Photo by John Weast/Getty Images

TCU QB race appears to continue after spring game

Leave a comment

The teams that are able to nail down a starting quarterback by the end of the spring football season are the fortunate ones. Unless there is a returning starter in the fold, the competition more often than not carries over to the summer unless there is a clear and definitive leader in the clubhouse. After TCU’s chilly spring game on Saturday, head coach Gary Patterson appears ready to move forward letting this competition play out a little more before the start of the 2018 season.

“The quarterbacks have been OK,” Patterson said after TCU’s spring scrimmage on Saturday, according to The Dallas Morning News. “We threw too many picks today.”

Shawn Robinson, the most likely quarterback to end up getting the starting job in the fall and replace Kenny Hill, split playing time with Michael Collins and Grayson Muehlstein. All three had a pass intercepted by the TCU defense, leaving Patterson less-than-enthusiastic about going all in on any of his passing candidates. Though not panicking by any stretch of the imagination, Patterson is aware he has a few players trying hard, and sometimes that leads to trying to do too much to gain an edge.

“You gotta understand as a quarterback and players, you just need to make the players you’re supposed to make, and the great plays take care of themselves,” Patterson said.

TCU, like every college football program in the country (including even Alabama) has plenty of time to figure out who the starting quarterback will be. Expect this decision to be made much later in the summer, if not just before the start of the season. TCU opens the 2018 season at home against Southern on Sept. 1.

Former TCU player sues TCU, Big 12 for alleged abuse and harassment

Max Faulkner/Star-Telegram via AP
3 Comments

Kolby Listenbee, a former wide receiver at TCU, has filed a lawsuit taking aim at the university and Big 12 for alleged abuse and harassment he claims never allowed him to fully recover from an injury that may have impacted his professional career outlook in the NFL. In the lawsuit, Listenbee mentioned TCU head coach Gary Patterson and former offensive coordinator Doug Meachum in accusing the members of the football coaching staff of pressuring him to get back on the field as quickly as possible.

TCU has not specifically commented on the lawsuit, which is the standard operating procedure for any university in this situation, but did issue a brief statement saying the school “takes pride in its long-standing tradition of excellence in providing a positive experience for its student-athletes, especially in the areas of care, prevention and rehabilitation of athletic injuries,” per The Star-Telegram in Fort Worth, Texas.

Per Listenbee’s lawsuit, the former Horned Frog claims he injured his pelvic bones in a game against SMU in 2015. The injury involved torn cartilage that is said to take a minimum of six months to rehab. Listenbee claims members of TCU’s training staff injected him with pain medications and steroids to ease the pain and allow him to continue playing. The pain meds and what Listenbee claims to be a “lack of rest and abuse from the coaching staff” eventually led to having to have metal plate inserted in his bone, which effectively hurt his chances of getting off to a successful NFL career.

Listenbee was drafted in the sixth round of the 2016 NFL draft by the Buffalo Bills after previously suffering a groin injury at the NFL Scouting Combine. Listenbee was waived by the Bills a year later due to ongoing injury concerns. Listenbee later signed with the Miami Dolphins in October 2016 and was again waived in early December. A week later, Listenbee signed with the Indianapolis Colts to be on the practice squad, where he currently is under contract as a reserve.

The lawsuit also takes aim at the Big 12 for what Listenbee claims to be a failure to review TCU’s compliance with NCAA rules and policies regarding injury practices.

Gary Patterson says Texas schools should be embarrased for not having a top 25 team

Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images
6 Comments

At the end of the 2016 season, not one team from the state of Texas could be found in the final AP poll, the coaches poll or the final College Football Playoff ranking. That is an embarrassment to the entire state of Texas, according to TCU head coach Gary Patterson.

As he spoke to the media at Big 12 media days from the luxurious training home of the Dallas Cowboys, Patterson dove into why the state of Texas has been lagging behind the competition in college football. While noting the changing recruiting landscape that has developed since Texas A&M’s departure from the Big 12 to the SEC, Patterson said all of the schools in the state of Texas should feel embarrassed about the current situation on the field.

“I think A&M going to the SEC hurt us a little bit because you have that common factor,” Patterson explained after suggesting the internet has had an impact on how recruiting process unfolds now as well. “I think the Big 12’s learning it’s helping us because we’re now leaving the state to be able to get kids to come into the state. But we should be embarrassed we don’t have a team in the top 25. There’s a lot of good football players, even that come to our schools, that can play and play at a high level, and we need to play better. It’s simple as that.”

Patterson is not off on this thought process. Texas A&M leaving the Big 12 for the SEC certainly impacted how recruiting goes down. The doors to the state of Texas had always been open to SEC schools, but now recruits are seeing more and more interest from the SEC as a result of the Aggies moving to a conference in a new region, and one that has been quite successful over the years while the Big 12 as a whole has trended downward. At the same time, it has become increasingly important for schools from Texas to take advantage of the new recruiting opportunities presented to them by Texas A&M opening the doors to the southeast and along the east coast. The success rate just has not been there for those schools to capitalize on it, and more recruits from Texas are opting to going elsewhere. This even happens within the Big 12, where Oklahoma can pluck some top talent out of the state of Texas as well.

