Colin Kaepernick

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Dabo Swinney the latest to tell people how and when to protest the national anthem

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OK, let’s get this out of the way. Anything related to national anthem protests is going to be a hot button issue, and that is perfectly OK. It is open discussion that helps promote actual change on any number of subjects. When San Francisco 49ers and former Nevada quarterback Colin Kaepernick made headlines and turned heads by choosing to protest the national anthem for what he suggested were social inequalities, he got praised and roasted for it depending on what side o the line you stand. In the recent weeks the discussion has at times trickled into the college football world, and it did once again on Tuesday when Clemson head coach Dabo Swinney was asked if he would punish any player for sitting during the playing of the national anthem before a game.

Of course, keep in mind, it is not typical for most college football players to even be on the field at the time the national anthem is performed, as most generally are in the locker room while the marching band is on the field for the pregame routine. Alas, Swinney responded and then used the opportunity to expand on his thoughts, perhaps a little too long for his own good.

“The only thing I’m going to discipline my player for is things within this team and the team rules, holding everybody accountable to the standard,” Swinney said, according to The Post and Courier. “Guys want to be part of things, I just think they should do it on their own time, and outside of the team framework. That’s just my opinion.”

It was also Swinney’s opinion that those who do sit during the national anthem are being a distraction to the team. Swinney went on to suggest there is a time and a place to voice your opinions, which may not be received very well by some. A rich white man telling others how and when to protest is how it comes off, and that pretty much supports the reasoning behind such a protest movement in the first place.

“I don’t think it’s good to be a distraction to your team,” Swinney said. “I don’t think it’s good to use the team as the platform. I totally disagree with that. Nobody’s really asked me about Kaepernick or whatever. I totally disagree with that. Not his protest, but I just think there’s a right way to do things and I don’t think two wrongs make a right. Never have, never will. And I think that it just creates more divisiveness, more division.”

Swinney may be right about that to an extent, as the dividing lines have certainly been drawn on this particular subject, even if some people are stepping foot on one side of the line for reasons beyond the actual purpose for the national anthem protest. Swinney then used his role as head coach of Clemson to recite a couple of lessons from the Bible to support his case, and .used Martin Luther King Jr’s mission and cited President Barack Obama winning two elections and black quarterbacks and coaches in football to continue padding his case. It’s at this point Swinney probably went on a little too long to try and drive home a point. These examples in our society do nothing to suggest the black population in this country is on equal footing in our societies, and citing these examples ends up coming off disingenuous to those who may support the national anthem protests.

Swinney seems like a good man, and by all accounts he is. This does not change that in any way, because it is clear Swinney is using his voice to promote an open discussion and shares his sentiments about what is going on in this world. But don’t tell people how and when to protest, and don’t use black quarterbacks as a means for suggesting there is a level ground in the social justice world in which we live.

All Swinney had to do was say he would not discipline any player. Sometimes less is more.

Before heading to NFL Combine, Winston and Petty get advice from Harbaugh

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The NFL Combine gets started today with college football’s best NFL prospects getting set to show off and work out in front of the eyes of the league’s top scouts and coaches from every NFL franchise. It’s a pretty big deal, and there is no real down time for players. Aside from workouts and getting measurements taken, players are interviewed by coaches and franchise executives as teams look for the next players to draft in the upcoming NFL Draft. Being prepared for the grueling event is critical for some players, and getting advice from those who have been through the process is always wise.

This morning, before heading to Indianapolis, Florida State’s Heisman Trophy quarterback Jameis Winston and Baylor’s record-setting quarterback Bryce Petty did just that up in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Michigan head coach Jim Harbaugh provided some insight and advice for both players Tuesday morning from inside Schembechler Hall.

Winston is expected to be one of the top players drafted in the 2015 NFL Draft. Petty may be the third quarterback drafted behind Winston and Oregon’s Marcus Mariota, but could be in need of a strong showing at the combine to improve his draft stock.

Harbaugh has some fresh NFL insight of course, as the former head coach of the San Francisco 49ers, and his previous work with players like Andrew Luck and Colin Kaepernick command respect from a pair of quarterbacks looking to take their game to the next level. Noticeably, although more likely just ironically, absent from this picture? Michigan quarterback Devin Gardner.

The Fifth Quarter: Week 13 Rewind

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As is the case each and every season, each and every week, any omission below is not on purpose, it’s merely intentional.

HISTORIC REPEAT
As it turns out, while Samaje Perine made history, the timeframe in which he did it wasn’t historically unprecedented.

In Oklahoma’s win over Kansas, Perine set the FBS single-game rushing record with 427 yards.  That performance broke the record of 408 set a week ago by Wisconsin’s Melvin Gordon.  Most assumed Perine’s breaking of a rushing record that was a week old had never happened before; Anthony Thompson would point out what the word “assume” makes out of all involved.

Back on Nov. 11, 1989, the Indiana running back’s 377 yards broke the previous mark of 357 yards.  That record was first set by Washington State’s Rueben Mayes in 1984 and tied by Cal State Fullerton’s Mike Pringle on Nov. 4, 1989, exactly one week before Thompson broke it.

Below is how the FBS rushing record has progressed over the past four-plus decades:

347 — Ron Johnson, Michigan, 1968
350 — Eric Allen, Michigan State, 1971
356 — Eddie Lee Ivery, Georgia Tech, 1978
357 — Rueben Mayes, Washington State, 1984
357 — Mike Pringle, Cal State Fullerton, 1989
377 — Anthony Thompson, Indiana, 1989
386 — Marshall Faulk, San Diego State, 1991
396 — Tony Sands, Kansas, 1991
406 — LaDainian Tomlinson, TCU, 1999
408 — Melvin Gordon, Wisconsin, 2014
427 — Samaje Perine, Oklahoma, 2014

Perine was also second to Thompson in something else — percentage increase of the previous record.  Thompson bested the old mark by 5.6 percent;  Perine, meanwhile, topped Gordon’s week-old record by 4.7 percent.

