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College Football in Coronavirus Quarantine: On this day in CFT history, including Ohio State getting set to answer NCAA charges

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The sports world, including college football, has essentially screeched to a halt as countries around the world battle the coronavirus pandemic. As such, there’s a dearth of college football news as spring practices have all but been canceled at every level of the sport. And there’s even some concern that the health issue could have an impact on the 2020 college football campaign.

In that vein, we thought it might be fun to go back through the CollegeFootballTalk archives that stretch back to 2009 and take a peek at what transpired in the sport on this date.

So, without further ado — ok, one further ado — here’s what happened in college football on July 6, by way of our team of CFT writers both past and present.

(P.S.: If any of our readers have ideas on posts they’d like to read during this college football hiatus, leave your suggestions in the comments section.  Mailbag, maybe?)

2019

THE HEADLINE: Former Clemson, East Carolina RB Tyshon Dye dies in drowning accident
THE SYNOPSIS: Dye was a member of Clemson’s national championship team in 2016 and the runners-up squad in 2015.

2019

THE HEADLINE: Alabama football staff member arrested for DUI for second time since being hired
THE SYNOPSIS: This most certainly isn’t part of The Process™Josh Chapman played his college football for Nick Saban and the Crimson Tide.  As of this posting, he remains as part of the extended UA football staff.

2018

THE HEADLINE: Four-star QB-turned-minor league baseball player has football offers from three SEC schools
THE SYNOPSIS: Cord Sandberg ultimately chose Auburn over LSU, NC State.  In three career appearances, Sandberg completed six of his eight pass attempts for 106 yards and two touchdowns.  He also ran for 70 yards on 10 carries.  The Florida native will be a redshirt sophomore this coming season.

2017

THE HEADLINE: Arkansas, Notre Dame announce future home-and-home
THE SYNOPSIS: The Lou Holtz Bowl, y’all! The two teams will meet in South Bend Sept. 12 this season.  The back-end of the home-and-home is set for 2025 in Fayetteville.

2015

THE HEADLINE: Disturbing security video of FSU QB De’Andre Johnson (allegedly) punching woman surfaces
THE SYNOPSIS: Florida State dismissed Johnson very shortly after the video was released.

2013

THE HEADLINE: Urban Meyer finally talks Aaron Hernandez; says blaming him is ‘irresponsible’
THE SYNOPSIS: These were Meyer’s first public comments on the former Gator star’s stunning fall from glory.

2011

THE HEADLINE: Ohio State to answer NCAA charges on Friday
THE SYNOPSIS: The so-called Tat-gate violations had already cost Jim Tressel his job as the Buckeyes head coach.  And would’ve cost a handful of players, including Terrelle Pryor, five games in 2011.  Pryor, though, entered the 2011 Supplemental Draft.

College Football in Coronavirus Quarantine: On this day in CFT history, including Sean ‘Puffy’ Combs/Puff Daddy/P. Diddy/Diddy arrested for allegedly assaulting UCLA’s strength coach with a kettlebell

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The sports world, including college football, has essentially screeched to a halt as countries around the world battle the coronavirus pandemic. As such, there’s a dearth of college football news as spring practices have all but been canceled at every level of the sport. And there’s even some concern that the health issue could have an impact on the 2020 college football campaign.

In that vein, we thought it might be fun to go back through the CollegeFootballTalk archives that stretch back to 2009 and take a peek at what transpired in the sport on this date.

So, without further ado — ok, one further ado — here’s what happened in college football on June 22, by way of our team of CFT writers both past and present.

(P.S.: If any of our readers have ideas on posts they’d like to read during this college football hiatus, leave your suggestions in the comments section.  Mailbag, maybe?)

2019

THE HEADLINE: Reports: UConn could leave American for Big East
THE SYNOPSIS: Four days later, the Huskies confirmed non-football sports will be moving to the Big East.  2020 will mark UConn’s first season as a college football independent.

