Baylor 44 with 6:11 to go. He would immediately regret the decision.

After a Bears offensive lineman was caught downfield, negating an 18-yard connection to Denzel Mims, Zeno hit Chris Platt for a 78-yard catch-and-run, moving the ball from his own 5 to OU’s 17. While Brewer and Bohanon went 7-of-21 for 71 yards, Zeno to that point was 2-of-2 for 159 yards. His third pass, though, sailed wide of Platt on 3rd-and-3, and forcing a 27-yard Mayers field goal.

A game that Oklahoma led 10-0 just over 10 minutes in and 23-13 seven minutes prior was now tied at 23 with 3:25 remaining.

A 31-yard rollout pass to Lamb overcame a holding call and pushed the ball from OU’s 15 to near midfield, but Lamb could not corral a 3rd-and-3 pass with 1:14 to go, and Riley elected to punt rather than risk giving Baylor the ball inside Sooner territory. Reeves Mundschau‘s punt rolled all the way to the Baylor 1 and the game went to overtime.

Baylor won the toss, and Oklahoma scored in three plays. A face mask of Lamb moved the ball to Baylor’s 11, a Hurts run pushed it to the 5, and Rhamondre Stevenson did the rest on a patented OU GT pull.

Oklahoma’s defense dominated the extra frame. After incomplete passes on 1st- and 2nd-and-10, the Sooners sacked Zeno on third down, then forced a hurried incompletion on 4th-and-20 to secure the win.

OU dominated the game everywhere but the scoreboard. The Sooners out-gained Baylor 433-265 and limited the Bears to just eight first downs, 3-of-15 on third down, and its three quarterbacks to just nine completions on 26 attempts. In fact, outside of Zeno’s 81- and 78-yarders and Bohanon’s 33-yarder, Baylor was 6-of-23 for 38 yards through the air. The Bears were also credited with 35 rushing yards on 29 attempts, including sacks. Meaning, outside of those three long completions, Baylor gained 71 yards on 52 plays.

For Oklahoma, Hurts went 17-of-24 for 287 yards with a touchdown and an interception while rushing for 38 yards on 23 carries. Brooks rushed for 59 yards on 17 carries and Stevenson totaled 48 yards on eight attempts; both players scored touchdowns. Lamb caught eight passes for 173 yards.

No. 14 Baylor clinches first trip to Big 12 Championship by flattening Texas

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Baylor saw its hopes of making its first College Football Playoff trip — such that they ever existed in the first place, seeing as the Bears were 9-0 and ranked 13th — dashed in a 31-3 crimson and cream avalanche last week. That was obviously disappointing, but the Bears woke up Sunday morning with this reality: they, a team that went 7-6 last year and 1-11 a year ago, could clinch a trip to their first Big 12 title game by beating hated Texas at home this Saturday. That reality was still pretty good.

No. 14 Baylor’s ferocious defense — last week’s second half notwithstanding — flattened an obviously broken Texas offense, and the Bears booked a trip to Arlington with a convincing 24-10 win on Saturday.

In fact, Baylor was a single play away from shutting out Texas for the first time since 1980. After Baylor punted the ball to Texas’ 2-yard line with 18 seconds left in the first half, the Bears’ defenders clearly expected their counterparts to concede a 7-0 halftime deficit. Instead, Keontay Ingram ripped off a 68-yard run, allowing Cameron Dicker to kick a 48-yard field goal on the final play of the first half.

That proved to be a solitary highlight for Texas’ offense. The Longhorns punted seven times, turned it over on downs once and threw one interception, as Sam Ehlinger went just 22-of-37 for 200 yards and the pick, all while taking numerous hits both inside and outside the pocket. Even Ingram did next to nothing after the 68-yard run; outside of that play, he went for just 18 yards on six carries. Daniel Young added a 4-yard touchdown run with one second left in the game.

On offense, Denzel Mims proved to be the difference, catching seven passes for 125 yards and the clinching touchdown, putting Baylor up 21-3 with 1:20 to go in the third quarter. Jon Lovett put Baylor up early with a 28-yard touchdown run on the first play of the second quarter, and Charlie Brewer called his own number, leaping in for a 1-yard score to give the Bears a 14-3 lead with 7:36 to go in the third quarter.

