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College Football in Coronavirus Quarantine: On this day in CFT history, including Mark Emmert suggesting six years ago that paying players would doom college sports

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The sports world, including college football, has essentially screeched to a halt as countries around the world battle the coronavirus pandemic. As such, there’s a dearth of college football news as spring practices have all but been canceled at every level of the sport. And there’s even some concern that the health issue could have an impact on the 2020 college football campaign.

In that vein, we thought it might be fun to go back through the CollegeFootballTalk archives that stretch back to 2009 and take a peek at what transpired in the sport on this date.

So, without further ado — ok, one further ado — here’s what happened in college football on June 19, by way of our team of CFT writers both past and present.

(P.S.: If any of our readers have ideas on posts they’d like to read during this college football hiatus, leave your suggestions in the comments section.  Mailbag, maybe?)

2019

THE HEADLINE: Big Ten coaches on hot seat: Record revenues mean those big buyouts don’t mean quite as much
THE SYNOPSIS: Just two B1G programs will have different coaches in 2020.  Chris Ash was fired by Rutgers.  And Mark Dantoniostepped down” at Michigan State.

2018

THE HEADLINE: Lincoln Riley will (barely) make more than his starting QB in 2018
THE SYNOPSIS: The head coach made $4.8 million in guaranteed compensation. Kyler Murray, the ninth-overall pick of the 2019 MLB Draft, was paid a $4.7 million signing bonus.

2016

THE HEADLINE: Tennessee lands eight commitments in one day
THE SYNOPSIS: The 2017-18 seasons produced a combined nine wins.  Vols fans can only hope this year’s recruiting rush produces better on-field results.

2015

THE HEADLINE: Jim Harbaugh effect helping to turn around ticket sales at Michigan
THE SYNOPSIS: In five seasons under Harbaugh, the Wolverines have finished third or fourth in The Big Ten East four times.  U-M is also 0-5 vs. rival Ohio State.

2014

THE HEADLINE: Mark Emmert once again suggests paying players would doom college sports
THE SYNOPSIS: Six years later, players are about to earn money off their own name, image and likeness.  With the begrudging approval of the NCAA.

2013

THE HEADLINE: Johnny Manziel’s angry tweet was fueled by a… parking ticket?
THE SYNOPSIS: What do we always say?  Johnny Football gonna Johnny Football, y’all.

2010

THE HEADLINE: Dr. Lou: Notre Dame should join Big Ten
THE SYNOPSIS: A decade later, many observers align with  Holtz’s opinion.  Except for those whose opinions matter most.  Ya know, the ones who reside in South Bend.

2009

THE HEADLINE: Jim Harbaugh Steers Around the NFL Question
THE SYNOPSIS: On Jan. 7, 2011, Harbaugh officially left Stanford for the San Francisco 49ers.

College Football in Coronavirus Quarantine: On this day in CFT history, including Bob Stoops stating ‘It’s not my intention to coach again. We’ll see what comes.’

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The sports world, including college football, has essentially screeched to a halt as countries around the world battle the coronavirus pandemic. As such, there’s a dearth of college football news as spring practices have all but been canceled at every level of the sport. And there’s even some concern that the health issue could have an impact on the 2020 college football campaign.

In that vein, we thought it might be fun to go back through the CollegeFootballTalk archives that stretch back to 2009 and take a peek at what transpired in the sport on this date.

So, without further ado — ok, one further ado — here’s what happened in college football on June 9, by way of our team of CFT writers both past and present.

(P.S.: If any of our readers have ideas on posts they’d like to read during this college football hiatus, leave your suggestions in the comments section.  Mailbag, maybe?)

2019

THE HEADLINE: Aaron Hernandez teammate Tony Joiner becomes second member of 2007 Florida team charged with murder
THE SYNOPSIS: Joiner was accused of murdering his girlfriend three years before. The victim, Heyzel Obando, was a 26-year-old mother of two girls.

2018

THE HEADLINE: Latest Heisman odds have Stanford’s Bryce Love, Wisconsin’s Jonathan Taylor out front
THE SYNOPSIS: Love was at 5/1, Taylor at 7/1.  The latter finished ninth in the voting, the former wasn’t even in the Top 10. In fairness to Love, his 2018 campaign was an injury-plagued one. As for that year’s Heisman winner?  Oklahoma quarterback Kyler Murray‘s odds were 20/1.

