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Arizona player suspended over COVID-19 protocol violations says he’s not comfortable with said policies

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A storyline involving an Arizona football player has taken another twist.

According to Tucson.com, offensive lineman Edgar Burrola was suspended this week by the Arizona football team.  Why?  For violating the athletic department’s COVID-19 protocols.  The website wrote that “Burrola’s resistance to following safety protocols, which include face coverings and physical distancing during on-campus workouts, led to concern within the program that Arizona could become another Michigan State or Rutgers.”

In a subsequent interview with ESPN.com, Burrola acknowledged that he had violated the school’s protocols.  The offensive lineman also stated he didn’t trust those same protocols for which he was suspended.

From the report:

He confirmed to ESPN that he broke protocol — including showing up to the team facility without a mask and breaking a mandatory quarantine — but also said that he was considering sitting out the season because of his concerns.

“I don’t feel comfortable with the school policies, and I let my [position] coach know that,” Burrola told ESPN.

The position coach would be offensive line coach Kyle DeVan.  Thus far, there’s bee no comment from the Arizona football team on this latest development.

“There’s some people that are saying that we’re making guys do this, we’re making guys do that,” Arizona head football coach Kevin Sumlin said earlier this week. “What we are making them do is go through the protocol. And if you’re not gonna adhere to the protocol, then we can’t have you here.

“It’s my job to protect and uphold that protocol for everybody else that’s involved in this organization — players, coaches, administrators, medical (personnel). You’ve got coaches’ families.

“If you’re not gonna pay attention to the protocol, wear a mask, all that other stuff, we just can’t have you around.”

Appearing in 11 games last season for the Wildcats, Burrola started six of those contests at right tackle.  Tucson.com wrote that the redshirt junior will remain “on the roster with a reduced scholarship.”

Arizona suspends OL Edgar Burrola for violating COVID-19 protocols

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Courtesy of Arizona, we have a unique reason for a football player seeing punishment being meted out.

According to Tucson.com, offensive lineman Edgar Burrola has been suspended by the Arizona football team.  Why?  For violating the athletic department’s COVID-19 protocols.  The website wrote that “Burrola’s resistance to following safety protocols, which include face coverings and physical distancing during on-campus workouts, led to concern within the program that Arizona could become another Michigan State or Rutgers.”

Both of those Big Ten schools announced in the past week that their entire football teams had been placed under quarantine due to COVID-19 concerns.  In late June, Arizona paused its phased return of football players due to increased cases of the virus in the state.

“There’s some people that are saying that we’re making guys do this, we’re making guys do that,” Arizona head football coach Kevin Sumlin told the newspaper. “What we are making them do is go through the protocol. And if you’re not gonna adhere to the protocol, then we can’t have you here.

“It’s my job to protect and uphold that protocol for everybody else that’s involved in this organization — players, coaches, administrators, medical (personnel). You’ve got coaches’ families.

“If you’re not gonna pay attention to the protocol, wear a mask, all that other stuff, we just can’t have you around.”

Appearing in 11 games last season for the Wildcats, Burrola started six of those contests at right tackle.  Tucson.com wrote that the redshirt junior will remain “on the roster with a reduced scholarship.”

College Football in Coronavirus Quarantine: On this day in CFT history, including Nick Saban offering up an idea for how Penn State can help victims of sexual abuse

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The sports world, including college football, had essentially screeched to a halt in the spring as countries around the world battled the coronavirus pandemic. As such, there was a dearth of college football news as the sport went into a COVID-induced hibernation.  Slowly, though, the game is coming back to life.  Hopefully.

That being said, we thought it might be fun to go back through the CollegeFootballTalk archives that stretch back to 2009 and take a peek at what transpired in the sport on this date.

So, without further ado — ok, one further ado — here’s what happened in college football on July 19, by way of our team of CFT writers both past and present.

(P.S.: If any of our readers have ideas on posts they’d like to read during this college football down-time, leave your suggestions in the comments section.  Mailbag, maybe?)

2019

THE HEADLINE: Jim Harbaugh: Michigan close to scheduling football game overseas
THE SYNOPSIS: Michigan fans: Can we win games in the United States first?  Especially against our hated rival?

2018

THE HEADLINE: Dabo Swinney undecided on Clemson starting QB
THE SYNOPSIS: Trevor Lawrence or Kelly Bryant? Bryant began the 2018 season as the starter.  Then lost his job to the then-true freshman Lawrence a couple of weeks in.  Bryant then transferred to Missouri in December of that year.

2017

THE HEADLINE: Tommy Tuberville to join ESPN roster of college football analysts
THE SYNOPSIS: Three years later, the former Auburn head coach is the favorite to become a United States Senator from the great state of Alabama.

2016

THE HEADLINE: It’s a go: Big 12 to pursue expansion
THE SYNOPSIS: Four years later, the Big 12 remains at 10 teams.  So much for that.

2015

THE HEADLINE: As a baseball pitcher, Kevin Sumlin makes a heckuva football coach
THE SYNOPSIS: It wasn’t Baba Booey bad.  But it wasn’t good, either.  At all.