The one concerning takeaway from the game is that Brewer (16-of-25 for 221 yards; 18 carries for 75 yards) left the game after taking a blow to the head with 13:22 to go in the fourth quarter. He was taken to the injury tent and then to Baylor’s locker room and did not return. Whether that was an injury precaution or a legitimate injury remains to be seen. Either way, Baylor can now officially rest its junior quarterback next week at Kansas to prepare for its first trip to the conference championship.

Baylor won Big 12 championships in 2013 and ’14, but the Big 12 did not stage a title game in those years. So while the Bears will make their first Big 12 Championship appearance at AT&T Stadium on Dec. 7, their (overwhelmingly likely) opponent, Oklahoma, will be there for the 11th time, including all three since the game was revived in 2017.

The win snaps a 4-game losing streak in the series for Baylor and hands the Bears their 27th victory over the Longhorns 109 tries.

No. 10 Oklahoma mounts program-record 25-point comeback to snap No. 13 Baylor’s 11-game winning streak

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The offense was scoring at will and the defense was making life hell for Jalen Hurts, and for a time No. 13 Baylor seemed like a safe bet to rocket up the rankings, leading No. 10 Oklahoma 28-3 early in the second quarter on Saturday night. But Oklahoma’s offense, like a Ferrari so many times under head coach Lincoln Riley, instead became a tank, plowing right through the Bears’ defense with drive after drive after drive.

In fact, after trailing by 25, Oklahoma ran 72 plays for 351 yards while its defense pitched a second-half shoutout, and the Sooners came back to win, 34-31. The 25-point rally is the largest in Oklahoma history.

Playing without All-American wide receiver CeeDee Lamb, the Sooners leaned on Hurts and the running game, overcoming three Hurts turnovers in the process, as the quarterback threw for 297 yards and four touchdowns and rushed for 114 more. Most importantly, the Sooners snapped the ball 95 times and held the ball for 40:46, limiting Baylor to just 16 plays after halftime.

Oklahoma forced a Baylor punt to open the game and, taking over at their own 47, quickly moved into the red zone, but Hurts was sacked on a 3rd-and-5 and the Sooners settled for a 39-yard Gabe Brkic field goal.

Charlie Brewer had Denzel Mims streaking wide open for what would have been a 78-yard touchdown on the first play of the ensuing drive, but skipped the ball to him. It didn’t matter. He hit Mims for 11 yards on the next snap, kicking off a 78-yard touchdown drive that Brewer himself capped with a 2-yard keeper.

After forcing one of the rarer sights in college football — an Oklahoma three-and-out — Baylor went up 14-3 on a 30-yard connection that missed earlier, as Mims got about as open as a receiver can get on a 30-yard fade route.

Facing an uncharacteristic 14-3 deficit, Oklahoma added to its own misery with a pair of Hurts turnovers. The first came deep in his own territory, when the quarterback placed the ball on the ground in an attempt to steady himself and simply lost the ball, which Terrel Bernard recovered for Baylor at the OU 27. Brewer kept for 23 yards on the final play of the first quarter, then added the final four on the first snap of the second.

On Oklahoma’s next possession, the Sooners reached the Baylor 36 when Grayland Arnold stepped in front of a Hurts pass and returned it 71 yards to the OU 9, where he was finally tackled by Hurts himself. A second Brewer-to-Mims scoring strike put Baylor up 28-3 at the 11:02 mark of the second quarter, and putting the Sooners on the wrong end of a 48-3 run dating back to the fourth quarter of the Iowa State game.

Oklahoma finally stopped the bleeding with an un-OU like 14-play, 75-yard, near 6-minute drive, one that was extended when a 4th-and-5 incompletion at the Bears’ 33 was wiped away due to defensive holding by Baylor’s Jameson Houston. Hurts’ 5-yard pass to Austin Stogner made the score 28-10 with 5:06 left in the first half.

Baylor answered the Sooners’ prolonged drive with one of its own, moving 61 yards in 13 plays, but stalling at the the OU 11 as the Bears settled for a 28-yard John Mayers field goal with three seconds left before halftime.

