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Bill proposed in New York aims to share college athletics revenue directly with student-athletes

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As the state of California moves forward with a push adopt a law that would allow student-athletes to receive compensation for the use of their name and likeness, a new bill proposed in New York aims to go one step farther. Senator Kevin Parker has proposed a bill that would allow student-athletes to be compensated directly from the school’s annual revenue.

As written, Senate Bill S6722A in New York seeks to allow student-athletes (including college football players) to be able to receive compensation for the use of their name, likeness or image; the ability to hire an agent; and to receive an even distribution directly from the school from the university’s athletics revenue. The bill intends to require schools to set aside 15 percent of revenue earned from ticket sales and distribute that evenly among every student-athlete at the school.

This could impact three FBS schools in New York; Syracuse, Buffalo, and Army. New York also has a handful of FCS programs as well, including Fordham, Stony Brook, and Colgate. If the bill gains any traction, it would impact each school differently due to the range in ticket revenue generated by each school. The proposed bill currently sits in committee right now and has not been scheduled for a date on the Senate floor in New York.

The NCAA will frown upon this bill, just as it has in California, and it would be expected schools in New York would not be in favor of such a bill. The NCAA has already threatened the state of California with potentially removing all championship events organized by the NCAA from the state. A similar threat to New York would be the typical response if needed. That may not impact the college football world much, although it could mean no NCAA basketball tournament games being played in New York, a state that has routinely hosted NCAA basketball tournament games across the state. The Pinstripe Bowl should be safe because it is not run by the NCAA (although the NCAA could refuse to certify the Pinstripe Bowl if it really wanted). But we are far from the point to have that discussion.

The Fair Pay for Play bill in California, which is currently waiting to be signed into law or vetoed by the state’s governor, merely allows student-athletes to seek representation and receive compensation for the use of their name, likeness, or image. This trend is certainly picking up steam, and it would not be a surprise to see other states attempt to challenge the NCAA’s model of amateurism.

After awful injury against Penn State, Buffalo punter Evan Finegan undergoes surgery

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Penn State’s 45-13 win over Buffalo flew under the radar for most on Saturday night given the amount of far more interesting games (though this one was close at halftime) on in the sport. For the most part, everything was as you’d expect in a routine win for a Big Ten program over a MAC one but there was a play that caused both Nittany Lions and Bulls fans to wince in unison after punter Evan Finegan suffered a horrific leg injury after a defender tried to block a punt in the third quarter.

Here’s video of the injury for those interested, which despite being a little blurry is still somewhat graphic:

Finegan had to be carted off as Beaver Stadium fell silent for nearly 10 minutes before applauding the sophomore as he left the field.

Luckily it looks like Finegan is handling the injury well and tweeted on Sunday morning that he was set to enter surgery to repair both his fibula and tibia:

The sophomore naturally appears done for the rest of the 2019 season, which is a shame after he was just named to the Ray Guy Award watch list and was hoping to build on first year as a starter in which he averaged 41.8 yards per punt.

Backup quarterback Kyle Vantrease took over as the punter following Finegan’s injury for the Bulls and might be pressed into duty the rest of the year for the team.

Four fumbles cost Buffalo in Dollar General Bowl as Troy celebrates third-straight bowl victory

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Buffalo (10-4) had a case of fumblitis in the Dollar General Bowl Saturday night, and it cost them. The Bulls were defeated by Troy (10-3), 42-32, as the Bulls fumbled the football six times, losing four.

In the third quarter, Troy managed to pull off the kind of feat you are probably more likely to see from a triple-option offense like Army. The Trojans managed to keep the Buffalo offense off the field for the entire third quarter. The Trojans opened the half with the football and scored. They then pulled off a brilliantly executed onside kick to keep possession of the football and drove the ball down to the six-yard line. But a fumble by B.J. Smith was picked up by Buffalo’s Tyrone Hill, who raced down the field 93 yards for a defensive touchdown to give Buffalo the lead, 24-21.

Troy’s offense went right back to work on the ensuing possession though, traveling 69 yards over 12 plays to retake the lead, 28-24, on a Damion Willis touchdown reception from the two-yard line. After sitting on the sideline or in the locker room for a little more than an hour, Buffalo’s offense finally got back on the field early in the fourth quarter, only to go three-and-out. Troy would add to their lead on the next drive with a quick three-play drive for a touchdown. Sawyer Smith completed a 45-yard touchdown pass to Sidney Davis to extend the lead to 35-24.

Buffalo was down but not out. The Bulls charged forward with a 10-play drive ending in the end zone with a Tyree Jackson touchdown pass to K.J. Osborn, and a successful two-point conversion brought Buffalo within three. The Buffalo defense then forced Troy to punt as the time was continuing to become a factor. Starting with the football at their 21-yard line and about three and a half minutes to play, Buffalo’s hopes of another score were quickly tossed aside when Jackson fumbled the ball away. It took Troy just one play to run right up the middle for a dagger of a touchdown with Sidney Davis reaching the end zone on a 20-yard run on the first play from scrimmage.

Although this was the most successful season in Buffalo history, the Bulls see their season left unfulfilled. Buffalo lost the MAC Championship Game against Northern Illinois that came into the game with five losses and then end the year with a loss in a bowl game. Buffalo’s search for their first bowl victory in program history continues. Things may have ended on a sour note for Buffalo this season, but that should not take away from the continued success head coach Lance Leipold is having with the program. In his fourth season on the job, Leipold has coached Buffalo to a school-record for wins in a single season and the bar has been raised moving forward.