2018

THE HEADLINE: Chad Morris finally finalizes $3.5 million contract with Arkansas
THE SYNOPSIS: One year and five months later, the Razorbacks fired Morris.  After two seasons as head coach.  Now the offensive coordinator at Auburn, Morris is owed a $10 million buyout from UA.

2018

THE HEADLINE: Washington State coach Mike Leach not going quietly after Twitter spat, continues to blast reporter
THE SYNOPSIS: Leach is not one to shy away from creating controversy via the Twitter machine. Even if it costs him some players.

2017

THE HEADLINE: Kansas planning $300 million stadium renovation and new indoor football facility
THE SYNOPSIS: Just wanted to put this out there as a reminder.  In the last three seasons (2007-09) under Mark Mangino, KU won 25 games.  In the past 10 seasons (2010-19) since Mangino was fired, the Jayhawks have won 21 games.

2015

THE HEADLINE: Reports: UCLA strength coach assaulted by Diddy
THE SYNOPSIS: Diddy Day in college football included a kettlebell as the alleged weapon of choice.  The mogul, whose son, Justin Combs, was a Bruins defensive back at the time, was initially arrested on felony charges.  The felony charge was subsequently dropped.

2014

THE HEADLINE: Is Texas A&M actually running the state? YESSIR!
THE SYNOPSIS: This one garnered nearly 200 comments.  It’s almost like this is a college football rivalry that should still be played or something.

2010

THE HEADLINE: Was Nick Saban‘s ‘mea culpa’ a ploy to get back to NFL?
THE SYNOPSIS: A decade later, the answer is still the same.  No.  Probably.

Alabama and Ohio State agree to future home-and-home, first-ever for the college football bluebloods

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Alabama and Ohio State, on their respective campuses?  Hell.  Yes.  Sign us up.

Thursday afternoon, a pair of college football bluebloods announced that they have reached an agreement on a home-and-home series.  The Crimson Tide will travel to Ohio Stadium on Sept. 18, 2027.  The following season, the Buckeyes will make the trek to Bryant-Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa on Sept. 9.

Neither Alabama nor Ohio State has played at each other’s home stadiums.  Obviously, this will serve as the first-ever home-and-home series between the powers.

“The addition of Ohio State to our future non-conference schedule shows the commitment our program and administration has to creating the best possible games for our players and fans,” Alabama head football coach Nick Saban said in a statement. “I have coached a lot of years in the SEC and Big 10 and Bryant-Denny Stadium and Ohio Stadium are two of the very best environments in college football. Non-conference series like Alabama-Ohio State are so important to the health of college football, and we are very pleased that we could get this series completed.”

All four of the previous meetings between Alabama and OSU have come on neutral fields.  The last meeting came in the 2014 College Football Playoff semifinal.  OSU’s win in that matchup propelled it to the national time game and, ultimately, a win over Oregon.

For those curious, Saban would be 75 years old at the time of that first matchup.

Former Alabama five-star signee’s time at Colorado might not be over after all

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Press pause on an erstwhile Colorado football player’s ouster from the Buffaloes.

Antonio Alfano was suspended by the Colorado football team in early March for unspecified violations of team rules.  In late May, it was confirmed by a Colorado football official that Alfano is no longer a member of the Buffaloes.  In fact, the defensive lineman is no longer even enrolled at the Pac-12 school.

However, the Boulder Daily Camera is reporting that there is an opportunity for Alfano to return.  From the report:

Head coach Karl Dorrell told BuffZone, however, that Alfano remains indefinitely suspended and there is a path for him to return to active status if he chooses to take it. Dorrell declined to specify the steps Alfano needs to take in order to return.

According to a source close to Alfano, he received a medical withdrawal from school for the spring semester.

On his personal Twitter account in early November, Alfano announced that he officially decided to move on from Alabama to Colorado.  Alfano’s decision came shortly after taking a visit to the CU campus, and nearly a month after officially entering the NCAA transfer database.

These latest developments are the latest in what’s been a series of headlines for one of the top recruits in the Class of 2019.  And not necessarily positive headlines.  To say the least.

