Treon Harris

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Ex-Florida QB Treon Harris leads Tennessee State to first FCS win of the season over an FBS team

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We didn’t have to wait long this season to see a FCS team upset a FBS team.

Former Florida quarterback Treon Harris continued to dominate the Peach state on Saturday night as he guided Tennessee State to a 17-10 upset of Georgia State. Harris, who was 2-0 against Georgia during his time with the Gators, threw for 145 yards and rushed for another 91 yards and a touchdown. Tailback Seth Rowland also chipped in with 76 yards rushing and a score as well.

The loss was particularly brutal for the Panthers to start the year off given what the game was supposed to mean for the school. Head coach Shawn Elliott was making his debut as the new man in charge and the program was playing its first ever game at their recently remodeled Georgia State Stadium, a venue most will recognize as the former Turner Field that used to host the Atlanta Braves.

If there’s one consolation for GSU though, it does not appear they will be alone in the FBS ranks with a loss to a FCS squad and could have some company on Thursday night as well.

Two frosh WRs suspended for Florida’s opener, but Antonio Callaway cleared to play vs. UMass

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Florida has seen its receiving corps suffer some attrition, but the most important and productive component of that group is officially returning.

Jim McElwain confirmed to the media Monday that Antonio Callaway has been cleared to take the field again and will play in the opener this weekend against UMass. The Gators head coach said he learned of the university’s decision this past Friday.

McElwain’s confirmation comes two weeks after a controversial Title IX hearing found the receiver not responsible for an alleged sexual assault.

A former UF student-athlete and current football booster had been assigned to oversee the Title IX hearing involving current Callaway and former UF quarterback Treon Harris, both of whom were accused in January by a woman of sexually assaulting her this past December.  The alleged victim, as well as her parents and potential witnesses on her behalf, boycotted the hearing because of what they perceived as a conflict of interest.

The true sophomore had been suspended not only from the team but from the university since late January for a violation of the Student Conduct Code, later known to involve an alleged sexual assault.  In March, Huntley Johnson, a lawyer well-known in and around Gainesville as the go-to attorney for Gator student-athletes who run into legal issues, issued a statement in which he claimed that the allegation against his non-client “has no merit.”

Johnson released a statement in early June in which he stated that a modified suspension would permit his client to attend classes on campus as well as allow him to use the football team’s practice facilities.  Early on in summer camp, UF confirmed that Callaway will be permitted to practice with the Gators as they await the results of the hearing, which proceeded without the accuser and her witnesses.

Last season in his first year with the Gators, Calloway led the team in receiving yards (678) and tied for the team lead in receiving touchdowns (four). His 19.4 yards per catch led the squad, while his 35 receptions were good for third.

At the end of the regular season, he was named to the All-SEC Freshman team.  Earlier today, he was, not surprisingly, listed as a starting receiver on the depth chart released ahead of the opener.

In addition to the Callaway news, McElwain also confirmed that Tyrie Cleveland and Rick Wells will be suspended for the opener. The true freshmen receivers were arrested in mid-July on a pair of charges related to a BB gun incident that was caught on surveillance video.

Cleveland and Wells are the third and fourth Gators suspended for the opener. It was announced earlier this month that All-SEC cornerback Jalen Tabor and sophomore tight end C'yontai Lewis would miss the opener because of what turned out to be a fight during practice between the two players.

Florida WR Antonio Callaway found not responsible in Title IX sexual assault hearing

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For the second time in as many days, a player from an SEC school has found his path cleared for a return to the playing field.  This decision, though, is likely to cause additional controversy and raised eyebrows.

The attorney for Antonio Callaway confirmed Friday that his client has been found not responsible for sexual assault in a Title IX hearing conducted by the University of Florida’s student conduct and conflict resolution office.

It was reported last week that a former UF student-athlete and current football booster had been assigned to oversee the Title IX hearing involving current Callaway and former UF quarterback Treon Harris, both of whom were accused in January by a woman of sexually assaulting her this past December.  The alleged victim, as well as her parents and potential witnesses on her behalf, boycotted the hearing scheduled for last Friday because of what they perceived as a conflict of interest.

The attorney for the alleged victim, who didn’t report the alleged assault to either university or Gainesville police, stated in a letter to state’s attorney Bill Cervone that “[o]ne of the main reasons why my client did not report to law enforcement is that she was informed that you are loathe to prosecute a sexual assault against a Gator football player and now you have loudly confirmed just that.” Cervone responded by stating that, “[b]ased on what I knew then, I didn’t think there was even a remote possibility of criminal charges.”

John Clune, the alleged victim’s attorney, labeled Cervone’s comments as an “inappropriate and unethical abuse of your position.” In response, Callaway’s lawyer, Huntley Johnson, labeled Clune’s comments as “an attempt at intimidation.

