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Big 12 to allow teams to play 1 non-conference football game

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Two people involved with the decision say the Big 12 will permit its teams to play one nonconference football game this year to go along with their nine league contests as plans for the pandemic-altered season continued to fall into place.

The people spoke Monday night to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because the conference was still preparing an official announcement.

The Big 12 university presidents signed off on the conference’s scheduling model, which gives schools the ability to play one nonconference game at home. The conference’s championship game is scheduled for Dec. 5, but one of the people told AP that the conference is leaving open the possibility of bumping it back a week or two.

The 10-team Big 12 already plays a nine-game, round-robin conference schedule. Unlike other Power Five conference that have switched to either exclusively (Big Ten, Pac-12 and SEC) or mostly (ACC) league games this season, the Big 12 could not add more conference games without teams playing each other more than once.

Several Big 12 teams have already started preseason practice, with Kansas and Oklahoma slated to play FCS teams on Aug. 29.

As conferences take steps toward a football season that seems to be in precarious shape, the NCAA is expected to weigh in Tuesday on fall sports other than major-college football.

The association’s Board of Governors is scheduled to meet and whether to cancel or postpone NCAA championship events in fall sports such as soccer, volleyball and lower-division football is expected to be a topic.

Only the Pac-12 has a full football schedule with matchups and dates in place among Power Five conferences. The Pac-12 will begin Sept. 26, along with the Southeastern Conference, which is still working on its new 10-game slate.

The Atlantic Coast Conference has opponents set for its 10-game conference schedule and will start the weekend of Sept. 12, but no specific game dates. The ACC has also said it will permit its teams to play one nonconference game.

The Big Ten, first to announce intentions to go conference-only this season, has yet to release a new schedule, but that could come later this week.

Now that the Power Five has declared its intentions the Group of Five conferences can start making plans and filling holes on their schedules.

American Athletic Conference Commissioner Mike Aresco has said the AAC could stick with its eight-game conference schedule and let its members plays as many of their four nonconference games as they can salvage or replace.

The Mountain West, Conference USA, Mid-American and Sun Belt conferences are likely to take similar approach.

Early Monday, Texas State from the Sun Belt announced it was moving a nonconference game against SMU up from Sept. 5 to Aug. 29.

College Football amidst Coronavirus Pandemic: On this day in CFT history, including the family of Joe Paterno filing an appeal of the NCAA’s sanctions of Penn State

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The sports world, including college football, had essentially screeched to a halt in the spring as countries around the world battled the coronavirus pandemic. As such, there was a dearth of college football news as the sport went into a COVID-induced hibernation.  Slowly, though, the game is coming back to life.  Hopefully.

That being said, we thought it might be fun to go back through the CollegeFootballTalk archives that stretch back to 2009 and take a peek at what transpired in the sport on this date.

So, without further ado — ok, one further ado — here’s what happened in college football on August 3, by way of our team of CFT writers both past and present.

(P.S.: If any of our readers have ideas on posts they’d like to read during this college football down-time, leave your suggestions in the comments section.  Mailbag, maybe?)

2019

THE HEADLINE: Les Miles adds second transferring son to Kansas football roster
THE SYNOPSIS: It was a veritable All in the Mad Hatter Family reunion in Lawrence. In November of 2018, Miles was officially introduced as Kansas’ next head football coach.  Early on in the 2019 offseason, quarterback Manny Miles transferred in from North Carolina.  Then former Nebraska and Texas A&M fullback Ben Miles followed his dad and brother to KU.  Ben Miles ran for one yard on three carries and caught a pass for two yards in his first season with the Jayhawks.  In three games, Manny Miles completed 9-of-17 passes (52.9%) for 114 yards, one touchdown and two interceptions.

2019

THE HEADLINE: Ex-Wisconsin WR Quintez Cephus acquitted of sex assault charges
THE SYNOPSIS: This was the end of a very trying year and a half off the field for the standout wide receiver.  Cephus, incidentally, returned to the Badgers for the 2019 season.  He then left UW early for the 2020 NFL Draft.