The future does look to be an interesting one with new coaches coming in with the intent on taking back some of that in-state swagger. Tom Herman at Texas and Matt Rhule at Baylor have their work cut out for them, but each come to their new programs with some decent experience in handling the projects in front of them from their former gigs. And one should never cast doubt on Patterson, who has been around long enough to understand what it takes to adapt and win.

Helmet sticker to Land Grant Gauntlet for the transcribed quote.

Gary Patterson rips Big 12 officials, takes veiled shot at Baker Mayfield

Photo by Tom Pennington/Getty Images
9 Comments

To say TCU head coach Gary Patterson was not happy after his Horned Frogs dropped a home Big 12 game against Oklahoma would be a bit of an understatement. He was ticked and firing shots at the Big 12 officiating in the game in his postgame comments, and he even took a shot at Sooners quarterback Baker Mayfield.

Patterson was not pleased with a sequence toward the end of the game that ultimately resulted in an intentional grounding penalty on his quarterback Kenny Hill. Making the moment even more infuriating was the fact the initial call was for no intentional grounding, which was soon overturned by the officials on the field after a brief discussion after Oklahoma head coach Bob Stoops threw his headset down in anger and lobbied for the call.

“The bottom line to it is, in his estimation, [Hill] didn’t have anyone to throw to,” Patterson said, referring to the official who threw the initial flag for intentional grounding. “Mine was he got hit, so I don’t know how he can tell he couldn’t throw it to him.”

Patterson also lamented over some missed holding calls on Oklahoma, which every coach can probably gloss over following a game. But what was a bit eye-opening was what Patterson appeared to say in relation to Mayfield.

“We talk about sportsmanship in this game, and I’ve got a quarterback that writes a whole article on me, how I treated him wrong. But I can’t talk about officials. Bottom line to it is, I wasn’t happy with the officiating.”

Last December, Mayfield shared his side of the story about his previous recruitment process with TCU. According to Mayfield, TCU was going to offer him a scholarship that never came his way.

They kind of hung me out to dry right before signing day,” Mayfield said in an interview with USA Today, suggesting Patterson does not like him. Mayfield ended up walking on at Texas Tech before ultimately transferring to Oklahoma. Mayfield is now 3-0 against TCU.

It would appear Patterson has a bit of a chip on his shoulder, and a 3-2 record with two home losses can do that to a coach. TCU will get a chance to bounce back and get back in the Big 12 hunt this week when they head to Kansas before taking on West Virginia on the road on October 22 (after a bye week).

QB Trevone Boykin suspended for Alamo Bowl, bringing unceremonious end to TCU career

AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez
30 Comments

Following a bar fight that led to TCU quarterback Trevone Boykin allegedly striking a police officer, TCU has suspended its starting quarterback for the Alamo Bowl against Oregon. Wide receiver Preston Miller has also been suspended for the game. Both players have suspended under the vague terms of violations of team rules, although you can connect the dots for Boykin’s suspension.

“Trevone Boykin and Preston Miller have been suspended for Saturday’s game due to a violation of team rules, ” a statement from TCU head coach Gary Patterson said Thursday morning. “We are disappointed in their actions and apologize to the TCU Horned Frogs Nation, Valero Alamo Bowl and city of San Antonio.”

Boykin was arrested early Thursday morning in San Antonio after striking a bicycle patrol officer following a bar fight. According to reports, Boykin was being harassed by patrons who recognized him at a bar when things got heated and Boykin struck a patron at the bar. Boykin and his friends were forced to leave the establishment, but trouble continued outside the bar. A police officer on a bicycle wrestled Boykin to the ground after Boykin allegedly attempted to swing at multiple officers on the scene. Boykin was charged for assaulting a police officer, resisting arrest and public intoxication. The suspension from the game brings an unceremonious end to the college career of Boykin, a senior, and could have a negative impact on his draft stock heading into the draft cycle. Basically, this could not have happened at a worst time for Boykin.

Boykin was a preseason Heisman Trophy candidate according to many, although injuries and losses in conference play took him out of the running despite a season with 3,575 passing yards and 31 touchdowns to go along with 612 rushing yards. Boykin helped lead a renewed TCU offense to a share of the Big 12 title in 2014, passing for 3,901 yards and 33 touchdowns with just 10 interceptions and 707 rushing yards and eight rushing touchdowns. Miller has appeared in four games this season, in which he has one catch for six yards.

TCU is scheduled to play Oregon in the Alamo Bowl on Saturday, January 2. Oregon was a slight one-point favorite, and that line should grow more in favor of the Ducks.