2012

THE HEADLINE: Nick Saban has an idea for Penn State on how it can help abuse victims
THE SYNOPSIS: The idea? Add a tax to ticket sales for athletic events and giving the proceeds to a child abuse charity.

College Football in Coronavirus Quarantine: On this day in CFT history, including the family of Joe Paterno, Penn State reacting to the release of the Freeh report

college football
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The sports world, including college football, had essentially screeched to a halt in the spring as countries around the world battled the coronavirus pandemic. As such, there was a dearth of college football news as the sport went into a COVID-induced hibernation.  Slowly, though, the game is coming back to life.  Hopefully.

That being said, we thought it might be fun to go back through the CollegeFootballTalk archives that stretch back to 2009 and take a peek at what transpired in the sport on this date.

So, without further ado — ok, one further ado — here’s what happened in college football on July 12, by way of our team of CFT writers both past and present.

(P.S.: If any of our readers have ideas on posts they’d like to read during this college football hiatus, leave your suggestions in the comments section.  Mailbag, maybe?)

2019

THE HEADLINE: FCS player paralyzed vs. Georgia moves into wheelchair-accessible home
THE SYNOPSIS: All things considered, the Devon Gales saga, one four years in the making, was one of the feel-good stories of last offseason.

2018

THE HEADLINE: Report: Paul Finebaum to sign new contract with ESPN
THE SYNOPSIS: Two years later, the College Football Mouth of the South could see his life played out in a television sitcomSeriously.

2017

THE HEADLINE: Kevin Sumlin downplays hot seat in College Station: “I’m feeling the same pressure I feel all of the time”
THE SYNOPSIS: Four months later, Sumlin was kicked to the curb by the Aggies.  Now the head coach at Arizona, Sumlin finished 51-26 with the Aggies in the hyper-competitive SEC West.

2016

THE HEADLINE: Court documents: 14-year-old boy told Joe Paterno of sexual abuse in 1976
THE SYNOPSIS: “I wish I had done more.” JoePa’s own words in the wake of the Jerry Sandusky child rape scandal.  That was our lede for this post then.  And those words, even now, should never, ever be forgotten when it comes to discussing the Penn State head coach’s legacy.

2015

THE HEADLINE: FSU’s Dalvin Cook cited last year for chaining three puppies together
THE SYNOPSIS: It was a bad few days for Cook specifically and Florida State in general.  In addition to abhorrent puppy abuse, Cook was alleged to have punched a woman in the face at a bar. In a different incident in a different bar, teammate and quarterback Deandre Johnson was dismissed after punching a different woman in the face.  Cook was ultimately found not guilty by a jury in his bar incident.

2014

THE HEADLINE: Jameis Winston adds fuel to ‘two more years’ fire
THE SYNOPSIS: Six months later, and after just one more year in Tallahassee, the Florida State quarterback left early for the 2015 NFL Draft.

2012

THE HEADLINE: Freeh Report investigating Penn State’s actions in Jerry Sandusky case released
THE SYNOPSIS: The family of Joe Paterno accepted criticism of the late coach in the report.  The university stated that they are “giving the report careful scrutiny and consideration before making any announcements or recommendations.” As we said above: “I wish I had done more.”

2011

THE HEADLINE: Man takes part in ‘O-H-I-O’ — from his casket
THE SYNOPSIS: My family is overflowing with diehard Ohio State fans.  This is their favorite O-H-I-O ever.  Still.  And there are standing orders to perform one as part of their funerals.

Arizona’s Kevin Sumlin, others to take a 20% pay cut

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Add the Arizona head coach to the burgeoning list of football and athletic department officials financially impacted by the coronavirus pandemic.

Wednesday, Arizona announced that, as part of its financial mitigation plans, senior leadership and will be taking a 20% cut in pay.  Included in that group, of course, is Arizona head football coach Kevin Sumlin.

Last year, Sumlin’s total guaranteed compensation for coaching the Wildcats, per the USA Today coaches salary database, was $2 million.  Thus, the coach will be forfeiting at least $400,000, if the cuts last an entire academic year.

Additionally, three other head coaches — Adia Barnes (women’s basketball), Jay Johnson (baseball), Sean Miller (basketball) — will take the same 20% cut.  Athletic director Dave Heeke will as well.

“Arizona athletics is a proud member of the University of Arizona community, and we are committed to continuing our work to address the economic hardships of this unprecedented crisis,” a statement from the athletics department began. “We will overcome these immense challenges together with compassion and determination because that is the Wildcat Way.”

Arizona becomes at least the fifth Pac-12 school to implement salary reductions over the past month or so.  The others are Colorado, Oregon, USC and Washington State.

Below is a partial list of FBS programs that have initiated various cost-cutting measures for athletic department personnel, including coaches:

Additionally, Pac-12 commissioner Larry Scott, who reportedly made north of $5 million a year ago, is taking a 20% pay cut.  Scott’s Big 12 counterpart, Bob Bowlsby, announced pay cuts for himself and the conference’s staff.