Larry Scott

Photo by Joseph Weiser/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images

Pac-12 follows SEC’s lead with new communications protocols for football officiating

1 Comment

The Pac-12 is taking steps forward to be a more transparent conference when it comes to football officiating in 2019. As part of the promise to deliver a revamped protocol for communications related to officiating, the Pac-12 delivered an outline of just how the conference will handle postgame communications.

The Pac-12 will issue a public statement on any controversial calls regarding game-ending calls or no-calls that impact the result of the game, any call involving a significant error in officiating mechanics, any call involving an error in rules interpretation, or any other extraordinary circumstance (like, say, a marching band and fans rushing the field to celebrate while the opposing team is returning a kickoff). Not that this will make fans of any team feeling robbed of a victory feel any better, but it is good to know the Pac-12 will attempt to hold their officials accountable with instant clarification and interpretations should the Pac-12 Vice President of Officiating feels it necessary to speak publicly on the subject.

The public statements won’t be delayed too long either. The Pac-12 will share any public statements no later than the end of the day following the game, giving the conference time to carefully review the calls and situations as needed.

“We learned a lot from the independent review and I want to thank our subcommittee of athletic directors for overseeing this important work,” Scott said in a released statement. “We are committed to implementing the review recommendations to ensure that our officiating program is as strong as possible. Strengthened replay protocols and increased transparency are essential to this goal.”

The Pac-12 also released a new Centralized Replay Manual that explains the official process and procedures for official reviews. This new outline will go into effect this fall.

It’s important to note, these changes won’t necessarily mean the games are officiated any better, but the conference will at least be taking a baby step forward with trying to uphold the integrity of its officiating within the conference.

The SEC is also trying some new things to improve communication regarding officiating questions this fall. The SEC has already introduced a new Twitter account specifically for officiating clarifications and explanations.

Larry Scott supports 10 P5 games for all P5 members

Photo by Stephen Dunn/Getty Images
3 Comments

Pac-12 commissioner Larry Scott is in an uncomfortable position as the face of the Pac-12. With his conference continuing to lag in the financial department compared to other power conferences and with continued struggles to generate the revenue hoped for with the launch of the Pac-12 Network in recent years, Scott and the Pac-12 are scrambling to find new ways to spark interest and revenue for the conference. In a conversation with members of the media during some spring meetings this week, Scott addressed the future of the conference and its current plans, and also touched on the subject of some sort of scheduling uniformity between the power conferences.

Scott voiced his support for the idea of every power conference requiring its members to play 10 games each season against other power conference competition. The idea being that requiring every member of a power conference to play 10 games against other power conference opponents would compensate for the fact that each power conference either has a different number of members or a different scheduling requirement in place.

For example, the 14-team Big Ten schedules a 9-game conference schedule and requires its members to schedule one additional non-conference game against a power conference opponent. On the other hand, the SEC and ACC each schedule 8-conference games and require a power conference opponent in non-conference play. The Pac-12 plays a nine-game schedule in conference play but does not require its members to schedule power conference opponents (although many end up doing just that anyway). Scott also made clear the Pac-12 was not about to change the way the conference handles its scheduling philosophy any time soon.

In an attempt to level the scheduling playing field by having each member of the ACC, Big 12, Big Ten, Pac-12, and SEC play 10 games overall against power conference opponents, you would be asking more from some conferences than others. And getting everybody on the same page might be a tall order that just will never be fulfilled. In requiring so many games against power conference opponents, you would be asking schools to be making some costly sacrifices by giving up s key home game, which for some schools is a massive revenue generator with the stadiums as big as they are.

Sure, it might make for great TV, and if that’s the case then the TV money may eventually win out, but it will also be cutting non-power conference schools off from some revenue opportunity as well. Fewer games to collect checks from power schools means a decrease in non-power conference revenue streams. The big conferences may not care about that impact though.

If nothing else, Scott’s on board with trying to improve the Pac-12 product, and that’s really all that he is supposed to be doing here.

Pac-12 reportedly turned down offer from ESPN to distribute Pac-12 Network

Photo by Robert Reiners/Getty Images
3 Comments

Given a chance to let ESPN take care of the distribution of the Pac-12 Network alongside the ESPN family of networks that includes the SEC Network and will soon include the ACC Network, the Pac-12 opted to pass. According to a report from Sports Business Daily reporters John Ourand and Michael Smith, ESPN approached the Pac-12 about working out a deal that would extend the media rights package deal between ESPN and the Pac-12 for the better part of the next two decades, but the Pac-12 rejected the offer in hopes of securing a more rewarding media rights deal in the next round of rights negotiations.

The Pac-12 has constantly struggled with getting the Pac-12 Network in as many homes as they likely hoped when the network launched in 2012. Unlike other conference-branded networks, the Pac-12 has retained total ownership of the network, which seemed like a good idea at one point in time. But considering the massive windfall of cash that schools from the Big Ten and SEC get with their conference-branded networks as partnerships with FOX Sports (Big Ten Network) and ESPN (SEC Network) while the Pac-12 continues to have issues getting some carriers to get on board with the Pac-12 Network, perhaps total ownership and decision-making with regard to operating and distribution should be on the table for discussion for the Pac-12.