Oklahoma accepted the ball to open the second half and rumbled down the field, moving 74 yards in a deliberate 12 plays, consuming 5:44 of clock, as Stogner’s second short touchdown catch cut the deficit to 31-17.

Baylor’s offense picked up right where it left off as JaMycal Hasty broke free for a 32-yard run into Sooner territory, but he forced the ball out of his own hands and OU’s Pat Fields grabbed the bouncing pigskin, giving the Sooners’ their first takeaway since their win over Texas Tech way back on Sept. 28. Led largely by the ground game, and the ground game led largely by Hurts, Oklahoma moved all the way to the Baylor 4 on a 2nd-and-goal play when Baylor’s James Lynch knocked the ball from Hurts’ hands and recovered it in the end zone, keeping the score at 31-17 with three Hurts turnovers serving as the difference.

The Bears, though, went three-and-out and Oklahoma mounted another long drive, this time going 90 yards over 13 plays and 4:59, and a 19-yard grab by Theo Wease pulled OU within 31-24.

When Baylor’s offense stepped on the field at its own 22 after the ensuing kickoff, the Bears had run all of four second half plays to Oklahoma’s 36, gaining 38 yards to OU’s 215. Baylor desperately needed a drive and they didn’t get one, as a Tyquan Thornton drop on 3rd-and-9 doomed the Bears to a second consecutive three-and-out.

Oklahoma took over at its own 23, but by that point it didn’t matter where the Sooners got the ball. The drive could have started in Norman and Baylor’s once-fierce, now-gassed defense still wouldn’t have stopped them. This time, OU went 77 yards over 13 snaps and 6:01, tying the game with 5:25 to play on a 2-yard lob from Hurts to Brayden Willis (plus a Brkic PAT).

Needing a drive even more than they did last time, Baylor got one first down (thanks to pass interference against Mims) but could not get another as Brewer threw incomplete on 2nd- and 3rd-and-11 and Oklahoma, which trailed 28-3 early in the second quarter, took the ball at their own 27 with 4:15 to play and a chance to take the lead. Oklahoma got its lead, but it wasn’t a knockout blow. This drive totaled just eight plays and 59 yards, stalling at the Baylor 14 and resulting in a 31-yard Brkic field goal, the true freshman’s 12th make in as many tries as a Sooner, to put Oklahoma back in front for the first time since leading 3-0 early in the first quarter.

Trailing 34-31 with 1:45 to go, Baylor quickly moved to the Oklahoma 40, but Brewer was nearly intercepted by Sooner linebacker Nic Bonitto on 2nd-and-10 and then was intercepted by Bonitto on 3rd-and-10, completing the second half shutout and the record comeback.

With the loss, Baylor’s 11-game winning streak and its surprise College Football Playoff hopes are now history, but the Bears (9-1, 6-1 Big 12) can still forge a rematch with OU (9-1, 6-1 Big 12) in the Big 12 Championship.

No. 13 Baylor takes huge lead over No. 10 Oklahoma to locker room

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Charlie Brewer has out Jalen Hurts-ed Jalen Hurts, making plays with his arm and his feet, while Hurts has committed two turnovers that led to two Baylor touchdowns. As a result, No. 13 Baylor holds a stunning 31-10 lead over No. 10 Oklahoma at the half in Waco.

Oklahoma forced a Baylor punt to open the game and, taking over at their own 47, quickly moved into the red zone, but Jalen Hurts was sacked on a 3rd-and-5 and the Sooners settled for a 39-yard Gabe Brkic field goal.

Charlie Brewer had Denzel Mims streaking wide open for what would have been a 78-yard touchdown on the first play of the ensuing drive, but skipped the ball to him. It didn’t matter. He hit Mims for 11 yards on the next snap, kicking off a 78-yard touchdown drive that Brewer himself capped with a 2-yard keeper.

After forcing one of the rarer sights in college football — an Oklahoma three-and-out — Baylor went up 14-3 on a 30-yard connection that missed earlier, as Mims got about as open as a receiver can get on a 30-yard fade route.

Facing an uncharacteristic 14-3 deficit, Oklahoma added to its own misery with a pair of Hurts turnovers. The first came deep in his own territory, when the quarterback placed the ball on the ground in an attempt to steady himself and simply lost the ball, which Terrel Bernard recovered for Baylor at the OU 27. Brewer kept for 23 yards on the final play of the first quarter, then added the final four on the first snap of the second.

