Jalen McCleskey

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Houston QB D’Eriq King considering leaving team to grad transfer elsewhere in 2020

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Houston quarterback D’Eriq King is considering leaving the team, counting this season as a redshirt and then graduate transferring elsewhere for the 2020 season. If such a move is completed, it’s believed to be a first in major college football.

King’s father, Eric King, told Mark Berman of the Fox affiliate in Houston that the move is a done deal.

However, King himself says the decision is not final.

Whether it happens or not, that such a move is being considered is a radical (and, depending on your perspective) cynical use of the new redshirt rule, passed in 2018, that allows players to compete in up to four games and still count the season as a redshirt.

Kelly Bryant did at Clemson, as did Jalen McCleskey at Oklahoma State. (Ironically, King played McCleskey, now at Tulane, on Thursday night.)

But neither of those players were starting quarterbacks. Bryant’s departure happened after he had just been demoted in favor of Trevor Lawrence.

King is Houston’s starter, and its best player. He has 36 games’ experience under his belt; only one other Cougar has thrown pass this season, freshman Logan Holgorsen. (He’s 1-of-1 for 5 yards.)

King threw for 2,982 yards and 36 touchdowns and rushed for 674 yards and 14 scores last season before missing the final portion to a knee injury. On Thursday he passed Tim Tebow to become the first player in FBS history to rush and throw for a touchdown in 15 consecutive games.

Houston is off to a 1-3 start under new head coach Dana Holgorsen, and it’s clear that the King camp doesn’t believe he’s clicking with the new coaching staff.

And while King’s decision would be treated in some corners of the college football world as a sky-is-falling scenario, it’s telling that King’s experience at Houston is chalked up as business as usual. A product of Manvel, Texas, King was recruited, signed and played his first season for Tom Herman. Herman left for Texas and was replaced by Major Applewhite, but he was fired after two seasons and replaced by Holgorsen.

It appears now that King would like a do-over on the end of his college career, and would like to do so for a coaching staff that he can actually choose to play for.

D’Eriq King breaks Tim Tebow TD record, but Houston stunned on last-second TD by Tulane

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Last week, D’Eriq King tied one of the records set by an all-time college football great.  Thursday night, he broke it — and then he and his teammates had their collective hearts broken.

In Houston’s 38-31 loss to Tulane — Green Wave’s come-from-behind win, on the last drive of the game, featured both a trick play and game-winning touchdown pass with just seconds — King accounted for three touchdowns (two passing, one rushing).  This marks the 15th straight game in which the Cougars quarterback has accounted for at least one passing and one rushing touchdown in the same game.

King now owns the FBS record for such a streak, breaking the record of 14 in a row previously set by Florida’s Tim Tebow more than a decade ago.

In 15 games the past one-plus seasons, the under-the-radar King has accounted for 62 total touchdowns — 42 passing, 20 rushing.  In an injury-shortened 2018 campaign, King threw for 36 touchdowns and put up 14 on the ground.

Despite the record, it’s likely a night King will want to forget.

In the second quarter, Houston held a seemingly comfortable 28-7 lead, but three Tulane touchdowns over the next quarter and a half tied the game; a field goal with 6:10 left in the AAC matchup gave the Green Wave their first lead of the contest.  With just 21 seconds left, however, the Cougars’ own field goal tied it back up at 31-all and we appeared headed for some extra football.

That, though, is when insanity ensued.

The ensuing kickoff gave Tulane the ball at its own 29-yard line.  Seemingly content to let the clock run out and go into overtime, the Green Wave lined up as if they were just going to take a knee… except they didn’t, with Amare Jones taking a handoff and scampering 18 yards 15 seconds left…

… and then, on the very next play, Justin McMillan hit Jalen McCleskey for a 53-yard catch-and-run, aided greatly by poor tackling on the part of the Cougars, that proved to be the game-winning score with just three seconds remaining in the fourth quarter.

Suffice to say, Houston’s first-year head coach was far from pleased with how the game played out.

The Cougars are now 1-3 on the season — after firing their head coach, Major Applewhite, for having the audacity to go 8-5 last season — while the Green Wave improved to 3-1.

That 1-3 start, incidentally, is UH’s worst since 2012.

Mike Gundy rants on ‘liberalism’ and ‘the snowflake’ in question about transfers

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On Sunday, Oklahoma State safety Thabo Mwaniki announced his intention to transfer. On Monday, Oklahoma State head coach Mike Gundy was asked about his decision, and Gundy had plenty of thoughts about it.

While insisting he’s not talking about Mwaniki specifically, Gundy launched into a soliloquy about “liberalism” and “the snowflake.”

“I’m talking about every millennial young person. Generation Z, I think is what they ‘call em,” Gundy said. “It’s the world we live in because if they say, ‘Well, it’s a little bit hard,’ we say, ‘OK, well, let’s go try something else’ vs. ‘Hey, let’s bear down and let’s fight and do this.’

Here’s the full quote, via The Oklahoman‘s Nathan Ruiz:

Mwaniki is the second Cowboy to announce a transfer during this season. Wideout Jalen McCleskey left the team earlier this year.

By the way, Gundy, who is paid $5 million a year, has attempted to use his post to transfer to similar jobs at Arkansas and Tennessee in order to leverage more money out of Oklahoma State.

