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College Football in Coronavirus Quarantine: On this day in CFT history, including Michigan AD proclaiming Brady Hoke wasn’t on the hot seat less than five months before Hoke was fired

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The sports world, including college football, had essentially screeched to a halt in the spring as countries around the world battled the coronavirus pandemic. As such, there was a dearth of college football news as the sport went into a COVID-induced hibernation.  Slowly, though, the game is coming back to life.  Hopefully.

That being said, we thought it might be fun to go back through the CollegeFootballTalk archives that stretch back to 2009 and take a peek at what transpired in the sport on this date.

So, without further ado — ok, one further ado — here’s what happened in college football on July 28, by way of our team of CFT writers both past and present.

(P.S.: If any of our readers have ideas on posts they’d like to read during this college football down-time, leave your suggestions in the comments section.  Mailbag, maybe?)

2019

THE HEADLINE: No longer enrolled at Alabama, could Eyabi Anoma be in play for Maryland?
THE SYNOPSIS: In the end, the answer was no.  The five-star 2018 linebacker ultimately transferred to Houston.  In February of this year, however, Anoma was dismissed by UH for violating unspecified team rules. Last month, he announced he was transferring to FCS Tennessee-Martin.

2017

THE HEADLINE: Coastal Carolina head coach Joe Moglia will miss 2017 season to recover from health issues
THE SYNOPSIS: In January of 2019, Moglia stepped down as head coach.  He still, though, maintains “executive authority” over the Chanticleers football program.

2016

THE HEADLINE: Ex-Alabama LB Christian Bell announces transfer to Wisconsin
THE SYNOPSIS: Nearly four years later, Bell moved on from Wisconsin to Illinois.

2015

THE HEADLINE: Frank Beamer wants Hokies to stay in-house for a successor
THE SYNOPSIS: That would’ve likely meant long-time defensive coordinator Bud Foster.  Or even Beamer’s then-assistant — and son  — Shane Beamer.  In the end, it was Justin Fuente who replaced Beamer after he retired following the 2015 season.   Foster stayed on for another four seasons before his own retirement.  Shane Beamer, meanwhile, joined the Georgia coaching staff for the 2016 season.

2014

THE HEADLINE: Michigan AD says Brady Hoke isn’t on hot seat
THE SYNOPSIS: Hoke was fired less than five months later.  In four seasons with the Wolverines, Hoke went 31-20 overall and 18-14 in Big Ten play.  After winning 11 games his first season in Ann Arbor, Hoke won nine, seven and five games the last three.  In January, he was named as the head coach at San Diego State.  For the second time.

2010

THE HEADLINE: 1986 Miami Hurricanes top most-hated list
THE SYNOPSIS: This is for all of sports.  Not just college football, mind you.  Another Miami squad, the 1990 version, came in at No. 11 of the SI.com Top 25.  Others from college football included USC’s 2005 team (15th) and Notre Dame’s 1993 squad (17th).

2009

THE HEADLINE: Another ‘Nippany’ Lion popped for DUI
THE SYNOPSIS: Get it?  See what we did there?

College Football in Coronavirus Quarantine: On this day in CFT history, including Johnny Manziel leaving Manning Passing Academy and denying his illness was a hangover

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The sports world, including college football, had essentially screeched to a halt in the spring as countries around the world battled the coronavirus pandemic. As such, there was a dearth of college football news as the sport went into a COVID-induced hibernation.  Slowly, though, the game is coming back to life.  Hopefully.

That being said, we thought it might be fun to go back through the CollegeFootballTalk archives that stretch back to 2009 and take a peek at what transpired in the sport on this date.

So, without further ado — ok, one further ado — here’s what happened in college football on July 14, by way of our team of CFT writers both past and present.

(P.S.: If any of our readers have ideas on posts they’d like to read during this college football down-time, leave your suggestions in the comments section.  Mailbag, maybe?)

2019

THE HEADLINE: Conference USA athletic directors have reportedly discussed trading schools with other leagues
THE SYNOPSIS: Most notably, this would’ve involved a realignment that included the Sun Belt Conference.  In the midst of the pandemic, chatter over some sort realignment between the two Group of Fives is still bubbling.

