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College Football amidst Coronavirus Pandemic: On this day in CFT history, including the family of Joe Paterno filing an appeal of the NCAA’s sanctions of Penn State

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The sports world, including college football, had essentially screeched to a halt in the spring as countries around the world battled the coronavirus pandemic. As such, there was a dearth of college football news as the sport went into a COVID-induced hibernation.  Slowly, though, the game is coming back to life.  Hopefully.

That being said, we thought it might be fun to go back through the CollegeFootballTalk archives that stretch back to 2009 and take a peek at what transpired in the sport on this date.

So, without further ado — ok, one further ado — here’s what happened in college football on August 3, by way of our team of CFT writers both past and present.

(P.S.: If any of our readers have ideas on posts they’d like to read during this college football down-time, leave your suggestions in the comments section.  Mailbag, maybe?)

2019

THE HEADLINE: Les Miles adds second transferring son to Kansas football roster
THE SYNOPSIS: It was a veritable All in the Mad Hatter Family reunion in Lawrence. In November of 2018, Miles was officially introduced as Kansas’ next head football coach.  Early on in the 2019 offseason, quarterback Manny Miles transferred in from North Carolina.  Then former Nebraska and Texas A&M fullback Ben Miles followed his dad and brother to KU.  Ben Miles ran for one yard on three carries and caught a pass for two yards in his first season with the Jayhawks.  In three games, Manny Miles completed 9-of-17 passes (52.9%) for 114 yards, one touchdown and two interceptions.

2019

THE HEADLINE: Ex-Wisconsin WR Quintez Cephus acquitted of sex assault charges
THE SYNOPSIS: This was the end of a very trying year and a half off the field for the standout wide receiver.  Cephus, incidentally, returned to the Badgers for the 2019 season.  He then left UW early for the 2020 NFL Draft.

2018

THE HEADLINE: Urban Meyer tweets statement, says he has always followed proper procedures
THE SYNOPSIS: This came shortly after the Ohio State coach was placed on on paid administrative leave amidst the Zach Smith imbroglio.  Eventually, Meyer would be suspended for three games.  And then retired.

2017

THE HEADLINE: Nick Saban not suspending Alabama DL Da’Shawn Hand after DUI
THE SYNOPSIS: It just means more.  More leniency, apparently.

2016

THE HEADLINE: Report: Maurice Smith ostracized, found ‘personal belongings in the trash’ after decision to transfer from ‘Bama
THE SYNOPSIS: After initial blocking him, Alabama ultimately relented and allowed the defensive backs to transfer to Georgia.

2012

THE HEADLINE: Paterno family files appeal against NCAA for PSU sanctions
THE SYNOPSIS: The family of three late Joe Paterno subsequently filed a counter to the Freeh report that led to historic sanctions a on the Penn State football program. And then sued the NCAA in May of 2013.  Before dropping the suit four years later.  Three years after that, the Penn State Board of Trustees announced the university and the Paterno family have reached a resolution on their ongoing issues.

2010

THE HEADLINE: After shaky media days appearance, Paterno Watch resumes in earnest
THE SYNOPSIS: With a tainted legacy in tow, Joe Paterno retired 16 months later.  Two months later, the disgraced Penn State legend died at the age of 85.

Les Miles, Kansas ‘heartbroken’ over death of student manager Jack Roche, who died over the weekend after being hit by a car

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The extended Kansas football family is mourning the loss of one it’s own over the weekend.

According to the Lawrence Journal-World, and citing multiple people close to the Kansas football program, Jack Roche died in his hometown of Chicago late Saturday night after being hit by a car.  Roche had just turned 21 in May.  He was also scheduled to graduate from the university the same month next year.

Roche had spent the past couple of years as a student manager for the Jayhawks.  Les Miles just completed his first season as the Kansas football head coach, and mourned the young man’s death in a tweet Sunday night.

“The KU football family is heartbroken to hear of the passing of Jack Roche,” the coach wrote. “Jack was a tremendous, hard-working young man who embodied what our program is all about. We will remember Jack and he will forever be a part of our family. Our thoughts and prayers are with the Roches.”

Roche was beloved by players past and present as well.

“He always had a smile on his face and was genuinely one of the best people in the entire program,” ex-Jayhawk quarterback Carter Stanley said according to the Journal-World. “We’d talk every day, but I’d go in earlier than usual on Mondays and we’d share the results of our fantasy football teams from the day before, which usually gave me a chance to give him a hard time for being a Bears fan.”

Our thoughts, prayers and condolences go out to all of those impacted by Roche’s death.

Kansas is the latest to hit the coronavirus-related pause button on workouts as a dozen Jayhawks test positive for COVID-19

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Go ahead and add Kansas to the growing list of football programs hitting the workout pause button.

The Big 12 announced back in May that student-athletes could begin returning to campus June 15 for voluntary workouts.  Kansas was one of those football programs in the conference to take advantage of the edict.  Nearly three weeks later, however, KU has announced that it’s suspending those workouts.  The reason?  A dozen Jayhawk football players tested positive for COVID-19.  Less than a week ago, just three were positives.

“Due to the positives within our own program and the increased cases in our region including our student-athletes’ home communities, we believe all football student-athletes and staff should self-quarantine for 14-days,” the school stated in a release.  After the 14 days, all players and staff will be tested again.