On Oklahoma’s next possession, the Sooners reached the Baylor 36 when Grayland Arnold stepped in front of a Hurts pass and returned it 71 yards to the OU 9, where he was finally tackled by Hurts himself. A second Brewer-to-Mims scoring strike put Baylor up 28-3 at the 11:02 mark of the second quarter, and putting the Sooners on the wrong end of a 48-3 run dating back to the fourth quarter of the Iowa State game.

Oklahoma finally stopped the bleeding with an un-OU like 14-play, 75-yard, near 6-minute drive, one that was extended when a 4th-and-5 incompletion at the Bears’ 33 was wiped away due to defensive holding by Baylor’s Jameson Houston. Hurts’ 5-yard pass to Austin Stogner made the score 28-10 with 5:06 left in the first half. He closed the half 8-of-14 for 80 yards with a touchdown and an interception while rushing 12 times for 26 yards with a fumble.

Baylor answered the Sooners’ prolonged drive with one of its own, moving 61 yards in 13 plays, but stalling at the the OU 11 as the Bears settled for a 28-yard John Mayers field goal with three seconds left before halftime.

Brewer finished the half 13-of-18 for 140 yards and two touchdowns while rushing 14 times for a game-high 77 yards and two more scores.

OU will receive to open the second half.

No. 12 Baylor stays undefeated after triple OT victory at TCU

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No. 12 Baylor (9-0, 6-0 Big 12) nearly saw their undefeated record go down in a battle of field goals, but the BEars topped TCU (4-5, 2-4 big 12) in a 29-23 triple-overtime game Saturday afternoon in Fort Worth. Grayland Arnold intercepted a fourth down pass in the third overtime to put the finishing touches on Baylor’s big win that puts them in a terrific spot to play for a Big 12 title.

Baylor kicker John Mayers converted a 51-yard field goal in the final minute of the fourth quarter to help send the game to overtime, which is when the two teams decided that kicking field goals wasn’t fun any more and opted for touchdowns instead. Baylor scored first with JaMycal Hasty running for a short touchdown to open the overtime. TCU answered with Max Duggan completing a 24-yard pass to Te’Vailance Hunt on a 4th & 9 play. The TCU touchdown was not initially called but a video replay overturned the call on the field to credit the Horned Frogs for the score, so they played on.

After the teams exchanged touchdowns in the second overtime, Baylor took a 29-23 lead on a Charlie Brewer pass to Denzel Mims on the second play of the third overtime. TCU looked to be in great position to force a fourth overtime when they moved the ball to the Baylor one-yard line, but a run for a loss of three yards was followed by an incomplete pass. A holding penalty on TCU pushed the football back 10 more yards and later led to a fourth-down try to keep the game alive before falling into the hands of Baylor’s Arnold.

Not every win needs to be pretty, and this one certainly wasn’t. But what this game demonstrated for Matt Rhule is his team is not about to quit on any game. The offense had a rough outing against TCU, but they made the plays they needed the most once they got into overtime. Baylor trailed TCU 9-0 at halftime as this game was dictated by the defenses. Baylor turned the football over twice, but forced three TCU turnovers. Baylor also only managed to get 294 yards of offense against the horned Frogs. Is that good enough? Ordinarily, no, but it was enough to get the job done and go home with an important win for Rhule and the Bears.

Baylor not only remains undefeated but sits atop the Big 12 standings with just three games left to play. Baylor’s next game is a big one. The Bears will host Oklahoma in a battle for first place in the Big 12. It could also be a potential preview of the big 12 championship game, a scenario that became more likely with the win against TCU. Baylor has a one-game lead on Oklahoma in the conference standings, and Baylor will be guaranteed to come out of next week’s matchup with the Sooners no worse than second place in the Big 12. Baylor also owns a head-to-head tiebreaker with Kansas State, who sits in third place in the Big 12 at the start of the day (Kansas State plays at Texas today).

TCU will travel to Lubbock next week to play Texas Tech. The Red Raiders won at West Virginia on Saturday, 38-17.