Some would say, though, the most impressive record belongs to Gordon.  The Badger back did his record-setting damage in three quarters of work and on just 25 carries; the only other players on that list with less than 30 carries were Ivery (26) and Allen (29).  Gordon’s 16.2 yards per carry is easily the best mark among the group, with only Ivery (13.7) within three yards.   Perine did average 12.6 ypc, the third-best among that group of 11 players.

At the opposite end of the yards-per-carry spectrum were Thompson and Sands, who averaged 7.25 yards on 52 carries and 6.8 yards on 58 carries, respectively.

Of course, Perine is the only true freshman to break the record… and he did it in three quarters plus two fourth-quarter plays after not starting a game played in the rain… and he is the only player to rush for 200-plus yards in both halves of a game, all of which makes his performance arguably the greatest of all-time regardless of how you attempt to parse out the numbers.

PROJECTING CFP TOP FOUR
Unlike previous weeks, there was no upheaval around the top of the College Football Playoff Top 25 in Week 14.  The highest-ranked team to lose was No. 8 Ole Miss, and, with two losses, it’s unlikely the Rebels were a realistic playoff option to begin with.

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Week 11, Statistically Speaking

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A statistical snapshot of the week that was in college football…

-9 — Rushing yards for Northwestern in the one-point loss to Michigan.  Quarterback Trevor Siemian totaled minus-37 yards rushing, while the Wildcats’ leading rusher, Justin Jackson, had plus-35.

.844 — Overall career winning percentage (54-10, fifth season) for Florida State’s Jimbo Fisher, the best for any ACC head coach with three or more seasons.  His winning percentage of .842 in ACC games is best of all-time, ahead of the legend he replaced at FSU, Bobby Bowden (.814).

1.3 — Interceptions for Louisville’s Gerod Holliman after a three-pick performance against Boston College.  Holliman now has 12 interceptions with two regular season games and a bowl game remaining; the all-time FBS record for interceptions in a season is 14 by Washington’s Al Worley in 1968.  Incidentally, there are only 17 FBS teams with more interceptions this season than Holliman.

2 — FBS players and who have accounted for more than 9,000 yards passing and 3,000 yards rushing in a career, and both played at Nevada: Cody Fajardo (9,084 and 3,025, 2011-present) and Colin Kaepernick (10,098 and 4,112, 2007-10). Kaepernick’s 14,210 yard of total offense is No. 1 in FBS history, while Fajardo’s (12,109) is currently 16th.

2 — Rushing touchdowns allowed by Alabama’s defense this season, the fewest in the FBS.  Next lowest?  Utah’s allowed five.

2-7 — Record of teams the game after playing Navy this season.  That includes Notre Dame’s second loss of the season, a 55-31 decision to Arizona State this weekend.

Tevin Coleman
Tevin Coleman

3 — Weeks in a row a player from Rutgers’ opponent has been named as the Big Ten’s Player of the Week.  That streak temporarily came to an end this week as the Scarlet Knights are on a bye, although Indiana — and the nation’s second-leading rusher Tevin Coleman — await next week and could easily extend the streak to four straight.

4-3 — Touchdowns vs. incompletions for Hutson Mason in Georgia’s blowout win over Kentucky.

5 — FBS players who have ever totaled 200-plus yards rushing and 100-plus yards receiving in a single game: Brian Hill, Wyoming vs. Fresno State, Nov. 1, 2014 (281 rushing, 106 receiving); Donald Buckram, UTEP vs. Tulane, Nov. 7, 2009 (234, 109); Steve Slaton, West Virginia vs. Pittsburgh, Nov. 16, 2006 (215, 130); Emmett White, Utah St. vs. New Mexico St., Nov. 4, 2000 (322, 134); and Thomas Jones, Virginia vs. Buffalo, Nov. 13, 1999 (221, 110).

10.1 — Ohio State’s J.T. Barrett leads the FBS in passing touchdown percentage (26 TDs on 233 attempts; 11.1 percent).

11 — Games in a row Oregon’s Marcus Mariota has thrown two or more touchdown passes, the longest such streak for an FBS quarterback.

13.1Nick Chubb‘s yards per carry average as he ran for 170 yards on just 13 rushes in Georgia’s blowout win over Kentucky.

14 — 300-yard passing games for Baylor’s Bryce Petty, breaking the school record of 13 previously held by Heisman winner Robert Griffin III.

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Pregame reading: Grantland’s Chris Brown on Gus Malzahn

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For most of the United States, it’s freezing cold today and the thought of going outside sounds just awful. So if you’re curled up on your couch waiting for the BCS Championship to kick off, take the time to read Chris Brown’s excellent Grantland story on how Gus Malzahn’s diabolical offense came to be.

This part stood out:

The most dangerous wrinkle in Auburn’s offense this season, however, has been providing Marshall with more protection when he keeps the ball. As the zone-read has become increasingly popular over the last several years, defenses have devised a variety of ways to defend it, often by confusing and overwhelming the quarterback.

Malzahn and Lashlee have countered those defensive responses by borrowing a concept from Chris Ault’s Nevada offense, one the San Francisco 49ers in turn borrowed and expanded upon once former Ault pupil Colin Kaepernick became their quarterback: namely, using tight ends, H-backs, and fullbacks to “arc block” linebackers and safeties who crash when the quarterback keeps the ball on the zone-read.

There are gifs and diagrams and the like in the article. Go read it if you want a better understanding of what you’re watching tonight.