2018

THE HEADLINE: Urban Meyer tweets statement, says he has always followed proper procedures
THE SYNOPSIS: This came shortly after the Ohio State coach was placed on on paid administrative leave amidst the Zach Smith imbroglio.  Eventually, Meyer would be suspended for three games.  And then retired.

2017

THE HEADLINE: Nick Saban not suspending Alabama DL Da’Shawn Hand after DUI
THE SYNOPSIS: It just means more.  More leniency, apparently.

2016

THE HEADLINE: Report: Maurice Smith ostracized, found ‘personal belongings in the trash’ after decision to transfer from ‘Bama
THE SYNOPSIS: After initial blocking him, Alabama ultimately relented and allowed the defensive backs to transfer to Georgia.

2012

THE HEADLINE: Paterno family files appeal against NCAA for PSU sanctions
THE SYNOPSIS: The family of three late Joe Paterno subsequently filed a counter to the Freeh report that led to historic sanctions a on the Penn State football program. And then sued the NCAA in May of 2013.  Before dropping the suit four years later.  Three years after that, the Penn State Board of Trustees announced the university and the Paterno family have reached a resolution on their ongoing issues.

2010

THE HEADLINE: After shaky media days appearance, Paterno Watch resumes in earnest
THE SYNOPSIS: With a tainted legacy in tow, Joe Paterno retired 16 months later.  Two months later, the disgraced Penn State legend died at the age of 85.

Texas Tech defensive lineman who declared for the 2020 NFL Draft in January has reportedly transferred to an FCS school

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The odd journey one erstwhile Texas Tech football player has taken this offseason has seen another twist.

On Twitter in January, Houston Miller announced on that he would be foregoing his remaining eligibility with the Texas Tech football team and making himself available for the 2020 NFL Draft.  It was already shown this offseason that a player can declare for the draft, sign with an agent and go undrafted and still return to college football with his eligibility intact.

I don’t know that’s necessarily the case with Miller.  What I do know is that 247Sports.com is reporting that Miller has transferred from Tech to Southeastern Louisiana. The defensive lineman, as you have probably guessed, was not selected in the draft this past April.

Just how he went from declaring for the draft to another year of college ball is unclear.  At this point, Miller has not commented on the development on his personal Twitter account.

At Southeastern Louisiana, Miller will be eligible to play immediately in 2020.  The upcoming season would serve as his final year of eligibility, unless he were to pursue a sixth season from the NCAA.

Miller was a three-star member of the Texas Tech football Class of 2016.  The lineman played his high school football in Keller, Texas.

As a true freshman, Keller took a redshirt.  An injury sidelined Keller after four games of the 2017 season.  The past two years, the lineman appeared in all 24 games.  Most of that action, though, came on special teams.

College Football amidst Coronavirus Pandemic: On this day in CFT history, including Notre Dame coaching legend Ara Parseghian dies at 94

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The sports world, including college football, had essentially screeched to a halt in the spring as countries around the world battled the coronavirus pandemic. As such, there was a dearth of college football news as the sport went into a COVID-induced hibernation.  Slowly, though, the game is coming back to life.  Hopefully.

That being said, we thought it might be fun to go back through the CollegeFootballTalk archives that stretch back to 2009 and take a peek at what transpired in the sport on this date.

So, without further ado — ok, one further ado — here’s what happened in college football on August 2, by way of our team of CFT writers both past and present.

(P.S.: If any of our readers have ideas on posts they’d like to read during this college football down-time, leave your suggestions in the comments section.  Mailbag, maybe?)

2019

THE HEADLINE: Iowa strength coach Chris Doyle remains highest-paid in the country with pay bump to $800K
THE SYNOPSIS: Less than a year later, amidst controversy, Doyle and the Hawkeyes “parted ways.”