2017

THE HEADLINE: Oregon dismisses star WR Darren Carrington two weeks after DUII arrest
THE SYNOPSIS: This was a significant blow to the Ducks offense.  The year before, Carrington’s 606 yards receiving last year were tops on the team, while his five receiving touchdowns were tied for first.  His 43 catches were second on the team. Carrington subsequently moved on to Utah. After one season with the Utes, Carrington went undrafted.  He signed with Dallas in August of 2018.

2016

THE HEADLINE: Reports of Tom Herman meeting with Baylor labeled ‘completely ridiculous and absolutely false’
THE SYNOPSIS: Then the head coach at Houston, Herman was mentioned as a possible replacement for the disgraced Art Briles.  The Bears job, though, ultimately went to Matt Rhule.  Herman, meanwhile, took the head job at Texas four months later.

2014

THE HEADLINE: CFP unveils new title trophy
THE SYNOPSIS: The College Football Playoff replaced the BCS starting with the 2014 campaign.

2014

THE HEADLINE: Will Muschamp faces hot-seat talk head-on
THE SYNOPSIS: With a 6-5 record at the time, Muschamp was fired by Florida with a game left in the 2014 regular season. A little over a year later, South Carolina hired the Auburn defensive coordinator as its head coach.

2013

THE HEADLINE: Johnny Manziel leaves Manning Academy early; camp denies report of hangover
THE SYNOPSIS: Johnny Football, y’all!

2011

THE HEADLINE: Georgia Tech to vacate ’09 ACC title, placed on four years probation
THE SYNOPSIS: The sanctions revolved around college football players receiving impermissible benefits.

2010

THE HEADLINE: Vandy’s Bobby Johnson retires from coaching; Robbie Caldwell named interim coach
THE SYNOPSIS: That move opened the door for “turkey inseminating crew” to enter the college football lexicon.

2009

THE HEADLINE: Arkansas St. CB Shot, Booted From Team
THE SYNOPSIS: Get shot AND dismissed?  That’s a rough day.  Of course, Paul Stephens was shot while allegedly burglarizing a residence, so there’s that.

ACC, Pitt headline Bednarik Award preseason watch list

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The Bednarik Award is the first major honor to release its watch list for the upcoming season.  But it certainly won’t be the last.  Far from it, actually.

In a release Monday, the Bednarik Award announced a 90-player strong watch list that represents every FBS conference in the country.  The Bednarik Award has been presented annually since 1996 to the nation’s top player on the defensive side of the ball.

The ACC leads all conferences with 18 watch listers, with the Pac- 12 (13), SEC (11) and Big 12 (10) the only others in double digits.  The Big Ten, the remaining Power Five, placed nine players.

Wit eight, Conference USA led all Group of Five leagues.  Next up was the AAC’s six, followed by the Mountain West Conference and Sun Belt Conference with five each and four for the MAC.

School-wise, reigning national champion LSU, Pitt and USC placed three players apiece.  A handful of other schools put two players each on the watch list:

  • Alabama
  • Appalachian State
  • Cal
  • Duke
  • Florida State
  • Georgia
  • Miami
  • Michigan
  • Notre Dame
  • Oregon
  • San Diego State
  • TCU
  • Texas
  • UAB
  • Virginia
  • Virginia Tech
  • Washington

No finalists from a year ago remain as both the winner (Ohio State’s Chase Young) and the two runners-up (Auburn’s Derrick Brown, Clemson’s Isaiah Simmons) have since moved on to the NFL.  There are, though, three semifinalists for last year’s award that are back this season — Penn State’s Micah Parson, LSU’s Derek Stingley and Florida State’s Marvin Wilson.

For the complete Bednarik Award watch list, click HERE.

College Football in Coronavirus Quarantine: On this day in CFT history, including Navy officially shedding 135 years of football independence

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The sports world, including college football, has essentially screeched to a halt as countries around the world battle the coronavirus pandemic. As such, there’s a dearth of college football news as spring practices have all but been canceled at every level of the sport. And there’s even some concern that the health issue could have an impact on the 2020 college football campaign.

In that vein, we thought it might be fun to go back through the CollegeFootballTalk archives that stretch back to 2009 and take a peek at what transpired in the sport on this date.

So, without further ado — ok, one further ado — here’s what happened in college football on July 1, by way of our team of CFT writers both past and present.

