Tom Herman

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College Football in Coronavirus Quarantine: On this day in CFT history, including Johnny Manziel leaving Manning Passing Academy and denying his illness was a hangover

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The sports world, including college football, had essentially screeched to a halt in the spring as countries around the world battled the coronavirus pandemic. As such, there was a dearth of college football news as the sport went into a COVID-induced hibernation.  Slowly, though, the game is coming back to life.  Hopefully.

That being said, we thought it might be fun to go back through the CollegeFootballTalk archives that stretch back to 2009 and take a peek at what transpired in the sport on this date.

So, without further ado — ok, one further ado — here’s what happened in college football on July 14, by way of our team of CFT writers both past and present.

(P.S.: If any of our readers have ideas on posts they’d like to read during this college football down-time, leave your suggestions in the comments section.  Mailbag, maybe?)

2019

THE HEADLINE: Conference USA athletic directors have reportedly discussed trading schools with other leagues
THE SYNOPSIS: Most notably, this would’ve involved a realignment that included the Sun Belt Conference.  In the midst of the pandemic, chatter over some sort realignment between the two Group of Fives is still bubbling.

2017

THE HEADLINE: Oregon dismisses star WR Darren Carrington two weeks after DUII arrest
THE SYNOPSIS: This was a significant blow to the Ducks offense.  The year before, Carrington’s 606 yards receiving last year were tops on the team, while his five receiving touchdowns were tied for first.  His 43 catches were second on the team. Carrington subsequently moved on to Utah. After one season with the Utes, Carrington went undrafted.  He signed with Dallas in August of 2018.

2016

THE HEADLINE: Reports of Tom Herman meeting with Baylor labeled ‘completely ridiculous and absolutely false’
THE SYNOPSIS: Then the head coach at Houston, Herman was mentioned as a possible replacement for the disgraced Art Briles.  The Bears job, though, ultimately went to Matt Rhule.  Herman, meanwhile, took the head job at Texas four months later.

2014

THE HEADLINE: CFP unveils new title trophy
THE SYNOPSIS: The College Football Playoff replaced the BCS starting with the 2014 campaign.

2014

THE HEADLINE: Will Muschamp faces hot-seat talk head-on
THE SYNOPSIS: With a 6-5 record at the time, Muschamp was fired by Florida with a game left in the 2014 regular season. A little over a year later, South Carolina hired the Auburn defensive coordinator as its head coach.

2013

THE HEADLINE: Johnny Manziel leaves Manning Academy early; camp denies report of hangover
THE SYNOPSIS: Johnny Football, y’all!

2011

THE HEADLINE: Georgia Tech to vacate ’09 ACC title, placed on four years probation
THE SYNOPSIS: The sanctions revolved around college football players receiving impermissible benefits.

2010

THE HEADLINE: Vandy’s Bobby Johnson retires from coaching; Robbie Caldwell named interim coach
THE SYNOPSIS: That move opened the door for “turkey inseminating crew” to enter the college football lexicon.

2009

THE HEADLINE: Arkansas St. CB Shot, Booted From Team
THE SYNOPSIS: Get shot AND dismissed?  That’s a rough day.  Of course, Paul Stephens was shot while allegedly burglarizing a residence, so there’s that.

Texas DB B.J. Foster suffered fractured hand… by punching the bumper of his own vehicle

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Don’t worry, Mr. Texas Longhorn football player.  Been there, done that myself.  Probably around the time I was your age as well.

Thursday, along with addressing the COVID-19 news that was released Wednesday night, Tom Herman also addressed the status of a handful of his players.  The most interesting note related to B.J. Foster.  According to the Texas head football coach, Foster suffered a broken bone in his hand.  And how did the defensive back break it?  By punching the bumper of his own vehicle.

Per Herman, Foster became angry when he found someone had damaged his car and didn’t leave a note.  So, he took it out on the vehicle.

“We had a long conversation on that,” Herman said according to the Austin American-Statesman. “Every time in my 45 years on the planet when a player gets in a fight with an inanimate object, usually the inanimate object wins.”

Foster was already recovering from offseason shoulder surgery.

According to Herman, Foster will be fitted for a cast.  It won’t, though, preclude him from participating in workouts this summer, Herman stated.

Foster was a five-star member of the Texas football Class of 2018.  The Angleton, Tex. product was rated as the No. 3 safety in the country.  He was also the No. 2 player regardless of position in the Longhorn State.  Only fellow safety Caden Stearns was rated higher than Foster in that year’s class for UT.

His first two years in Austin, Foster started 14 of the 22 games in which he played.  He started eight of nine last season, with the only games missed due to injury.

Texas WR Brennan Eagles tweets he’ll ‘never play another snap’ amid racial injustice, police brutality

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Not sure how I missed this on a very eventful Thursday, but the heartfelt thoughts of a Texas football player deserve to be heard by everyone.

