Kyle Whittingham

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Utah lands former four-star QB Cameron Rising from Longhorns

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Just days after making an official visit to Utah, it appears Cameron Rising liked what he saw. Rising announced he has decided to transfer to Utah after previously deciding not to return to Texas, as first reported by UteZone.

Rising was a four-star pro-style quarterback recruit in the Class of 2018 for the Texas Longhorns. He had committed to the Longhorns in 2017 after previously committing to Oklahoma, but it did not appear he was going to get a chance to play much for Texas with Sam Ehlinger standing in the way. Ehlinger’s role in the Texas offense also led to the decision of Shane Buechele to enter the NCAA transfer portal as well.

Rising did not play for the Longhorns in 2018 and used a redshirt to preserve four years of eligibility. However, he will still have to sit out the 2019 season due to NCAA transfer rules and will not be eligible to play again until 2020. At that time, Rising will have three years of eligibility at his disposal. That timing could work out for the Utes as Tyler Huntley will be back for his senior season in Salt Lake City this fall.

Before Rising steps right into the starting role, however, he may have to beat out Jason Shelley for the job in 2020. Shelley had an up-and-down freshman season in relief of Huntley that didn’t inspire a tremendous amount of confidence in the future of the passing game for Utah. That may have been why Kyle Whittingham pursued the transfer of Rising once the former four-star recruit became an option.

CFT Previews: San Diego County Credit Union Holiday Bowl

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WHO: No. 17 Utah (9-4) vs. No. 22 Northwestern (8-5)
WHAT: The 41st San Diego County Credit Union Holiday Bowl
WHEN: 7:00 p.m. ET on FS1
WHERE: SDCCU Stadium, San Diego, CA
THE SKINNY: While the Rose Bowl gets the champions of the Big Ten and Pac-12 this season, it is the Holiday Bowl that gets the runners-up for a fun little matchup between Northwestern and Utah. Both schools are making their first trip to the long-standing bowl game.

The great unknown for Utah is the status of quarterback Tyler Huntley. Huntley was thought to be lost for the season due to a collarbone injury, but he has been available for practices and has not been ruled out for the Holiday Bowl. In fact, Kyle Whittingham has refused to name a starter, which suggests there is a chance that not only will Huntley play, but he could even get the starting nod for the Utes offense. If Huntley can be available, that would be a nice lift for a Utah offense as he is the more dependable option compared to backup Jason Shelley.

Northwestern will know they have Clayton Thorson leading their offense, but he can be streaky in good ways and bad. Against a steady Utah defense, that could be an ominous sign. Look for the Wildcats to try getting freshman running back Isaiah Bowser going, but Utah will be focused on stopping the Northwestern running game to force Thorson to try beating them through the air. That may be a risk they are willing to take.

THE LINE: Utah -7.0
THE PREDICTION: Utah 30, Northwestern 24

Kyle Whittingham attempts to defend bizarre timeout decision that doomed Utes vs. Washington

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If you went to bed a little early on Saturday night then the chances are pretty good you missed one of the more baffling coaching decisions of the season. With Washington and Utah tied at 30-30 after the Huskies battled back in the second half, Washington received the football with under a minute to play. Washington seemed to be playing for overtime with a short run to keep the clock rolling when Utah head coach Kyle Whittingham called a timeout. This gave Washington head coach Chris Petersen a chance to change the mindset on his sideline and go for the win before overtime, and it led to a game-winning field goal as time expired.

Whittingham essentially gave Washington a chance to win the Huskies had no intention of playing for in regulation, and it may end up costing Utah a spot in a postseason bowl game. After the game, Whittingham defended his decision-making by saying he was attempting to be aggressive, suggesting that if Washington really was playing for overtime, they would have taken a knee.

“You’d have to ask Chris that. But if they were not being aggressive they would have taken a knee,” Whittingham explained. “What’s the point in running a play if they’re not going to try to at least maneuver into field goal range. So we called timeout, had them in decent field position, second and eight or second and nine, and one incomplete pass and another timeout if they decide to run the ball. So it was a long shot, but we’re just trying to win and it obviously didn’t work out.

Here’s the play where Utah called the timeout. It sure seemed as though Washington had no real intention of playing for a field goal unless Utah made a huge mistake, which as it turned out they did,

Whittingham had no legitimate reason to call for the timeout and admitted it was a decision he would take back given the hindsight of knowing how the game would eventually end.

“In hindsight, I probably wouldn’t have called the timeout,” Whittingham said. “But at the time, we were just trying to be aggressive and get the ball back to a guy who has about a sixty-yard range field goal wise.”