(P.S.: If any of our readers have ideas on posts they’d like to read during this college football hiatus, leave your suggestions in the comments section.  Mailbag, maybe?)

2019

THE HEADLINE: Army announces 76-man signing class
THE SYNOPSIS: USA! USA! USA!

2018

THE HEADLINE: It’s July 1, so Liberty is now officially college football’s newest FBS program; Idaho drops to FCS
THE SYNOPSIS: Two years later, Liberty won its first bowl game. And saw attrition from players citing “racial insensitivity.”

2017

THE HEADLINE: It’s July 1, which means UAB and Coastal Carolina are official FBS members now
THE SYNOPSIS: UAB went 8-5 in its second first FBS season.  Coastal Carolina went 3-9.

2016

THE HEADLINE: BYU still wants to join a Power 5 conference
THE SYNOPSIS: Four years later, the want is still there. So that’s something?

2015

THE HEADLINE: Dependence Day: Navy officially joins AAC
THE SYNOPSIS: From our post that day:

For the first 135 years of its existence, Navy played as a football independent.  With Independence Day just three days away, the Midshipmen have officially shed that football independence for its first-ever conference home.

2013

THE HEADLINE: It’s officially conference moving day for myriad FBS programs
THE SYNOPSIS: Are you sensing a theme with this First of July date?  Pitt and Syracuse officially joined the ACC. And the WAC ceased to exist as a football conference.

2012

THE HEADLINE: Boise State officially leaving for the Big East
THE SYNOPSIS: Boise State is still a member of the Mountain West Conference.  So there’s that.

2011

THE HEADLINE: Dawn of new conference era brings yawns, shoulder shrugs from some coaches
THE SYNOPSIS: From our post that day.  Again:

The Pac-10 has officially became the Pac-12 with the additions of Colorado (Big 12) and Utah (Mountain West). The Big Ten officially became the, well, Big Ten despite the addition of Nebraska (Big 12) as its 12th member. Boise State will now be a full-fledged voting member of the Mountain West after bolting the depleted and beleaguered WAC, while BYU (Mountain West) has shed its conference clothes and exchanged them for football independence.

2010

THE HEADLINE: UGA AD Damon Evans busted for DUI
THE SYNOPSIS: After the red panties scandal, Evans rehabbed his image.  And resurfaced as the athletic director at Maryland.

NCAA Council formally approves six-week preseason model for football, which will begin July 13 for teams that start season Sept. 5

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The NCAA is proceeding with a significant step toward prepping for the 2020 college football season.

Earlier this month, it was confirmed that the NCAA Div. I Oversight Committee was crafting a plan that would shape the path college football programs would take to prepare for the upcoming season.  Last week, the NCAA announced that it has finalized its proposal for a preseason model for the sport.  However, the plan still needed the approval of the NCAA Division I Council.

Thursday, that expected thumbs-up came to fruition as the council has approved what will essentially be a six-week preseason for college football.  The NCAA writes that, “[a]ssuming a first game on Sept. 5, the model begins summer access activities July 13 and adds meetings and walk-throughs July 24.  Preseason practice begins Aug. 7.” Schools that open the seasoning Week 0 (Aug. 29), all of the dates would get seven days subtracted from them.  It’s unclear if teams whose first games are Sept. 3 will follow the Sept. 5 model or not.

The activities mentioned do not include the ongoing voluntary on-campus workouts.

As for the particulars?  The NCAA referred to its previous release as a guideline:

… student-athletes may be required to participate in up to eight hours of weight training, conditioning and film review per week (not more than two hours of film review per week) from July 13-23.

Then, from July 24 through Aug. 6, student-athletes may be required to participate in up to 20 hours of countable athletically related activities per week (not more than four hours per day) as follows:

— Up to eight hours per week for weight training and conditioning.
— Up to six hours per week for walk-throughs, which may include the use of a football.
— Up to six hours per week for meetings, which may include film review, team meetings, position meetings, one-on-one meetings, etc.
— During this 14-day period, student-athletes are required to get at least two days off.

The model does not make any adjustments to the legislated 29-day preseason practice period. In the previous example, the school’s preseason practice period would begin Aug. 7 with a five-day acclimatization period, followed by the opportunity for up to 25 on-field practices.