Amidst protests against racial injustice and police brutality, Tom Herman has been one of a handful of head coaches who have been very vocal on issues that directly impact his Longhorn players.  Most of whom are black.

“[I]f you’re going to cheer them and love them for three-and-a-half hours a Saturday in the fall, you better have the same feelings for them off the field, because they’re human beings,” the Texas football coach said earlier this week. “They deserve the same amount of respect and human rights that all of us do in this country when we agreed on the social contract to be a member of the United States.”

In that same conversation, Herman also talked about not censoring any of his players on social media. “[S]ay what’s on your heart. You have a voice. Use it. And you know, I support them in that,” the coach said.

In that vein, UT wide receiver Brennan Eagles took to Twitter very early Thursday morning.  And suggested that he could very well sideline himself from football for the foreseeable future because of the current climate.

Below are the wide receiver’s own words.

Okay so for all my brothers out there that are student-athletes, do you really think athletics should be a man focus right now during this time that we live in? At the end of the day if that is the main focus I find you blind to the fact that your platform can change this.  Thousands of people come to watch for entertainment, revenue is built from that, money is generated from us. If it wasn’t for athletics we wouldn’t have coaches/trainers. Doctors wouldn’t [perform] as many [surgeries], etc. the list goes on. I’ll be [damned] if you think I’ll play another snap with the platform I have that [affects the] majority of people that contribute to the sport who don’t actually play. Know your value is all I’m saying. Athletics brings people together all over but at the end of the day I’m not going to play another snap knowing what’s going on in our society due to color and the system being broken… I just can’t… let’s look at the bigger picture. Don’t care if you yellow or blue that goes for every athlete/supporter out there.

Last season, Brennan was third on the Longhorns in receptions (32) and receiving yards (522).  He was also tied for second on the team in receiving touchdowns (six).  With the departures of Devin Duvernay and Collin Johnson, Brennan will be UT’s leading returning receiver.  If he actually returns, of course.

One final note: Thursday evening, Texas Longhorn football players, coaches and UT staffers, along with members of the University of Texas and City of Austin police departments, marched from Darrell K Royal–Texas Memorial Stadium to the footsteps of the Texas State Capitol building.  In solidarity against racial injustice and police brutality.

“If you fail to realize what’s going on in front of you, when you see it every day, on social media you see how we’ve been viewed throughout history and the way we’ve been treated, you’re close-minded and you’re part of the problem,” safety Caden Sterns said after the march.

“You have to educate yourself. As white people, you got to educate yourself, because it’s right in front of you. All you’ve got to do is just look. The only way not to see this is if you clearly just turn around.

Texas leads all state in first-round picks, but Longhorns and Aggies shut out

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Thirty-two players were taken in last night’s NFL draft first round, says Captain Obvious. While we know LSU won the night in terms of schools, and the SEC in terms of conferences, the state of Texas was the winner in terms of high-school prospects.

A total of seven players who played their high school ball in the Lone Star State heard their name called last night. They were:

No. 3: Ohio State CB Jeff Okudah, Detroit Lions — Grand Prairie, Texas
No. 17: Oklahoma WR CeeDee Lamb, Dallas Cowboys — Richmond, Texas
No. 20: LSU OLB K'Lavon Chaisson, Jacksonville Jaguars — Houston, Texas
No.  21: TCU WR Jalen Reagor, Philadelphia Eagles — Waxahachie, Texas
No. 23: Oklahoma LB Kenneth Murray, Los Angeles Chargers — Missouri City, Texas
No. 27: Texas Tech LB Jordyn Brooks, Seattle Seahawks — Houston, Texas
No. 31: TCU CB Jeff Gladney, Minnesota Vikings — New Boston, Texas

As you’ve no doubt noticed, none of those guys carry Texas or Texas A&M next to their name.

There are reasons for this. As the class of 2017 was making its college decisions, UT was transitioning between Charlie Strong and Tom Herman, and Kevin Sumlin was on his long, slow descent out of College Station.

Texas A&M took a 28-man class that rated 13th in the country, led by 4-star linebacker Anthony Hines and filled with a lot of guys who won’t hear their names called during the draft this year or next. UT signed a 17-man class that placed 25th; 4-star quarterback Sam Ehlinger and 3-star offensive tackle Sam Cosmi will almost certainly be drafted next year.

Okudah was a 5-star prospect who held offers from everyone in the country but was part of a Buckeye exodus joined by 5-star linebacker Baron Browning and 4-star running back JK Dobbins.

Texas was in the hunt for Chaisson down to the end, but the Houston prospect (obviously) picked LSU. Experts said Lamb favored Texas early in the process but Strong was late with an offer.

No one else in the group garnered serious interest from the future first-rounders, to both schools’ regret.