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Arizona State punter who declared for draft, signed with agent, went undrafted… granted waiver by NCAA to return to Sun Devils

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Thanks to Arizona State football, we have something never seen before.  Ever (we think).

Back in January, Michael Turk gave up two years of eligibility with Arizona State football to enter the 2020 NFL Draft early.  The punter signed with an agent.  Then promptly went undrafted.

After Turk went undrafted, though, ASU went to the NCAA to seek a waiver that would allow Turk to return to the Sun Devils.  The school’s reasoning?  The coronavirus pandemic cost Turk the opportunity to work out for NFL teams, thus causing his draft stock to plummet.  Not only couldn’t Turk work out privately for NFL teams, but ASU’s Pro Day was canceled because of the pandemic as well.

That tack worked for Turk as it’s now being reported that a special waiver has been granted by the NCAA.  One that should be granted to every player who leaves early and goes undrafted, incidentally.  But that’s another story for another day.

Turk came to Arizona State as a transfer from the junior college ranks as part of its 2018 recruiting class. Turk’s uncle is Matt Turk, the former NFL punter who spent one year of his professional career with a New York Jets team coached by current ASU head coach Herm Edwards.

As a redshirt sophomore this season, Turk was tied for 11th nationally and led the Pac-12 in averaging 46 yards per punt.  For that, he earned first-team all-conference honors.  He was also named as a handful of semifinalists for the 2019 Ray Guy Award.

Turk, though, won’t be handed his old job back without some competition. Last month, Florida State punter Logan Tyler transferred into the Arizona State football program.

As had been the case the previous three years, Tyler served as FSU’s starting punter in the 2019 opener against Boise State.  However, Tyler was involved in an automobile accident back in August and was under investigation by the Tallahassee Police Department for driving under the influence.  Tyler served a two-game suspension in Weeks 2 and 3 in connection to that off-field situation.

While Tyler dressed out for the two games after his suspension ended, walk-on Tommy Martin continued serving as the Seminoles’ primary punter.

Including the one game this season, Tyler has averaged 42.5 yards on his 209 punts during his career, with the average currently fourth in school history. His 82 punts and 3,545 yards in 2018 set a school record.  The Tallahassee Democrat noted that “Tyler currently holds FSU records for the most punt yards in a single game (499 vs. Clemson, 2018)… and punt yards in a single season (3,545).” His 8,879 career punt yards are also second all-time in school history.

Louisiana lands Arizona State transfer OT Zach Robertson

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There is another transfer loss for Arizona State, and this one will benefit the Louisiana football program.

We noted earlier today that tight end Jared Bubak had decided to transfer to Nebraska.  Sunday afternoon, former teammate Zach Robertson announced on Twitter that he has committed to the Louisiana football program.

Robertson also confirmed that he has been granted a sixth season of eligibility by the NCAA.  The offensive tackle will be coming to the Ragin’ Cajuns as a graduate transfer as well.

“First and foremost I’d like to give all glory and honor to God for blessing me with this opportunity.  I’ve been given the chance to play the game I love again,” the lineman wrote. “I want to thank the coaches at ULL and ASU for being genuine people that wanted to help me and my family during the process. …

I am extremely excited and ready to put a uniform back on, and make my family, and the people that have stood by me through the tough times proud.”

When Robertson gets to Lafayette, he’ll find a familiar face.

Billy Napier is the head coach for Louisiana football.  Prior to assuming that post in December of 2017, he spent one season as the offensive coordinator at Arizona State.

Robertson was a four-star 2015 signee for the Sun Devils.  Only three members of ASU’s class that year were rated higher than the Bellflower, Calif. product.

During his time in Tempe, Robertson appeared in 31 games.  He started four games (three at right tackle, one at left), with all of those coming in 2017.  The starter at left tackle heading into 2019, Robertson appeared in just one game because of unspecified personal issues.

Arizona State TE transfer Jared Bubak is headed home to Nebraska

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After a series of losses this offseason, Nebraska is on the positive side of a football roster move.  And it involves a local boy for good measure.

Jared Bubak began exploring the possibility of leaving Arizona State earlier this offseason.  Over the weekend, the tight end revealed on Twitter that he will be transferring into the Nebraska football team.  Interestingly, he’ll be joining the Cornhuskers as a walk-on.

Because of that, and the fact that he is an ASU graduate, he’ll be eligible to play for the Big Ten school this coming season.