Controversy aside, the ruling today clears the path for Callaway to return to the field for the opener early next month.  Last week, the wide receiver returned to practice with his Gator teammates, although head coach Jim McElwain declined to address his status for the start of the season.

Callaway had been suspended not only from the team but from the university since late January for a violation of the Student Conduct Code, later known to involve an alleged sexual assault.  In March, Johnson, a lawyer well-known in and around Gainesville as the go-to attorney for Gator student-athletes who run into legal issues, issued a statement in which he claimed that the allegation against his non-client “has no merit.”

Johnson released a statement in early June in which he stated that a modified suspension would permit his client to attend classes on campus as well as allow him to use the football team’s practice facilities.  A handful of days ago, UF confirmed that Callaway will be permitted to practice with the Gators as they await the results of the hearing, which proceeded without the accuser and her witnesses.

Getting Callaway back would be a significant boon for UF’s offensive hopes in 2016.

Last season in his first year with the Gators, Calloway led the team in receiving yards (678) and tied for the team lead in receiving touchdowns (four). His 19.4 yards per catch led the squad, while his 35 receptions were good for third.

At the end of the regular season, he was named to the All-SEC Freshman team.

Florida state’s attorney: ‘didn’t think there was even a remote possibility of criminal charges’ against Gator players

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A controversy that Florida would love nothing more than to go away continues on unabated.

Eyebrows were significantly raised last week when it was reported that a former UF student-athlete and current football booster had been assigned to oversee the Title IX hearing involving current UF wide receiver Antonio Callaway and former UF quarterback Treon Harris, both of whom were accused in January by a woman of sexually assaulting her this past December.  The alleged victim, as well as her parents and potential witnesses on her behalf, boycotted the hearing scheduled for last Friday because of what they perceived as a conflict of interest.

The attorney for the alleged victim, who didn’t report the alleged assault to either university or Gainesville police, stated in a letter to state’s attorney Bill Cervone that “[o]ne of the main reasons why my client did not report to law enforcement is that she was informed that you are loathe to prosecute a sexual assault against a Gator football player and now you have loudly confirmed just that.” Monday, Cervone attempted to explain to both ESPN.com

I had a conversation with officers at the university to see whether it was going to come this way,” said Cervone, who said his office never fully investigated the allegations. “Based on what I knew then, I didn’t think there was even a remote possibility of criminal charges. It would have been totally unprosecutable based on the facts given to me. It would have never risen to sexual assault or sexual battery.

… and the Orlando Sentinel

I was told no at that point there was no likelihood of any case being brought to us,” Cervone told the Orlando Sentinel Monday. “Based on my memory of our discussions at that point in time, that did not surprise me at all.

“I was never told anything that would make me think there was a prosecutable claim of sexual assault or sexual battery or anything along those lines.

… why charges were never filed in the alleged incident.

John Clune, the alleged victim’s attorney, labeled Cervone’s comments as an “inappropriate and unethical abuse of your position.” In response, Callaway’s lawyer, Huntley Johnson, labeled Clune’s comments as “an attempt at intimidation.”

Callaway had been suspended not only from the team but from the university since late January for a violation of the Student Conduct Code, later known to involve an alleged sexual assault.  In March, Johnson, a lawyer well-known in and around Gainesville as the go-to attorney for Gator student-athletes who run into legal issues, issued a statement in which he claimed that the allegation against his non-client “has no merit.”

Johnson released a statement in early June in which he stated that a modified suspension would permit his client to attend classes on campus as well as allow him to use the football team’s practice facilities.  A handful of days ago, UF confirmed that Callaway will be permitted to practice with the Gators as they await the results of the hearing, which proceeded without the accuser and her witnesses.

Harris last month decided to transfer from the Gators, and has drawn interest from at least a couple of Power Five programs.

Florida QB-turned-WR Treon Harris to transfer

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Last week Florida head coach Jim McElwain confirmed Treon Harris will move from quarterback to wide receiver.

“Everybody has freedom, he doesn’t have to stay there,” McElwain said, via SEC Country. “But at the end of the day, look, we’re in this not here to hurt anybody’s feelings. But at the same time, it is what it is and we’ve got four guys who I’m really proud of. The room is really good and I’m excited about it.”

McElwain may not have wanted to hurt Harris’s feelings, but he may not have minded Harris taking a hint.

As first reported by Ryan Bartow of Gator Bait and later confirmed by the program, Harris has picked up what McElwain put down.

Harris, rated the No. 9 athlete nationally coming out of powerhouse Booker T. Washington High School in Miami, would have a myriad of options should he be open to playing a position other than quarterback. But, then again, if he wanted to play somewhere other than under center, one assumes he’d have stayed at Florida in the first place.

Florida’s leading returning passer — he completed 119-of-235 throws for 1,676 yards and nine touchdowns with six interceptions, good for a quarterback rating that placed 92nd nationally — Harris would have two years of eligibility remaining should he opt to remain at the FBS level.