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Bill proposed in New York aims to share college athletics revenue directly with student-athletes

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As the state of California moves forward with a push adopt a law that would allow student-athletes to receive compensation for the use of their name and likeness, a new bill proposed in New York aims to go one step farther. Senator Kevin Parker has proposed a bill that would allow student-athletes to be compensated directly from the school’s annual revenue.

As written, Senate Bill S6722A in New York seeks to allow student-athletes (including college football players) to be able to receive compensation for the use of their name, likeness or image; the ability to hire an agent; and to receive an even distribution directly from the school from the university’s athletics revenue. The bill intends to require schools to set aside 15 percent of revenue earned from ticket sales and distribute that evenly among every student-athlete at the school.

This could impact three FBS schools in New York; Syracuse, Buffalo, and Army. New York also has a handful of FCS programs as well, including Fordham, Stony Brook, and Colgate. If the bill gains any traction, it would impact each school differently due to the range in ticket revenue generated by each school. The proposed bill currently sits in committee right now and has not been scheduled for a date on the Senate floor in New York.

The NCAA will frown upon this bill, just as it has in California, and it would be expected schools in New York would not be in favor of such a bill. The NCAA has already threatened the state of California with potentially removing all championship events organized by the NCAA from the state. A similar threat to New York would be the typical response if needed. That may not impact the college football world much, although it could mean no NCAA basketball tournament games being played in New York, a state that has routinely hosted NCAA basketball tournament games across the state. The Pinstripe Bowl should be safe because it is not run by the NCAA (although the NCAA could refuse to certify the Pinstripe Bowl if it really wanted). But we are far from the point to have that discussion.

The Fair Pay for Play bill in California, which is currently waiting to be signed into law or vetoed by the state’s governor, merely allows student-athletes to seek representation and receive compensation for the use of their name, likeness, or image. This trend is certainly picking up steam, and it would not be a surprise to see other states attempt to challenge the NCAA’s model of amateurism.

Dabo Swinney turns Georgia Tech’s loss to The Citadel into swipe at Alabama, South Carolina, SEC

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The Citadel beat Georgia Tech on Saturday. It’s not great for the ACC, and particularly not great if you’re a College Football Playoff contender with the Yellow Jackets on your schedule, as Clemson is.

Clemson head coach Dabo Swinney was asked about that game on Tuesday, and he deftly pivoted from a black mark on the ACC’s resume into a swipe at the entire SEC.

“That’s college football,” Swinney told 247Sports. “I mean heck, The Citadel was probably Alabama’s toughest game last year until Georgia. I mean I’m just telling the truth. The Citadel beat South Carolina somewhere here in the not-too-long-ago (past). That’s not a shocker. Georgia State went over and beat Tennessee. I mean that’s college football. Anything can happen, especially early, especially early in the season. Because nobody knows anything about anybody at this point.”

The Citadel played Alabama to a 10-10 halftime score last November… before the Tide pulled away for a 50-17 win, and the military academy did beat South Carolina in 2015.

But it wasn’t Alabama’s closest pre-Georgia game, but arguing facts when you’re in a troll-esque argument proves you’ve already lost, doesn’t it?

Jalen Hurts, Joe Burrow surge past Trevor Lawrence in Heisman odds

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When the 2019 campaign kicked off, most assumed that the 2019 Heisman Trophy would be a two-player race. Three weeks in and that number has more than doubled.

In odds released by one offshore sportsbook, Alabama quarterback Tua Tagovailoa is listed as a 2/1 favorite to win this year’s Heisman. The other preseason co-favorite, Clemson quarterback Trevor Lawrence, whose odds now sit at 15/2 — they were at 3/1 a week ago — after a start to the season has seen him throw more interceptions in three games (five) than he had in 15 games (four) as a true freshman a year ago.

Lawrence was actually leapfrogged in this latest odds release by a pair of quarterbacks: Oklahoma’s Jalen Hurts, who went from 7/2 to 3/1, and LSU’s Joe Burrow, up to 4/1 from 18/1.

Another quarterback also made an upward move as Ohio State’s Justin Fields climbed from 16/1 to 10/1.