Neal Brown continues to be doing a solid job at Troy as well. The win over Buffalo clinched a third-consecutive 10-win season for the Trojans, each finishing with a victory in a bowl game. Troy has gone a combined 31-8 in the past three seasons after going 4-8 in Brown’s first season as head coach of the program in 2015.

The loss by Buffalo dropped the MAC to a woeful bowl record of 1-5 as the conference wrapped up its bowl schedule. Ohio scored the only bowl victory for the conference this season while the rest of the MAC’s bowl teams lost by a combined 70 points, including losses by both division winners in the conference this season. The Sun Belt Conference has one more team in action this bowl season (Arkansas State), and currently holds a bowl record of 3-1. The win by Troy clinched a winning bowl season for the conference for the third straight season (11-4 in bowl games since 2017).

Northern Illinois caps remarkable second half rally to beat Buffalo and capture MAC title

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Northern Illinois was out of it. Down 29-10, the Huskies had just thrown an interception and looked like they were about to get run out of Ford Field by Buffalo in the MAC Championship Game.

Never say never when it comes to #MACtion however.

The Huskies used a 35 yard touchdown pass to D.J. Brown in the final 70 seconds to cap off a remarkable second half rally to beat the Bulls 30-29 on Friday night in a thrilling start to conference championship weekend in college football.

After a lackluster first half in the school’s seventh title game appearance in the last nine years, QB Marcus Childers and company eventually found their groove on offense to turn a likely loss into a wild win. The signal-caller wound up throwing for an even 300 yards and four touchdowns, moving past an absolute arm punt of an interception early on to find Brown deep for the game-winning score and leading the team in rushing with 58 yards for good measure.

Not to be out done, Huskies star pass rusher Sutton Smith also flashed plenty in the game with numerous quarterback hurries and added two sacks in an impact performance down the stretch from the conference’s player of the year.

The rally stunned many on the Buffalo sidelines given their big early lead and the possibility of securing the school’s second conference title ever and first in a full decade. Quarterback Tyree Jackson threw for 252 yards and a pair of touchdowns on the big stage, but was harassed quite a bit by Smith in the second half and failed to move the sticks much after emerging from halftime. He did make several impressive throws in tight windows while hooking up with star receiver Anthony Johnson (124 yards, two scores) but the two just couldn’t get in position for a late field goal to nab the win in a game they controlled for much of the night.

Bulls tailback Jaret Patterson did set a school freshman record for rushing yards in a season after recording 72 on the ground in the game and found the end zone once (teammate Kevin Marks added another 72 yards and also had a TD) as the program set a single-season record for points scored and yards rushing in coming up just short of an 11th win.

As a result, NIU remains Buffalo’s boogeyman as the Huskies are the only program in the MAC the Bulls have not beaten since joining the conference — dropping to 0-11 overall since moving to the FBS level. A berth in either the Camellia Bowl or Dollar General Bowl likely awaits the team, which will no doubt be wondering what could have been despite reaching double-digit wins for the first time ever.

Rod Carey’s group may also be left wondering how that game came about but won’t argue with the final score, which gives the program their fifth MAC title overall and second with their head coach. The team had started slow to begin the year, ran off six straight wins and then were slumping coming into the weekend but used a little bit of magic when it mattered most to wind up as top dogs yet again as college football’s first championship trophy was handed out this season in Detroit.

Buffalo holds off Miami in shootout, maintains MAC East lead

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Tuesday night MACtion returned to the nation’s television screens — and streaming devices — and, as is ofttimes the case, it didn’t fail to deliver an entertaining appetizer to the weekend’s main course.

On the strength of six total touchdowns from the arm and legs of Tyree Jackson, Buffalo outlasted Miami (OH) in a wild 51-42 shootout to maintain control of the MAC East race.  The game was a back and forth affair throughout, featuring five ties and the same number of lead changes.

The Bulls took its biggest lead of the game at 42-28 with just under five minutes left in the third quarter; however, a 59-yard Gus Ragland pulled the RedHawks to within seven less than three minutes later.  A successful onsides kick after that score led to a Ragland one-yard touchdown run with just 17 seconds left in the third to once again knot the score, this time at 42-all.

Jaret Patterson‘s four-yard touchdown run — the only non-Jackson touchdown of the night for the Bulls — midway through the fourth stretched the lead to 48-42 as the point-after failed;  Adam Mitcheson‘s 37-yard field goal with 3:54 left put the game out of reach thanks to turnovers on the RedHawks’ final two possessions — a lost fumble with just over two minutes remaining and giving the ball back on downs just over a minute later.

The 6-7, 245-pound Jackson threw for a season-high 358 yards and three touchdown passes while adding another three touchdowns on the ground.  Anthony Johnson caught all three of Jackson’s touchdown passes, totaling a career-high 238 yards on his eight catches.

Ragland passed for 313 yards in a losing effort, his second straight 300-yard effort and third of the season. The senior also matched Jackson’s three touchdowns on the ground.

With the win, Buffalo improved to 5-0 in MAC play, while Miami fell to 3-2.  If Ohio can get past Western Michigan (6-3 overall, 4-1 in MAC play) Thursday night, the Bobcats would exit Week 10 a game behind the Bulls at 4-1 in the conference and keep the two East teams on a collision course for a Nov. 14 meeting that will likely decide the division’s representative in the conference championship game.