Petersen said after the game they were merely trying to run Myles Gaskin to see if there would be a crack or a big play. That never developed, but the timeout changed the situation for Washington. Petersen, not one to go out and trash an opposing coach over a questionable decision that benefits him, said he understood what Whittingham was trying to do.

“We wanted to run the ball and see if we could pop through with Myles and maybe get a 10-yard run,” Petersen said. “I get what Kyle was trying to do. You have to play aggressive in these situations.”

No, you do not.

There is a time to play with aggression, but this was not the time. Washington was settling on playing overtime, and Whittingham overthought the situation and got burned by it.

Kyle Whittingham is confused by Game of Thrones questions on Twitter

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Did you watch Game of Thrones on Sunday night, or are you avoiding spoilers until you can catch it on your DVR later tonight? The hit HBO series unquestionably has a dedicated fanbase. Utah head coach Kyle Whittingham is not among them.

On Monday, with the start of a new season in sight this week, Whittingham was taking questions from fans in a Twitter Q&A. At times, Whittingham seemed puzzled by the questions being thrown his way, and he took the opportunity to let everyone know he was completely clueless when it came to the Game of Thrones questions.

Of course, there were questions about the team and specific players heading into the start of the new season, as well as a question about whether or not he will be keeping his beard, but when it came to

Whittingham eventually had the light turned on with regard to the line of questions ffromsome fans, and which point the Utes head coach confessed to never having seen an episode.

Did Whittingham really not know what the questions were about, or did some savvy Utah staffer let him in on the joke and turn this into an opportunity to gain a little media attention over a fun Q&A to cash in on the Game of Thrones hype? Whatever the case, we can probably safely assume there are a good number of football coaches who are not spending time staying up to date on Game of Thrones. If they don’t even get enjoyment out of solar eclipses, why would they stay plugged into a show about dragons?

Saban, Meyer, Harbaugh, Swinney and more among 19 Dodd Trophy watch list candidates

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When you really think about it, a watch list for a college football award is nothing more than a way to keep public relations staffers in college football programs busy this summer. There’s nothing wrong with that, and it is nice to have a number of key players for the upcoming season highlighted whenever possible (unless you are a Big Ten team going to Big Ten media days). But a watch list is generally pretty pointles sin the long run for most awards. This is especially true for a watch list of college football coaches.

The Dodd Trophy watch list was released today with a list of 19 coaches from many of the top programs around the country. Yep, a watch list for head coaches. Silly, right? It really is the easiest watch list to put together.

The award watch list, compiled by the Chick-fil-A Peach Bowl, includes four coaches from the ACC, Big Ten, Pac-12 and SEC, two coaches from the Big 12 and one from the American Athletic Conference. You know all of the names, like national championship coaches Nick Saban, Urban Meyer, and Dabo Swinney; household names like Jim Harbaugh, Mark Richt, Bill Snyder, and Chris Petersen; and conference championship coaches like David Shaw, James Franklin.

Some notable names not on the list? How about Jimbo Fisher of Florida State? Fisher has a playoff contender in Tallahassee and is the ACC favorite. He also has a national championship ring. Not having Fisher on a preseason watch list for top coaches seems like a bad oversight. Not having new Big 12 coaches Tom Herman (Texas) and Lincoln Riley (Oklahoma) also feels like a swing and a miss if pulling together a list of potential coach of the year candidates. If we are not going to just list all 130 head coaches in FBS, it seems silly to have such a weird collection of watch list candidates when Butch Jones is on the list.

Five coaches on the watch list are former winners of the Dodd Trophy; Snyder, Petersen, Swinney, Saban, and Paul Johnson. Paul Chryst, Ken Niumatalolo, and Petersen were finalists for the award last season as well.

2017 Dodd Trophy Watch List

  • Paul Chryst, Wisconsin
  • James Franklin, Penn State
  • Justin Fuente, Virginia Tech
  • Mike Gundy, Oklahoma State
  • Jim Harbaugh, Michigan
  • Clay Helton, USC
  • Paul Johnson, Georgia Tech
  • Butch Jones, Tennessee
  • Gus Malzahn, Auburn
  • Jim McElwain, Florida
  • Urban Meyer, Ohio State
  • Ken Niumatalolo, Navy
  • Chris Petersen, Washington
  • Mark Richt, Miami
  • Nick Saban, Alabama
  • David Shaw, Stanford
  • Bill Snyder, Kansas State
  • Dabo Swinney, Clemson
  • Kyle Whittingham, Utah