2017

THE HEADLINE: Bob Stoops: ‘It’s not my intention to coach again. We’ll see what comes’
THE SYNOPSIS: Stoops did return to coaching — in the now-defunct XFL. He was also rumored to be interested in the Florida State job.  Obviously, nothing came out of that situation.

2016

THE HEADLINE: Florida names Ben Hill Griffin Stadium field after Steve Spurrier
THE SYNOPSIS: Certainly, The OBC was well-deserving such an honor in The Swamp.

2014

THE HEADLINE: Mississippi State assistant coach’s house the scene of heroin (and live chicken) bust
THE SYNOPSIS: Offseason headlines, y’all!  It should be noted that the then-assistant, Deshea Townsend, merely owned the house as a rental property.

2013

THE HEADLINE: Parole Tide: Harvey Updyke to be released from jail Monday
THE SYNOPSIS: I was damn-proud of that headline.  And rightly so.  Don’t @ me.

2011

THE HEADLINE: Pryor’s attorney hints at legal action, makes NCAA-slavery connection
THE SYNOPSIS: You think that one caused a bit of a dustup in the comments?  And on Twitter?

Joe Burrow joins Cam Newton in exclusive NFL draft club: Heisman Trophy, national title, No. 1 pick in succession

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Make some room for a new member of a super-elite triple crown club, Cam Newton. Joe Burrow is moving in.

In 2011, Newton became the first player in football history to win a Heisman Trophy, win the national championship, and then immediately go on to be the No. 1 overall pick of the NFL Draft in sequence. The former Auburn quarterback took the Tigers on a magical run to the SEC title and a BCS national championship while taking home Auburn’s third Heisman Trophy in program history. The Carolina Panthers kept the story rolling a few months later by taking Newton with the first overall pick in the 2011 NFL Draft, making him the franchise quarterback for (nearly) the next decade.

While there have been a couple of Heisman Trophy winners since Newton to be chosen with the top overall pick (Baker Mayfield and Kyler Murray, both of Oklahoma), and a few others have obviously been drafted elsewhere, Newton remained in a club all to himself. Until now.

LSU’s Joe Burrow was selected with the top overall pick of the 2020 NFL Draft on Thursday night by the Cincinnati Bengals. This is just the latest chapter of Burrow’s remarkable story. Like Newton, Burrow went on a historic run with LSU last season to run away with the 2019 Heisman Trophy en route to an SEC title and, later, a College Football Playoff national championship.

As if the SEC needed anything else to brag about when it comes to the NFL draft. Now the conference has been home to the only two players to pull off this triple crown of football achievement.

NOTE: Florida State fans have been vocal in reminding me about Jameis Winston. Winston did win the Heisman Trophy and a national championship before later going on to be the No. 1 overall pick, but he played one more year of college football before turning pro after winning the Heisman and the national championship. The headline has been adjusted to attempt making this a bit more accurate. Apologies from the writer to Florida State fans. And Winston.

Joe Burrow follows Baker Mayfield and Kyler Murray for Heisman Trophy first in NFL draft

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Former LSU quarterback Joe Burrow has helped to make some NFL draft history. By being named the No. 1 overall pick of the 2020 NFL Draft by the Cincinnati Bengals on Thursday night, Burrow was the third consecutive Heisman Trophy winner to go No. 1 overall in the following draft. This is the first time in draft and Heisman Trophy history that the No. 1 overall draft pick won the Heisman Trophy the previous season.

Burrow was chosen with the top overall pick one year after 2018 Heisman Trophy winner Kyler Murray of Oklahoma was selected with the top pick in the 2019 NFL Draft by the Arizona Cardinals. The previous year, in 2018, Baker Mayfield of Oklahoma was selected with the first overall pick by the Cleveland Browns. Mayfield took home the Heisman Trophy in 2017.

Burrow is the 23rd Heisman Trophy player to go No. 1 overall in the NFL draft. Another LSU icon, Billy Cannon, pulled off the accomplishment in 1960 after winning the Heisman Trophy in 1959. The only other schools to have multiple Heisman Trophy winners that were chosen first overall in the draft are Oklahoma (4), Notre Dame (3), USC (2), and Auburn (2).