The Pac-12’s current media rights agreement with ESPN and FOX will expire in 2024, and a consultant has already been hired to help out with the negotiations to come. What exactly the media landscape will look like at that point remains difficult to predict. As more and more consumers are choosing to cut the cord, the oversaturation of streaming platforms leaves plenty of possibilities for what the future holds, including a brand new announcement from Apple today about their future Apple TV plans. The Pac-12  holding off and taking their shot in the next few years appears to be a gamble, but it may work out in their favor anyway. Even though the Pac-12 backed away from secure financial and distribution stability that would surely come with the helping hands of ESPN, the media rights numbers continue to increase every year.

The Pac-12 is still going to make out a pretty rewarding deal, but it will be compared against what the schools in other conferences receive from their various media rights deals. Some within the Pac-12 have grumbled about the payout the Pac-12 Network has yielded thus far, so this is a pretty interesting decision by the conference to not take the ESPN money now and run. This is the same conference that is hoping to get investors to shell out some cash to be a part of the conference as well.

The biggest question may be whether or not Pac-12 commissioner Larry Scott will be around to see the new media rights deal be settled.

Larry Scott said the Pac-12 didn’t have instant replay manual, but it does

Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images
4 Comments

You would think the commissioner of the Pac-12 would know there is a printed copy of the conference’s instant replay procedure after being asked about it two weeks ago. It turns out, Larry Scott may have had no idea such a document existed.

On Saturday, Scott said he looked into the status of an official instant replay manual, only to say there was none in existence.

“I had a chance to look into it … there’s an NCAA rule in writing, but there is no manual,” Scott said. “I’m not aware of any manual that exists in our conference or nationally.”

Unfortunately for him, The Oregonian has obtained a copy of the document titled “The Pac-12 Conference Instant Replay Manual” and shared it for all the world to see.

Oops.

As the Pac-12 continues to battle an image problem regarding the integrity of its officiating and replay system, Scott has tried to calm the nerves around the conference and suggest there is no issue with the integrity of how it manages football games form an officiating standpoint. However, a review of the conference’s unearthed instant replay manual may suggest otherwise.

Per The Oregonian;

A close examination of the 11-page publication could help explain why the conference finds itself embroiled in this instant-replay public-relations nightmare in the first place. The conference replay manual doesn’t include vital components of the instant-replay procedure, is ambiguous and leaves a wide berth for interpretation and instruction that comes from the Pac-12’s centralized command center.

This all comes after Scott and the Pac-12 attempted to explain why a targeting call in a USC-Washington State game was overturned, in which a replay official allegedly claimed to be overruled by a third party. An unwillingness for how the official ruling was made by members of the media has done nothing to suggest the Pac-12’s replay system or officiating is credible.

Now that we know there is an instant replay manual even if the commissioner didn’t, and how lacking the manual is in its details, it may be time for the Pac-12 to take a good hard look in the mirror and start clarifying some details a bit more moving forward.

Pac-12’s Larry Scott says expansion may happen again, but unsure how soon

Photo by Stephen Dunn/Getty Images
3 Comments

Pac-12 commissioner Larry Scott says the expansion fun could kick up some dust in the future, but he is unsure just how soon that may become a realistic possibility.

I think it’s likely you’ll see more expansion, more consolidation over time,” Scott said Wednesday at the Learfield Intercollegiate Athletics Forum in New York, hinting at the possibility of 16 super conferences that have been dreamt up previously. Scott suggested the next round of media rights package negotiations could spearhead those discussions about expansion as conferences look to jockey for the best bargaining power with media partners. The Pac-12’s current contract is due to expire in 2024, to which Scott suggested “We’ll be in a very unique position.”

When the major shifts in conference realignment were at their hottest, the idea of a Pac-16 was a popular idea that would have added Texas and Oklahoma as well as a few other Big 12 members to the Pac-10. Reports of the Pac-16 becoming a reality were premature at the time, however, and the Pac-12 expanded by two with the additions of Utah and Colorado, which led to a rebranding as the Pac-12. The Big Ten added Nebraska at the time and later expanded to 14 with the later additions of Maryland and Rutgers. The SEC had added Missouri and Texas A&M and the Big 12 welcomed TCU and West Virginia. Moves from the power conferences left a ripple effect in the Mountain West Conference, Conference USA, Big East (which led to the American Athletic Conference) and Sun Belt Conference as well as the death of the WAC as a football conference. Things were just about to return to normal until the Big 12 finally made some long-awaited moves to explore their expansion options. The Big 12 closed the door on possible expansion within its conference in recent months, leaving a number of potential Big 12 hopefuls feeling used and disrespected.

Scott also has a bright vision for the future of Pac-12 athletics, which he believes will one day have all Pac-12 sports being broadcast on the Pac-12 Network. That may be true, but the big question will continue to be just how many people will be watching, or be able to watch.