Dylan Moses

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Butkus Award names 51 linebackers to 2018 watch list

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College football watch list season resumed Monday with the release of the Butkus Award and Jim Thorpe Award watch lists. The Butkus Award watch list named 51 linebackers to its preseason list, including players from 41 different schools.

This year’s watch list is highlighted by finalists for the 2017 Butkus Award in Devin Bush of Michigan and T.J. Edwards of Wisconsin. Josh Allen of Kentucky and Cameron Smith of USC are also on the list after being a semi-finalist last year. Former high school Butkus Award winners Caleb Kelly of Oklahoma and Dylan Moses of Alabama also were named to the list.

Alabama and Wisconsin lead the nation with three Butkus Award watch list players each. Ryan Connelly and Andrew Van Ginkel join Edwards of Wisconsin and Anfernee Jennings and Mack Wilson of Alabama are also included.

The list will be trimmed down to a list of semi-finalists on October 29 and then down to a smaller list of finalists on November 19. Georgia running back Roquan Smith won the award last year.

2018 Butkus Award Watch List

Curtis Akins, Memphis
Otaro Alaka, Texas A&M
Josh Allen, Kentucky
Jeffrey Allison, Fresno State
Azeez Al-Shaair, Florida Atlantic
Joe Bachie, Michigan State
Markus Bailey, Purdue
Thomas Barber, Minnesota
Bryton Barr, Massachusetts
Tevis Bartlett, Washington
Devin Bush, Michigan
Josh Buss, Montana
Te’von Coney, Notre Dame
Ryan Connelly, Wisconsin
Deshaun Davis, Auburn
Troy Dye, Oregon
Koa Farmer, Penn State
Paddy Fisher, Northwestern
Joe Giles-Harris, Duke
Dre Greenlaw, Arkansas
Porter Gustin, USC
Nate Hall, Northwestern
Terez Hall, Missouri
Terrill Hanks, New Mexico State
Darius Harris, Middle Tennessee
De’Jon Harris, Arkansas
Khalil Hodge, Buffalo
Justin Hollins, Oregon
Oluwaseun Idowu, Pitt
Anfernee Jennings, Alabama
Gary Johnson, Texas
Kendall Joseph, Clemson
Caleb Kelly, Oklahoma
Jordan Kunaszyk, California
Tre Lamar, Clemson
Dylan Moses, Alabama
Bobby Okereke, Stanford
Justin Phillips, Oklahoma State
Germaine Pratt, N.C. State
Shaq Quarterman, Miami
David Reese, Florida
Cameron Smith, USC
Ty Summers, TCU
Jahlani Tavai, Hawaii
Drue Tranquill, Notre Dame
Andrew Van Ginkel, Wisconsin
D’Andre Walker, Georgia
Devin White, LSU
Mack Wilson, Alabama
Juwon Young, Marshall

LB Dylan Moses, once offered scholarship in eighth grade, signs financial aid agreement with Alabama

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Alabama is already well on its way to putting together another so-called recruiting national championship for the Class of 2017. The Crimson Tide have the top-ranked recruiting class for 2017 on the board according to Rivals, and now one four-star linebacker is officially locked in for good. Dylan Moses from IMG Academy in Bradenton, Florida, committed to Nick Saban and Alabama earlier in the fall, and now he has announced (via Twitter) he has submitted his financial aid agreement with the university.

Rivals ranks Moses as a four-star linebacker, although other recruiting outlets have him as high as a five-star prospect. Either way, Alabama is likely getting a very talented linebacker to join their defense, which should come as no surprise any more. It is essentially expected Alabama will have a good healthy stable of four and five-star recruits at just about every position on the team as a result of being a proven national title contender on an annual basis and being a manufacturing plant for NFL talent.

Moses is expected to enroll at Alabama in January, which will allow him to get a jump on getting involved with the offseason workouts in Tuscaloosa and participate in spring football. Moses was previously offered a scholarship from Alabama when he was in eighth grade (LSU offered him the summer before). Moses was previously committed to LSU but de-committed over the summer.

LSU loses No. 1 recruit in Class of 2017 (for now), but track record suggests Tigers win it back

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When a recruit from a recruiting class two classes away commits from a school it is rarely much of a shock. This one is a little bit different. Dylan Moses, the nation’s top-rated recruit in the Class of 2017 and a Baton Rouge native, has decommitted from LSU. The top-ranked recruit from Baton Rouge backing away from LSU? That seems odd.

Moses took to Twitter to explain the decision he and his family came to recently, in which he stressed this being a once in a lifetime opportunity that he wants to live out to the fullest. And who can blame him? As talented as he is, Moses will be given star treatment wherever he goes while on the recruiting trail, and we should all be so lucky to receive such treatment from any college football program you wish. He did say, at one point, LSU remains his No. 1 school on the list (and having his cousin, Corey Raymond, on the coaching staff certainly helps).

LSU has been in on the recruiting of Moses for a while now. Moses was extended a scholarship offer from Les Miles in 2012 just after starting high school. LSU extending (and accepting) offers from the youngest talent on the recruiting boards is nothing new, and episodes like this should not be unexpected. Recruiting is a tense process for any player to go through.

Moses is ranked by Rivals as the number one athlete in the nation, and the number two overall player in the Class of 2017. He is also the top-rated recruit in the state of Louisiana, just for good measure. As you might suspect, Moses holds offers from a ton of programs from coast to coast, including Alabama, Clemson, Florida State, Georgia, Ohio State, Tennessee, USC and so many more.

LSU may still land the commitment of Moses. The last time the top recruit in the state of Louisiana did not go to LSU was in the Class of 2012, with Alabama swaying Landon Collins away out of Geismar (much to the dismay of his mother). Since 2002, LSU has not landed the top recruit from within the state just three times. Quarterback Robert Lane committed to Ole Miss in 2003 and running back Joe McKnight ended up at USC in the Class of 2007. So the track record is good for LSU, as the Tigers have been dominant with in-state talent over the last decade.