Heisman Trophy Winners Drafted No. 1 Overall in NFL Draft

  • 1935 – Jay Berwanger – Chicago (Philadelphia Eagles)
  • 1940 – Tom Harmon – Michigan (Chicago Bears)
  • 1942 – Frank Sinkwich – Georgia (Detroit Lions)
  • 1943 – Angelo Bertelli – Notre Dame (Boston Yanks)
  • 1949 – Leon Hart – Notre Dame (Detroit Lions)
  • 1956 – Paul Hornung – Notre Dame (Green Bay Packers)
  • 1959 – Billy Cannon – LSU (Los Angeles Rams)
  • 1961 – Ernie Davis – Syracuse (Washington Redskins)
  • 1962 – Terry Baker – Oregon State (Los Angeles Rams)
  • 1969 – O.J. Simpson – USC (Buffalo Bills)
  • 1970 – Jim Plunkett – Stanford (New England Patriots)
  • 1977 – Earl Campbell – Texas (Houston Oilers)
  • 1978 – Billy Sims – Oklahoma (Detroit Lions)
  • 1980 – George Rogers – South Carolina (New Orleans Saints)
  • 1985 – Bo Jackson – Auburn (Tampa Bay Buccaneers)
  • 1986 – Vinnie Testaverde – Miami (Tampa Bay Buccaneers)
  • 2002 – Carson Palmer – USC (Cincinnati Bengals)
  • 2008Sam Bradford – Oklahoma (St. Louis Rams)
  • 2010Cam Newton – Auburn (Carolina Panthers)
  • 2013Jameis Winston – Florida State (Tampa Bay Buccaneers)
  • 2017 – Baker Mayfield – Oklahoma (Cleveland Browns)
  • 2018 – Kyler Murray — Oklahoma (Arizona Cardinals)
  • 2019 – Joe Burrow, LSU (Cincinnati Bengals)

Murray and Mayfield completed a pretty rare feat as the top picks of the draft in back-to-back years. The 2018 and 2019 drafts marked the first time the top overall picks in consecutive seasons had come out of the same school since 1968 and 1969. USC’s Ron Yary and O.J. Simpson went No.1  overall in those years, respectively.

So, the pressure is on for whoever ends up winning the 2020 Heisman Trophy. The bar has certainly been raised.

Big 12 reaches stalemate on “Baker Mayfield Rule”

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If Oklahoma quarterback Baker Mayfield is going to regain a  year of eligibility in 2017, he will have to do so outside the Big 12. The Big 12 arrived at a stalemate on a proposed rule regarding non-recruited walk-ons and transferring without penalty. The final vote of 5-5 means the proposed rule will not be passed, as it needed a majority in favor to approve the rule.

The rule was proposed by Oklahoma, which has led many to refer to the proposal as the Baker Mayfield Rule, which is fitting. Mayfield is a potential Heisman Trophy candidate heading into the 2016 season and it would make sense Oklahoma would want to maximize their time with the hot hand leading the offense if they could help make it possible. Of course, Oklahoma does have Kyler Murray sitting in waiting as well for 2017.

Mayfield was a walk-on at Texas Tech in 2013 and he soon grabbed the starting job w the Red Raiders. Things turned sour in Lubbock and eventually led to Mayfield transferring to Oklahoma within the Big 12. Mayfield walked on at Oklahoma as well. During the process, Mayfield sat out one season. Because he was unable to receive any extra eligibility during his transfer process through a lengthy appeals process with the Big 12 and the NCAA, Mayfield will be a senior in 2016 with no more eligibility with the Sooners. He could, however, get back an extra year if he were to transfer to another school outside of the Big 12 in 2017.

Essentially, what the Big 12 is doing is limiting potential options for walk-on players. Not every walk-on will turn out to be Mayfield, and odds are schools will have scholarships open up at some point that can be used to reward those walk-ons, but the Big 12 is now eliminating nine potential landing places for a walk-on looking to play one more season of college football. That’s a shame, because the vote result was more about protecting the stability of a roster for a Big 12 program rather than doing what may be arguably better for the individual player.

Oklahoma athletics director Joe Castiglione said he and Oklahoma are prepared to continue pushing for this proposal in the future.