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App State’s leading receiver a year ago remains suspended

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Appalachian State was missing its leading receiver from a year ago for the opener. With Week 2 on the horizon, things won’t change this Saturday on that front.

In mid-May, Corey Sutton was arrested for possession of marijuana following a traffic stop.  In late August, first-year head coach Eli Drinkwitz announced that the star wide receiver would be suspended for the Sun Belt Conference school’s season opener against FCS Eastern Tennessee State. The only reason given was unspecified violations of team rules.

This week, Drinkwitz confirmed that Sutton will remain suspended and miss this Saturday’s game against Charlotte as well.

“It’s not new,” the coach told the Winston-Salem Journal when asked if the suspension was for a different issue. “How we’re going to operate is just a one-week-at-a-time-announcement scenario. This was just a continuation of what happened.”

Drinkwitz, whose team will be on a bye next weekend, declined to say whether Sutton would be available for the Week 4 game against North Carolina.

During his first on-field season at ASU in 2018, Sutton led the Mountaineers in receptions (44), receiving yards (773), receiving touchdowns (10) and yards per catch (17.6). The touchdowns also led the Sun Belt Conference and were tied for 21st nationally.

Sutton, whose rancorous exit from Kansas State included then-head coach Bill Snyder‘s inexplicable decision to publicly reveal a pair of failed drug tests on the receiver’s part, sat out the 2017 season to satisfy NCAA transfer rules.

First-year head coaches (barely) finished above .500 in 2019 debuts

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For those FBS schools that made changes at the top of its program last year and on into early 2019, the results, at least for the opening weekends of the college football season, were decidedly mixed.

Entering Weeks 0/1, a total of 26 head coaches were in their first games (two coaching a second first game) with their respective schools. Of those 26, 15 won their opening matchups while *uses fingers to do the math, takes off shoes when fingers run out* 11 dropped their openers.

Seven of the head coaches new to their current schools — Akron (Illinois), East Carolina (NC State), Houston (Oklahoma), Liberty (Syracuse), Texas State (Texas A&M), UMass (Rutgers) and Utah State (Wake Forest) — led off with Power Five opponents; not surprisingly, all seven of those ended up exiting Week 1 with a loss.  Exactly half of the 26 kicked off against FCS schools, and just one, Western Kentucky to Central Arkansas, failed to come away with a win.

At the other end was Louisville and North Carolina leading off with matchups against Power Five foes, Notre Dame for the former and South Carolina the latter.  The Cardinals extended their nation’s-worst losing streak to 10 in a row while the Tar Heels got past the Gamecocks in Mack Brown‘s return to Chapel Hill.

Oh, and there was Hugh Freeze‘s official return to coaching from a hospital bed up in the coaches’ box in Liberty’s loss to Syracuse.

WIN (15)
Eliah Drinkwitz, Appalachian State (beat East Tennessee State, 42-7)
Scot Loeffler, Bowling Green (Morgan State, 46-3)
Jim McElwain, Central Michigan (Albany, 38-21)
Brad Lambert, Charlotte (Gardner-Webb, 49-28)
Mel Tucker, Colorado (Colorado State, 52-31)
Les Miles, Kansas (Indiana State, 24-17)
Chris Klieman, Kansas State (Nicholls, 49-14)
Mike Locksley, Maryland (Howard, 79-0)
Mack Brown, North Carolina (South Carolina, 24-20)
Thomas Hammock, Northern Illinois (Illinois State, 24-10)
Ryan Day, Ohio State (FAU, 45-21)
Rod Carey, Temple (Bucknell, 56-12)
Chip Lindsey, Troy (Campbell, 43-14)
Matt Wells, Texas Tech (Montana State, 45-10)
Neal Brown, West Virginia (James Madison, 20-13)

LOSS (11)
Tom Arth, Akron (lost to Illinois, 42-3)
Mike Houston, East Carolina (NC State, 34-6)
Geoff Collins, Georgia Tech (Clemson, 52-14)
Dana Holgorsen, Houston (Oklahoma, 49-31)
Hugh Freeze, Liberty (Syracuse, 24-0)
Scott Satterfield, Louisville (Notre Dame, 35-17)
Manny Diaz, Miami (Florida, 24-20)
Jake Spavital, Texas State (Texas A&M, 41-7)
Walt Bell, UMass (Rutgers 48-21)
Gary Andersen, Utah State (Wake Forest, 38-35)
Tyson Helton, Western Kentucky (Central Arkansas, 35-28)

Clemson still claims FBS-best winning streak at 16 straight, but who’s next at 10 in a row?

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The defending national champions continued its college football dominance in Week 1, while a fellow ACC school wrested the “top” spot for losing ways away from a Big Ten program.

With a woodshedding of Georgia Tech in the opener last Thursday night, Clemson extended its nation’s-best winning streak to 16 in a row. Clemson’s last loss? Against Alabama in one of the 2017 College Football Playoff semifinals, a loss it avenged in the 2018 title tilt.

Just one other school has a current double-digit winning streak, and it likely who you wouldn’t immediately be thinking of as Army has won 10 in a row in a stretch that began the week after the service academy’s seven-point overtime loss to then-No. 5 Oklahoma Sept. 22 of last year. Extending that streak to 11 straight won’t be easy to say the least as Army travels to the Big House Saturday to face No. 7 Michigan.