Bubak is a native of Lincoln, Neb.  He actually committed to Nebraska before flipping to Arizona State football.

“After speaking with the coaching staff, I have decided to finish my last year of eligibility with the University of Nebraska as a walk-on,” Bubak wrote. “This transfer portal process has solidified how important the state of Nebraska is to me and my family.  The chance to come back home and play for Coach [Scott] Frost was an easy decision for me and I’m excited to represent the people of Nebraska.

“I just didn’t want to be living with that what-if,” said Bubak in explaining his decision to the Lincoln Journal Star. “What if I had gone to Nebraska? So I always knew for my last year I wanted to come back home and see what happens.

Bubak was a three-star 2016 signee for the Sun Devils.  He was the No. 2 player in the state of Nebraska regardless of position.

The 6-5, 242-pound Bubak appeared in 17 games during his time at ASU.  Seven of those appearances came a season ago.  He didn’t catch a pass during his time in Tempe, although he did return one kick.  For minus-four yards.

At least 13 scholarship Cornhuskers who have left the program for one reason or another this offseason.  Included in those are:

Additionally, three walk-on offensive linemen have left as well.

College Football Hall of Fame damaged amidst protests in Atlanta overnight

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In the wake of the murder of George Floyd, protests have erupted across the country.  Overnight, those protests hit the home for college football history.

A peaceful protest in Atlanta Friday turned violent later in the night as many numerous businesses in the city were vandalized and looted.  According to myriad media outlets, one of those that suffered damage was the College Football Hall of Fame.

Fortunately, one of the reports stated, “none of the artifacts or history memorabilia was damaged… just the glass in front of the store.” One report, though, described the hall as being “destroyed.”

“First and foremost, our hearts go out to the friends and family of George Floyd,” College Football Hall of Fame CEO Kimberly Beaudin said in a statement. “We support the peaceful protests that honor his memory but unfortunately they deteriorated into chaos and disorder. We are heartbroken to see the damage to our city and the Hall of Fame. As our Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms said, we are better than this, better than this as a city, and better than this as a country.

“In the coming days and weeks, we’ll work to pick up the pieces, to build back the sacred walls that housed memories and honored those who played the game many of whom fought these same injustices throughout their storied careers.”

NCAA extends recruiting dead period through July 31; The Association will also allow strength coaches to ‘virtually observe voluntary physical workouts’

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Not surprisingly, the NCAA has reset its recruiting trail policies.  Again.

As the coronavirus pandemic effectively shuttered the sports world, the NCAA announced in mid-March that it was putting a halt to all in-person recruiting until at least April 15.  Last month, that dead period was extended through May 31.  This month, another extension took us to June 30.

As we close in on the month of June, another extension is official.  As expected, the NCAA announced Wednesday evening that the recruiting dead period has been extended through July 31.  That means all in-person recruiting activities — either on-campus or elsewhere — are prohibited.

The latest edict impacts all sports, not just football.

“The extension maintains consistent recruiting rules for all sports and allows coaches to focus on the student-athletes who may be returning to campus,” said Division I Council Coordination Committee chair M. Grace Calhoun, athletics director at Pennsylvania, said in a statement. “The committee is committed to reviewing the dead period again in late June or early July.”

One potential effect of all of these dead-period extension bans?  It could force The Association to, for one year, temporarily get rid of the December Early Signing Period.

The NCAA earlier this month also announced that football programs could begin bringing players back to campus for voluntary workouts starting June 1.  In the dead-period release, The Association also updated its tack on that front:

Additionally, the committee decided to allow strength and conditioning coaches to virtually observe voluntary physical workouts for health and safety purposes but only if requested by the student-athlete. The measure goes into effect June 1. The strength and conditioning coach will be allowed to observe the workouts and discuss items related to voluntary workouts but not direct or conduct the workout.

The decision was supported by the Committee on Safeguards and Medical Aspects of Sports Prevention and Performance Subcommittee. The subcommittee encouraged schools that decide to allow their strength and conditioning coaches to observe voluntary workouts to proactively consider the school’s overarching responsibility to protect the health of and provide a safe environment for each student-athlete. More specifically, the subcommittee stressed that schools should plan for how the strength and conditioning coach should respond if they observe an unsafe workout environment or in the event that a medical emergency occurs during a voluntary session.

The committee will continue to explore the opportunity for strength and conditioning coaches to conduct voluntary workouts virtually, as they do during in-person, on-campus voluntary workouts.