Below are statements from the Kansas athletic director and its head football coach.

Jeff Long
After the increase in positive COVID-19 tests within our football program, our medical team at Kansas Team Health has recommended discontinuing voluntary workouts immediately. Our priority remains to keep our student-athletes safe and healthy, especially during this pandemic, and will follow the recommendations of our medical professionals.

“We will only resume our preparations after the 14-day quarantine is complete and our student-athletes and staff have been tested for the virus prior to participating in football activities. In the meantime, we continue to educate our student-athletes, as well as coaches and staff, on the importance of following the policies and procedures and recommendations from our Kansas Team Health physicians and the CDC.

Les Miles
When we welcomed our young men back to campus a couple of weeks ago for voluntary workouts, even with the policies and procedures in place to try and protect them from becoming infected with the virus, events outside of our control has made the decision to pause these workouts necessary. Our trainers and doctors will remain in daily contact with each of the student-athletes that tested positive to support them and what we hope will involve only minor symptoms if any. We will follow medical recommendations on returning to activities.

Kansas football is the latest but certainly not the first impacted by the pandemic.  Or the last, more than likely

Early this past week, Arizona announced that it was pausing its phased return of student-athletes to campus.  Prior to that, eight individuals connected to the Boise State football program tested positive, forcing the school to temporarily scuttle workouts.  June 20, K-State announced that it is pausing all voluntary workouts as well.  The reason?  “[A] total of 14 student-athletes have tested positive for active COVID-19 following PCR (polymerase chain reaction) testing of more than 130 student-athletes.” The weekend before that, Houston decided to put a halt to voluntary on-campus workouts after six symptomatic UH student-athletes tested positive for COVID-19.

Other programs have seen a high number of players test positive but continue workouts.  Among those are Clemson (37 players tested positive), LSU (30 players quarantined), Texas (13 confirmed positives for football players) and Texas Tech (23 positives for players/staffers).

Kansas saved $450,000 by not initially paying David Beaty his buyout, but paid $474,000 thus far in legal fees to do so

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I’m not very good at math, and apparently neither is the Kansas football program.  Or PR, for that matter.

In early November of 2018, Kansas announced that David Beaty would be fired as head football coach upon the conclusion of that regular season.  At the time, athletic director Jeff Long stated that the university would honor the terms of Beaty’s contract, which included a $3 million buyout payable over a six-month period.  That never actually happened.  And led to a contentious lawsuit.  One that involved the school needing to euphemistically find “a dead hooker” in Beaty’s past.  Because of minor NCAA violations.

Earlier this month, the university announced that it has reached a settlement with Beaty.  For $2.55 million.  We wrote at the time that it meant that, “after nearly two years worth of lawyers fees and such are factored in, the university likely ended up… costing itself money they could’ve saved if they had just paid Beaty the money he was contractually owed in the first place.”

So, if my math is correct, the university saved $450,00 by forcing Beaty to get litigious.  And how much have they doled out in outside legal services?  According to invoices obtained by the Kansas City Star, that number would be $473,730.04.  The Star added the proviso “so far.” Which, of course, means that figure could be higher when it’s all said and done.

In a statement a week ago announcing the agreement, KU wrote that, “despite the settlement, the University maintains that the facts and principles behind its position remain intact.” So they have that going for them.  Which is nice.

In four seasons as the Jayhawks head coach, Beaty went 6-42 overall and 2-34 in Big 12 play.  In mid-November of 2018, Kansas confirmed that former LSU head coach Les Miles would be taking over for Beaty.

Kansas settles David Beaty lawsuit for $2.55 million when they could’ve just paid his $3 million buyout two years ago

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Our long national nightmare when it comes to a former Kansas football coach is over.  Or something like that.

In early November of 2018, Kansas announced that David Beaty would be fired as head football coach upon the conclusion of that regular season.  At the time, athletic director Jeff Long stated that the university would honor the terms of Beaty’s contract, which included a $3 million buyout payable over a six-month period.  That never actually happened.  And led to a contentious lawsuit.  One that involved the school needing to euphemistically find “a dead hooker” in Beaty’s past.  Because of minor NCAA violations.

Friday, the university announced that it has reached a settlement with Beaty.  For $2.55 million.  Which means, after nearly two years worth of lawyers fees and such are factored in, the university likely ended up… costing itself money they could’ve saved if they had just paid Beaty the money he was contractually owed in the first place.

Kudos, KU.  Below is the university’s attempt at a face-saving statement:

Today, Kansas athletics entered into a $2.55 million financial settlement with former head football coach David Beaty, ending all litigation and disputes. Despite the settlement, the University maintains that the facts and principles behind its position remain intact.  For the betterment of KU, and driven by a willingness to move forward during a time of uncertainty in college athletics, the University has now put this matter behind us.  All funds to be paid as part of the settlement will come from the original amount placed in escrow during the 2018-2019 fiscal year following Beaty’s separation from KU.

In four seasons as the Jayhawks head coach, Beaty went 6-42 overall and 2-34 in Big 12 play.  In mid-November of 2018, Kansas confirmed that former LSU head coach Les Miles would be taking over for Beaty.