Oklahoma State WR Jalen McCleskey announces transfer

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In a purely shocking move, Oklahoma State head coach Mike Gundy announced Monday that wide receiver Jalen McCleskey will utilize the new redshirt rule and transfer immediately.

McCleskey told Gundy he is leaving due to a lack of playing time.

A 3-star recruit out of Louisiana, McCleskey caught 29 balls as a true freshman in 2015, led the team with 73 grabs as a sophomore and snared 50 passes last season. Through four games in 2018, McCleskey ranked second on the team with 15 receptions for 155 yards and two touchdowns. He caught four passes for 52 yards in a 41-17 loss to No. 25 Texas Tech on Saturday.

After years of playing third fiddle to James Washington and Marcell Ateman, McCleskey, presumably figured to be the offense’s top option in his senior year, but fellow senior Taylor Cornelius has favored sophomore Tylan Wallace, turning to him for a team-high 26 completions.

McCleskey’s departure is part of a new phenomenon of players utilizing the new redshirt rule to their advantage. By leaving when he is, McCleskey will not have this season count against his eligibility, thus allowing him to play elsewhere in 2019.

He leaves school as one of the 10 most productive receivers in Oklahoma State history, hauling in 167 passes for 1,865 yards and 17 touchdowns.

 

No. 15 Oklahoma State survives Lubbock gut check

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Fighting to keep its Big 12 and national championship hopes alive, No. 15 Oklahoma State rolled up 32 first downs and 602 yards of total offense but still hung on to outlast Texas Tech, 41-34 in Lubbock.

It appeared early like Oklahoma State was going to run the Red Raiders off their own field. The Cowboys forced a Texas Tech three-and-out to open the game, then moved 68 yards in seven plays to take a 7-0 lead on a 14-yard strike from Mason Rudolph to James Washington. The Cowboys forced another punt on Texas Tech’s next touch, and then advanced the ball to the Texas Tech red zone before Damarcus Fields grabbed a Rudolph overthrow and returned it 95 yards for a touchdown to level the game at 7-7.

Oklahoma State (4-1, 1-1 Big 12) again moved to the red zone on its third possession, but Texas Tech forced a field goal try that Matt Ammendola doinked off the right upright from 22 yards out. Given new life, Texas Tech raced 80 yards in eight snaps, taking a 14-7 lead on a 3-yard toss from Nic Shimonek to Dylan Cantrell. The Red Raiders briefly seized complete control of the game when Marcell Ateman was ruled short of the line to gain on a 3rd-and-10 completion at the Texas Tech 10-yard line, but a replay review handed him a first down, and Rudolph tied the game again one play later on a toss to running back Justice Hill.

Texas Tech (3-1, 0-1 Big 12) punted for a third time on its next possession, and Oklahoma State grabbed its second lead of the game when Rudolph closed an 88-yard drive by finding Jalen McCleskey wide open for a 4-yard touchdown toss.

The Red Raiders held serve with a field goal, although Justin Stockton appeared to cross the plane on a run with five seconds left before halftime but was ruled out of bounds.

Shimonek’s pass was batted away with two seconds left, and Michael Barden booted a 22-yard field goal as time expired.

Oklahoma State accepted the ball to open the second half and picked up where it left off, moving 75 yards in eight plays and grabbing a 28-17 lead on an 8-yard Rudolph run. The Cowboys then forced another three-and-out and had a chance to blow the game open, but failed to cash in a first-and-goal from the 9-yard line and settled for a 22-yard Ammendola chip shot.

The teams traded field goals until Texas Tech pulled back within seven on a 1-yard Stockton run, pushing the score to 34-27 on the first play of the fourth quarter. Oklahoma State was flagged for an unsportsmanlike conduct flag after the score, allowing Texas Tech to kickoff from midfield — and the Red Raiders took advantage by recovering an onside kick. However, Texas Tech immediately gave back that extra possession when Shimonek under-threw a screen pass that Cowboys defensive lineman Jordan Brailford easily intercepted. But the Tech defense forced a three-and-out and the first OSU punt of the night, then tied the game at 34-34 with 9:56 to play on a 1-yard Desmond Nisby plunge.

Oklahoma State rebounded from its one bad possession by putting together another good one, moving 73 yards to the Texas Tech 2-yard line, but Rudolph’s third-and-goal keeper was stuffed, and Ammendola again doinked a chip shot field goal off the same right upright.

The Red Raiders had a chance to take their first lead since 14-7 but advanced only to their own 37 before punting the ball back to Oklahoma State with 3:21 remaining. Aided by a 26-yard completion to Ateman on 3rd-and-5, Rudolph put Oklahoma State back in front with his second rushing touchdown, an untouched 16-yard scamper with 1:12 to play.

Texas Tech moved to midfield on its last-gasp drive, but Shimonek fired four straight incomplete passes to end the game.

Rudolph closed the night hitting 27-of-38 throws for 376 yards with three scores and one interception while adding 50 yards and two scores on the ground. It was Rudolph’s 17th 300-yard passing game, breaking a record previously held by Brandon Weeden. Hill ran 30 times for 164 yards, and Washington caught nine passes for 127 yards and a score.

Shimonek completed 29-of-46 passes for 330 yards with a touchdown and an interception, while the Red Raiders eeked out only 54 yards on 26 carries.

It was Oklahoma State’s ninth straight win over the Red Raiders, and evened the all-time series at 21-21-3.