Alfano was suspended for unspecified reasons and didn’t dress for Alabama’s Week 2 home opener against New Mexico State.  Not long after, Nick Saban added a bit of mystery to Alfano’s status when he stated that the highly-touted defensive lineman has “kind of disappeared a little bit” before launching into an oral dissertation about failing to confront and learn from one’s mistakes.

On Twitter in mid-September of 2019, Alfano’s parents stated that, in large part because of an ailing grandmother, their son “has not attended classes or practices” for an unspecified period of time.  Against their wishes, the parents also confirmed that Alfano was entering the transfer database, although at the time it wasn’t yet official.

Saban offered up an update a couple of days after the family’s social-media statement in which the head coach, very bluntly, stated that the defensive lineman had basically quit the team as he hadn’t shown up for football-related activities, classes or counseling for unspecified issues.  The player wasn’t responding to attempts by the team to contact him, either, Saban added.

During summer camp last year, Alfano missed a couple of practices for what were described as personal reasons but ultimately returned to the team.  Even before the suspension, the lineman didn’t play in the season opener against Duke.

A five-star 2019 signee, Alfano was rated as the No. 1 strongside defensive end in the country; the No. 1 player at any position in the state of New Jersey; and the No. 5 player overall on 247Sports.com‘s composite board.  He was the highest-rated Crimson Tide signee during this most recent cycle.

One final note: Alfano went to three different high schools in four years.  Which means, in less than six years, he’s been part of five different football programs.

Ex-Alabama LB Eyabi Anoma dismissed by Houston now headed to the FCS, will be at third different program in less than a year

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A well-traveled former Alabama football is on the move.  Again.

In February of 2019, Eyabi Anoma entered his name into the NCAA transfer database.  A couple of days later, the player pulled his name from the portal, a signal that he intended to remain a part of the Alabama Crimson Tide football team.  Five months later, however, it was confirmed that Anoma was no longer enrolled in classes at UA.

In August of last year, Anoma transferred from Alabama Crimson Tide football to Houston.  At the time of his transfer destination being confirmed, it was reported that Anoma was first suspended by Alabama and then expelled for a vague “university-level issue.” Then, in February of this year, Anoma was dismissed by UH for violating unspecified team rules.  That, not surprisingly, led to Anoma entering the portal yet again.

On Twitter late last week, the linebacker announced that he will be transferring to FCS Tennessee-Martin.  And also offered up a mean culpa to his two previous programs.

“I would like to say thank you to everyone who has been on this journey with me,” Anoma wrote. “It has been very draining emotionally, physically and mentally.  However, I would like to apologize to the staff and my teammates at the University of Alabama as well as at the University of Houston for my actions prior to today.  I am learning [every day] that every action has a consequence, and it is my responsibility to decide whether or not my actions will be positive or negative.  As a young man, I can only take things one day at [a] time and continue to transition into the man [God wants] me to be.

“I want to say thank you to my supporters and family for not giving up on me when things started to get difficult.”

The initial reports of Anoma considering a transfer from Alabama early last year came a little over a month after head coach Nick Saban confirmed that, in the midst of preparing for the College Football Playoff semifinal matchup with Oklahoma, Anoma “had a personal day… to sort some things out.” A tweet around the same time also caused some to think Anoma was considering a transfer, although the player later downplayed such a notion.

A five-star member of the Crimson Tide’s 2018 recruiting class, Anoma, who also considered Maryland and Michigan, was rated as the No. 1 weakside defensive end in the country; the No. 1 player at any position in the state of Maryland; and the No. 4 player overall on 247Sports.com‘s composite board.  Anoma was Alabama’s top-rated signee in that recruiting cycle.

As a true freshman, Anoma played in 11 games and was credited with nine tackles (two for loss), although his role wasn’t as expansive as some thought it’d be.

Anoma didn’t see the field at all for the Cougars this past season as he was forced to sit out the 2019 campaign to satisfy current NCAA bylaws.