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Mike MacIntyre fired by Colorado

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At risk of having a second-straight losing season, and the fifth losing season in six years on the job, Colorado will be moving on from head coach Mike MacIntyre. According to a report by Chris Low of ESPN.com, MacIntyre had been informed by the school he would not be returning to coach the Buffs in 2019. Colorado has since confirmed this news.

MacIntyre will not coach Colorado’s final game this weekend against California. An interim coach will be named.

“I want to thank Mike for six seasons of hard work and dedication to the program, both on and off the field,” Colorado athletic director Rick George said in a released statement.  “There’s no doubt that the 2016 season was magical, and it appeared we were headed back to taking our place among the nation’s elite.  However, analyzing the direction of the program over the last two years, I felt this is the necessary time to make a change.”

Colorado owes MacIntyre $10.3 million on his remaining contract through the end of 2021. The buyout would be reduced by the amount of MacIntyre’s new contract if he is hired by another college football program or an NFL team. The buyout will be paid off in monthly payments for the next three years, according to the release from Colorado.

MacIntyre took on the head coaching job at Colorado prior to the 2013 season. After three losing years in Boulder, MacIntyre and Colorado turned in a 10-win season that saw the program play for the Pac-12 championship in 2016. Colorado ascended as high as No. 9 in the AP poll that season before finishing the year at No. 17 for the first AP ranking at the end of a season for the first time since 2002, and the highest end-of-the-year ranking since finishing No. 9 in 2001.

The problem for MacIntyre was an inability to build off a successful 2016 campaign. Colorado went 5-7 last season and come into the final game of the season with a record of 5-6. Colorado needs to win a game at California in order to clinch bowl eligibility, although it may be unexpected MacIntyre would coach the bowl game should Colorado manage to go bowling this season.

This story has been updated from its original posting to reflect Colorado’s confirmation of the news and to provide additional details provided by Colorado.

UPDATE (2:47 p.m. ET): Quarterback coach Kurt Roper will take on the role of interim head coach.

Mike MacIntyre didn’t know Colorado scored a TD when Buffs went for two-point conversion vs. USC

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Colorado lost for the first time late Saturday on the road at USC. The result was not entirely puzzling given Colorado may have been due for a loss and USC can be difficult to top in Los Angeles, but a decision to go for a two-point conversion after a late Colorado touchdown cut into the USC lead left many watching scratching their heads. After the game, Colorado head coach Mike MacIntyre explained the rationale behind the two-point conversion attempt, and it was rather simple.

MacIntyre didn’t know Colorado scored a touchdown and thought it was a first-and-goal situation.

The two-point conversion attempt came following a Steven Montez 19-yard touchdown run with 3:23 to play. The touchdown cut the USC lead to 31-20. A successful two-point conversion would have made it a nine-point game whereas an extra point would have created a 10-point deficit for Colorado. You could argue Colorado still needed two scores in the final minutes anyway and a two-point try would allow for the possibility of a win. The conventional logic, however, suggests there is a better win probability if you only need a touchdown and a field goal. Not that Colorado had a great chance either way to come back and win (which of course, they did not), but the decision to go for two points was a bizarre one. And now we know why.

So, was MacIntyre given incorrect information on the field? Shouldn’t somebody on Colorado have known the team just scored a touchdown, be it an official, a staffer, or one of the players on the field? Who is to blame for this messy situation? The fault should fall on the shoulders of the head coach here. It may not have ultimately altered the outcome of the game, since Colorado did recover the onside kick after all fo this but failed to pick up a first down.

Chad Morris, Derek Dooley among betting favorites to be next Ole Miss head coach

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It did not take long for people to start talking about who the next head coach at Ole Miss will be following the Thursday night resignation of Hugh Freeze. And somehow, one of the betting favorites has quickly become former Tennessee head coach Derek Dooley.

As noted by Rocky Top Talk, the Tennessee blog on SB Nation, the former Vols coach and current assistant with the Dallas Cowboys is listed as the second most-favored coach to take over at Ole Miss, listed at +500 according to BetOnline. SMU head coach Chad Morris is the current betting favorite on the betting website, with Morris listed at +300 to be the next coach of the Rebels.