2018

THE HEADLINE: Four-star Nebraska signee Maurice Washington cleared academically
THE SYNOPSIS: If only this was the end of his off-field journey.  Yeah, not even close.

2017

THE HEADLINE: Notre Dame mourns the passing of Ara Parseghian
THE SYNOPSIS: In 11 seasons with Parseghian as head coach, the Fighting Irish went 95-17-4 and won two national championships, 1966 and 1973.  The College Football Hall of Famer was 94 at the time of his passing.

2016

THE HEADLINE: Ohio State sits atop AP’s Top 100 poll of all-time college football programs
THE SYNOPSIS: The Associated Press put together a list that was based on total poll appearances, number of times ranked No. 1 and bonuses for AP national championships.  The Top Five, outside of OSU? Oklahoma, Notre Dame, Alabama and USC at Nos. 2-5.

2014

THE HEADLINE: Big House sets U.S. soccer attendance mark
THE SYNOPSIS: For some reason, this post eclipsed the century mark in the comments section.  And, if I remember correctly, it would’ve been twice the century mark if not for the myriad comments I had to delete.

2014

THE HEADLINE: Nebraska still has 1,000 student tickets for a lousy home schedule
THE SYNOPSIS: Of course, all of those tickets were ultimately gobbled up.  The Cornhuskers currently hold the record for the longest sellout streak in college football history at 375.  That streak dates all the way back to 1962.  NU, though, might have to play loose with numbers if that streak is to continue amidst the pandemic.

2011

THE HEADLINE: Applebee’s serves as neighborhood bar and battle ground for UT-OU knife fight
THE SYNOPSIS: The Red River Shootout’s slogan?  “Fightin’ Good in the Neighborhood.”

2010

THE HEADLINE: Vandy drops ‘interim’ from HC Robbie Caldwell’s title
THE SYNOPSIS: Cladwell earned just for introducing “turkey inseminating crew” into the college football lexicon.

Oklahoma legend, College Football Hall of Famer Rickey Dixon, 53, loses battle with ALS

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One of the greatest players in the storied history of Oklahoma football is finally at peace.

In 2013, Rickey Dixon was diagnosed with ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s Disease.  Nearly seven years later, the standout former Oklahoma football player lost his battle with the insidious disease.  Dixon, 53, is survived by his wife, Lorraine, and four children.

Dixon played his college football for the Sooners from 1984-87.  As a junior and senior, Dixon earned first-team All-Big Eight honors.  As a senior, Dixon was a consensus All-American and winner of the Jim Thorpe Award, given annually to the nation’s top defensive back.

In January of last year, it was announced that Dixon would be inducted as a member of the College Football Hall of Fame Class of 2019.  Because of his disease, Dixon, confined to a wheelchair, wasn’t able to make it into his former stadium for a ceremony honoring him at a Sooners game last fall.  He was, though, able to make it to Norman to watch it.

OU, in conjunction with the NFF and College Hall of Fame, honored Dixon at halftime of the Sooners’ 2019 season-opening game vs. Houston. Dixon, who was able to travel to Norman from his home in DeSoto, Texas, that weekend, watched the game at the house of his collegiate head coach, Barry Switzer.

Switzer was the first to confirm the passing of one of his former players.

“Ever since he left OU, Rickey has been regarded as one of the finest football players in school history,” said OU Vice President and Athletics Director Joe Castiglione in a statement, “and his enshrinement last year into the College Football Hall of Fame is certainly validation of that. As much as any of his accomplishments on the field, however, he should be remembered for his extreme courage and spirit of perseverance. Overcoming the daily physical struggles he faced the last several years is a testament to his determination, to his resolve and to his fighter’s mentality, as well as to those closest to him who provided so much loving support. When we think of Rickey we will reminisce about everything he achieved during and after his playing career, and we extend our sincerest condolences to his wife Lorraine, their children and the entire Dixon family.”