Ohio State and Appalachian State will take seven-game winning streaks into next weekend’s action, while four schools (Florida, Stanford, Texas A&M, Wyoming) have won five in a row and another four (Iowa, Kentucky, Ohio, TCU) have claimed four straight.

At the opposite end of the streaking spectrum is Louisville, which is the only program with a double-digit losing streak at 10. The UofL had the ignominious honor of unseating Rutgers, which had dropped 11 in a row prior to a win over UMass. It’s worth noting that RU still hasn’t beaten a Power Five schools since dropping Maryland in early November of 2017.

USF (seven); Akron and Colorado State (six); Coastal Carolina and Oregon State (five); and Kent State, Pitt and Texas State (four) are all in the midst of extended losing streaks as well.

In addition to Rutgers, UConn (nine in a row); Colorado, Georgia State — AGAINST TENNESSEE — and New Mexico (seven); and UTSA (six) all snapped lengthy losing streaks in Week 1.

One final note: A total of 65 of the 130 FBS teams have either won one game “in a row” (50) or will carry a one-game losing “streak” (15) into Week 2.

After offseason pot arrest, App State suspends top receiver for opener

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An off-field situation earlier this offseason will bleed onto the field for Appalachian State, at least initially.

In mid-May, Corey Sutton was arrested for possession of marijuana following a traffic stop. Three months later, first-year head coach Eli Drinkwitz has announced that the star wide receiver will be suspended for the Sun Belt Conference school’s season opener next Saturday. The only reason given was unspecified violations of team rules.

The suspension means Sutton will be ineligible to take the field against FCS East Tennessee State at Kidd Brewer Stadium. He would then be eligible to return for the following weekend’s game against Charlotte.

During his first on-field season at ASU in 2018, Sutton led the Mountaineers in receptions (44), receiving yards (773), receiving touchdowns (10) and yards per catch (17.6). The touchdowns also led the Sun Belt Conference and were tied for 21st nationally.

Sutton, whose rancorous exit from Kansas State included then-head coach Bill Snyder‘s inexplicable decision to publicly reveal a pair of failed drug tests on the receiver’s part, sat out the 2017 season to satisfy NCAA transfer rules.

Johnny Unitas Golden Arm Award watch list includes 2018 finalist Shea Patterson, Jalen Hurts, Justin Herbert

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And now for a quarterback award watch list that won’t include a certain starting quarterback form Clemson or Alabama. The Johnny Unitas Foundation has released the watch list for the Johnny Unitas Golden Arm Award, presented annually to college football’s top senior or fourth-year quarterback. This year’s watch list includes some recognizable names such as Oklahoma’s Jalen Hurts and Oregon’s Justin Herbert.

Former Washington State quarterback Gardner Minshew was named the winner of the award in 2018. Just one finalist for the 2018 award is on the watch list this season. Michigan’s Shea Patterson is that player (UCF’s McKenzie Milton was a finalist last year but is not expected to play this season despite still being at UCF as he recovers from his season-ending injury from late in 2018).

Other past winners include Deshaun Watson (2016), Marcus Mariota (2014), Andrew Luck (2011), Matt Ryan (2007), Eli Manning (2003), Carson Palmer (2002) and Peyton Manning (1997).

2019 Golden Arm Award Watch List Presented by A. O. Smith

  • Jack Abraham, Southern Mississippi
  • Blake Barnett, University of South Florida
  • Woody Barrett, Kent State
  • Jake Bentley, University of South Carolina
  • Anthony Brown, Boston College
  • Kelly Bryant, Missouri
  • Joe Burrow, LSU
  • Stephen Buckshot Calvert, Liberty
  • Marcus Childers, Northern Illinois
  • K.J. Costello, Stanford Unversity
  • Jacob Eason, Washington University
  • Caleb Evans, University of Louisiana Monroe
  • Mason Fine, North Texas
  • Feleipe Franks, University of Florida
  • Mitchell Guadagni, Toledo
  • Jarrett Guarantano, University of Tennessee
  • Gage Gubrud, Washington State University
  • Quentin Harris, Duke University
  • Justin Herbert, University of Oregon
  • Kelvin Hopkins, Jr., Army
  • Tyler Huntley, University of Utah
  • Jalen Hurts, University of Oklahoma
  • Josh Jackson, University of Maryland
  • D’Eriq King, Houston
  • Brian Lewerke, Michigan State University
  • Jordan Love, Utah State University
  • Jake Luton, Oregon State University
  • Cole McDonald, University of Hawaii
  • Justin McMillan, Tulane
  • Steven Montez, University of Colorado
  • James Morgan, FIU
  • Riley Neal, Vanderbilt University
  • Kato Nelson, Akron
  • Shea Patterson, University of Michigan
  • Bryce Perkins, University of Virginia
  • Malcolm Perry, Navy
  • Peyton Ramsey, Indiana University
  • Armani Rogers, UNLV
  • Nathan Rourke, Ohio
  • Anthony Russo, Temple University
  • J’Mar Smith, Louisiana Tech
  • Nate Stanley, University of Iowa
  • Dillon Sterling-Cole, Arizona State University
  • Khalil Tate, University of Arizona
  • Zac Thomas, Appalachian State University
  • Skylar Thompson, Kansas State
  • Brady White, University of Memphis
  • Ryan Willis, Virginia Tech
  • Brandon Wimbush, University of Central Florida