Other names on the board include former LSU head coach Les Miles (+800), and former Oregon head coach Chip Kelly (+1400). FAU head coach Lane Kiffin has been having fun trolling about the Ole Miss fallout on Twitter, yet he is also on the board at +1600.

For what it is worth, interim head coach Matt Luke has also been given odds to keep the job, and he is listed at +1200.

Here are the latest odds as listed by BetOnline;

  • Chad Morris +300
  • Derek Dooley +500
  • Blake Anderson +700
  • Les Miles +800
  • Mike Norvell +1000
  • Brent Venables +1200
  • Scott Frost +1400
  • Chip Kelly +1400
  • Neal Brown +1600
  • Lane Kiffin +1600
  • Mike MacIntyre +1600
  • Charlie Strong +1600
  • Willie Fritz +2000
  • Bryan Harsin +2000
  • Bobby Petrino +2500

So place your bets wisely. But if you choose to place your money on Dooley, you might as well just send me your money instead.

Colorado extends Mike MacIntyre’s contract through 2021

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After coaching Colorado to a remarkable season to clinch the Pac-12 South Division championship, Colorado is provide a little extra job security to head coach Mike MacIntyre. Colorado announced it has offered a contract extension of three years through 2021. The contract extension must be approved by the board of regents, but that is merely a formality.

“I am ecstatic that we will be at University of Colorado for the foreseeable future, there’s no place my family and I would rather be,” MacIntyre said in a released statement. “We absolutely love it here, the people have been great and I truly believe this is just the beginning.”

MacIntyre is coming off his fourth season in Boulder. After working through three losing seasons with a cumulative record of 10-27, MacIntyre coached Colorado to a 10-4 season in 2016 highlighted by a division championship. It was Colorado’s first division crown since joining the Pac-12 in 2011. At Colorado, MacIntyre is just 20-31 but appears to have something positive working at the program that has waited a long time to enjoy success on the field on a regular basis.

Before arriving at Colorado, MacIntyre coached three seasons at San Jose State, showing improvement from year-to-year and culminating in a 10-win season and a top 25 finish in the AP poll with the Spartans in 2012.

It must be coaching contract extension day in the state of Colorado, because Air Force also gave a contract extension through 2021 to head coach Troy Calhoun today.

Saban, Harbaugh, Meyer among Maxwell Football Club coach of the year semifinalists

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Alabama head coach Nick Saban, Michigan head coach Jim Harbaugh and Ohio State head coach Urban Meyer are among 16 remaining candidates for the George Munger Collegiate Coach of the Year Award presented by the Maxwell Football Club.

Saban is the only coach from the SEC listed as a semifinalist, and he has never won the award that was first presented in 1989 to Michigan’s Bo Schembechler. Gene Stallings is the only Alabama coach to win the award, doing so in 1992. Mississippi State’s Dan Mullen was the first SEC coach since 1998 (Tennessee’s Philip Fulmer) to win the award, in 2014.

Meyer and Mike Leach are the only semifinalists to previously win the award. Meyer won the award in 2004 at Utah and Leach took the award in 2008 with Texas Tech. Penn State’s James Franklin could become the third Penn State coach to win the award, joining Joe Paterno (1990, 2005) and Bill O’Brien (2012).

The remaining semifinalists for the award are Mike MacIntyre (Colorado), Bobby Petrino (Louisville), Neal Brown (Troy), Ken Niumatalolo (Navy), Scott Frost (UCF), Kyle Whittingham (Utah), Justin Fuente (Virginia Tech), Chris Petersen (Washington), Dana Holgorsen (West Virginia), P.J. Fleck (Western Michigan) and Paul Chryst (Wisconsin).

Finalists for the award will be announced on December 12 and a winner will be named on December 29. The winner will be presented with the award on March 10, 2017 in Atlantic City, New Jersey at the annual Maxwell Football Club Awards Banquet.