The only non-quarterbacks on the list?  Wisconsin running back Jonathan Taylor sits at 20/1, while fellow running backs Travis Etienne of Clemson and D’Andre Swift of Georgia, along with Alabama wide receiver Jerry Jeudy,  are sitting at 33/1.  Another running back, Ohio State’s J.K. Dobbins, is listed at 100/1.

Other quarterbacks that were listed include Georgia’s Jake Fromm at 14/1 (12/1 a week ago), Oregon’s Justin Herbert at 18/1 (25/1), Texas’ Sam Ehlinger at 18/1 (16/1), Notre Dame’s Ian Book at 50/1 (50/1), Michigan’s Shea Patterson at 66/1 (22/1) and Nebraska’s Adrian Martinez at 100/1 (off the board).

Four-year-old opens lemonade stand to help buy out Willie Taggart’s contract

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As a head football coach, you know you’re in trouble when you lose the preschoolers bloc.

Willie Taggart was officially hired as Florida State’s coach Dec. 5, 2017; on Sept. 16, 2018, we ran a post noting that FSU fans had started a GoFundMe page seeking a buyout of Taggart’s contract just three games into his first season in Tallahassee as the Seminoles started the year at 1-2. That season ended with FSU’s bowl streak snapped at 36 straight; this season began with yet another 1-2 record, including second-half defensive collapses that have left the ‘Noles with that same 1-2 mark in back-to-back-to-back seasons (now-Texas A&M coach Jimbo Fisher authored the first) for the first time since 1974-76.

The drumbeat surrounding Taggart has grown louder entering Week 4, with one four-year-old young man, whose father is an FSU booster, setting up a lemonade stand in Tallahassee in which the proceeds from his sales are earmarked toward buying out the coach’s contract.

From the Tallahassee Democrat:

That’s what 4-year-old Grayton Grant did early Sunday, setting up a “Free Willie” lemonade stand outside of his grandmother’s Tallahassee home and raising $241 in just under three hours.

Grayton charged $20 per cup, with one customer donating $100, before running out of lemonade in the sunny, 90-degree weather.

Grayton’s father – FSU graduate and booster Daniel Grant – teamed up with his son. He matched the total and stroked a check for $482 to Seminole Boosters, Inc.

The check – earmarked for “Taggart Buy Out!” – was accompanied by a formal yet tongue-in-cheek, typewritten letter signed by Grayton to Seminole Boosters, Inc.

For those wondering: Taggart’s buyout is in the neighborhood of $17 million if he’s fired without cause before February 1, 2020.  For those keeping score at home, and at $20 a pop, young Mr. Grant would have to sell 850,000 cups of lemonade to cover the entire cost of Taggart’s buyout on his own.

So, get to work young man.  You (and by “you” I mean your dad) have a long ways to go.

‘Academic requirements’ trigger redshirt for 4-star 2019 Miami signee

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One very heralded member of Miami’s most recent recruiting class has yet to see the field in 2019, and, thanks to academic issues, you won’t see him at all this season.

After picking up his first win as The U’s head football coach this past Saturday, Manny Diaz revealed that linebacker Avery Huff and defensive lineman Cameron Williams will be utilizing their redshirt years this season. Per Diaz, the two defenders will be sidelined because of what he described as “academic requirements.”

The two players will still be permitted to practice with the team

“Cam and Avery are both not going to be able to play this year due to academic requirements,” the coach said according to the Miami Herald, “so this will be their redshirt year and they’ll be good to go next year.”

A couple of years ago, the NCAA instituted an academic redshirt for those student-athletes who do “NOT meet all of the initial-eligibility standards… for competition.” As relayed by 247Sports.com:

If a college-bound student-athlete does NOT meet all of the initial-eligibility standards (core-course progression requirement, minimum 2.3 core-course grade point average (GPA)) for competition, a separate certification is completed using the 16 core courses with the best grades in the student’s academic record (no core-course progression requirement) to calculate the core-course GPA for academic redshirt purposes. This core-course GPA is paired with the student’s SAT or ACT score and assessed against the academic redshirt sliding scale (minimum 2.0 core-course GPA).

Huff was a four-star 2019 signee, rated as the No. 12 outside linebacker in the country. Only three other signees in the Hurricanes’ 18-player class were rated higher than the Fort Lauderdale high schooler.

Williams, meanwhile, was a three-star signee.