Mannie Netherly

AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis, File

Texas A&M disciplines WR coach for Twitter rant

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You can imagine Texas A&M head coach Kevin Sumlin was a tad bummed in finding out his program was losing the commitment of a four-star wide receiver last week shortly after losing the commitment of a five-star quarterback. He could not have been all too happy with the realization one of his assistant coaches managed to make that happen simply by going off on Twitter.

Texas A&M wide receivers coach Aaron Moorehead went on Twitter following the de-commitment of quarterback Tate Martell, and he did not fire some thinly-veiled shots. Moorehead went off about kids these days and their all-about-me attitudes and the general lack of loyalty. Of course, this stuff happens all the time in football recruiting, and odds are Texas A&M has, on occasion, benefitted from a kid’s lack of loyalty on the recruiting trail. Either way, it was not a good look for Moorehead, nor were his reactions to the reactions. As Moorehead was going off, four-star wide receiver Mannie Netherly saw what was going on and opted out of his commitment as well. Moorehead did later issue an apology on his Twitter account.

On Monday, Sumlin addressed the fuss with his own statement, saying his assistant abused Twitter and it reflected poorly on the entire program. Sumlin confirmed Moorehead has apologized internally within the program and he would face internal discipline.

“Last week, one of our assistant coaches, Aaron Moorehead, abused the privilege of social media and the result reflected poorly on Aaron, on our football program and on Texas A&M. He has apologized publicly and privately for his actions and I am confident that he understands the expectations moving forward. However, there are consequences for actions and Aaron has been disciplined and the details will remain private. We will use this as a learning tool for all of our coaches, staff and student-athletes, and we are now moving forward as a program.”

Moorehead has not posted anything in 140 characters or fewer since his public apology on May 5. Odds are probably pretty good it may be a while before he logs on again as part of his internal discipline.