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Transfer portal pulls in Eastern Michigan DB Jalen Phelps

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Go ahead and add Eastern Michigan to the burgeoning list of schools bitten by the football transfer portal.

According to 247Sports.com, EMU’s Jalen Phelps has entered the NCAA transfer database.  An Eastern Michigan football official subsequently confirmed that the defensive back has signaled his intention to leave the Eagles.

As of yet, the player has not confirmed his intentions publicly.

Now, for what’s seemingly becoming a daily disclaimer when it comes to transfers.

As we’ve stated myriad times in the past, a player can remove his name from the portal and remain at the same school. At this point, though, other programs are permitted to contact a player without receiving permission from his current football program.

NCAA bylaws also permit schools to pull a portal entrant’s scholarship at the end of the semester in which he entered it.

Phelps was a three-star member of the Eastern Michigan football Class of 2016.  The Georgia product will be leaving EMU as a graduate transfer.  The 2020 season will be his final year of eligibility.

In his four seasons with their Eagles, Phelps appeared in 42 games, starting nine of those.  He played in just four this past season, which allowed him to take a redshirt and preserve a season of eligibility.

In those 42 appearances, Phelps was credited with 88 tackles and eight passes defensed.

Phelps is at least the second Eastern Michigan football player to leave in a little over a month.  In mid-June, defensive lineman Ty Eddington entered the portal.

EMU is coming off a 6-7 campaign that ended with a QuickLane Bowl loss to Pitt.  The Eagles have now played in a bowl game three of the past four years, the only time in school history that’s ever happened.

Chris Creighton’s 28 wins (in six seasons) are already fifth-most in the program’s history.

 

MAC schools stand to lose millions because of Big Ten going to conference only schedule

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No conference will feel the financial pinch of one of the Power Five’s domino-tipping decisions more than MAC football.

Thursday afternoon, the Big Ten confirmed reports that it will be going with a conference-only football schedule for the 2020 season.  That means, of course, that the 14 members of the league will forego playing a combined 42 non-conference games.  Nine of those 42 were to come against other Power Five programs.  Those schools are more well-positioned financially to take any hit.

Then there’s MAC football.

All told, 11 games were scheduled to be played between members of the Mid-American Conference and the Big Ten.  Ball State (Indiana, Michigan), Bowling Green (Illinois, Ohio State), Central Michigan (Nebraska, Northwestern) and Northern Illinois (Iowa, Maryland) each had two games on this season’s docket against Big Ten teams.

According to USA Today, MAC schools stand to lose a combined $10.5 million from those canceled football games.  Bowling Green and Central Michigan will take $2.2 million and $2.15 million hits, respectively.  Kent State would’ve been paid $1.5 million for its game against Penn State.

At this point, it’s unclear if the MAC schools will have any legal recourse to recoup the money.  Rest assured, though, all of those impacted by the Big Ten’s decision are looking into that angle as we speak.

“Every member of the NCAA is attempting to navigate these very difficult times in college athletics,” Bowling Green athletic director Bob Moosbrugger said in a statement. “While we are certainly disappointed that our student-athletes will not have the opportunity to compete in non-conference games against Big Ten opponents, we understand that difficult decisions need to be made.

“The decision by the Big Ten is the tip of the iceberg. Ten FBS conferences have signed a college football playoff agreement with an expectation that we will work together for the good of college football. If we are to solve these challenges and be truly dedicated to protecting the health and safety of our student-athletes, we need to do a better job of working together.”

It should also be noted that BYU will be directly impacted by the Big Ten’s move as well.  The football independent has two paycheck games scheduled against B1G opponents this season, at Michigan State and at Minnesota.  At this point, it’s unclear how much BYU stands to lose.

College Football in Coronavirus Quarantine: On this day in CFT history, including, more than a decade ago, Ozzie Newsome keeping the door open to returning to Alabama as AD

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The sports world, including college football, has essentially screeched to a halt as countries around the world battle the coronavirus pandemic. As such, there’s a dearth of college football news as spring practices have all but been canceled at every level of the sport. And there’s even some concern that the health issue could have an impact on the 2020 college football campaign.

In that vein, we thought it might be fun to go back through the CollegeFootballTalk archives that stretch back to 2009 and take a peek at what transpired in the sport on this date.

So, without further ado — ok, one further ado — here’s what happened in college football on June 28, by way of our team of CFT writers both past and present.

(P.S.: If any of our readers have ideas on posts they’d like to read during this college football hiatus, leave your suggestions in the comments section.  Mailbag, maybe?)

2019

THE HEADLINE: Injury knocks Tua Tagovailoa out of Manning Passing Academy
THE SYNOPSIS: This was but one of a string of health issues (hand, knee, ankle, ankle again, hip) that hampered the talented Alabama quarterback during his time in college football.

2018

THE HEADLINE: Heart condition ends four-star 2018 Penn State signee’s college career before it ever got started
THE SYNOPSIS: That was the bad news for Nana Asiedu.  The good news?  It was football, and the care he got in Happy Valley, that may have saved his life.

2017

THE HEADLINE: Eastern Michigan extends Chris Creighton through 2022
THE SYNOPSIS: Since then, EMU has played in bowl games in both 2018 and 2019.  That’s the first time the Eagles have played in back-to-back bowl games in school history.  The program is, though, seeking its first bowl win since 1987.

2015

THE HEADLINE: Continuing Penn State series ‘a priority’ for new Pitt AD
THE SYNOPSIS: The rivals last played in 2019, the 100th meeting between the schools in college football.  The most recent word is that the series “might be revisited at some point after 2030.”

2014

THE HEADLINE: 2015 QB recruit who gave USC a verbal when he was 13 decommits
THE SYNOPSIS: David Sills ultimately moved on to West Virginia… as a very successful wide receiver.

2012

THE HEADLINE: Playoff selection committee to reportedly create weekly Top 20
THE SYNOPSIS: This turned out to be a Top 25.  And it is released weekly after the midpoint of the regular season.

2009

THE HEADLINE: Ozzie Newsome Keeps ‘Bama A.D. Door Ajar
THE SYNOPSIS: The former Alabama great never returned to his alma mater as athletic director.  Instead, he remained in Baltimore as the highly-successful GM of the Ravens until stepping down from that job in 2018.

Eastern Michigan DL Ty Eddington enters transfer portal

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Eastern Michigan is the latest to be on the losing end of a football portal maneuver.

According to 247Sports.com, Ty Eddington (pictured, center) has opted to enter the NCAA transfer database.  It’s the first step in a potential move away from the Eastern Michigan football team.

Eddington will be leaving the Eagles as a graduate transfer.  The upcoming season will serve as the defensive lineman’s final season of eligibility.

Now, for what’s seemingly becoming a daily disclaimer when it comes to transfers.

As we’ve stated myriad times in the past, a player can remove his name from the portal and remain at the same school. At this point, though, other programs are permitted to contact a player without receiving permission from his current football program.

NCAA bylaws also permit schools to pull a portal entrant’s scholarship at the end of the semester in which he entered it.

Eddington came to the Eagles as a junior college transfer prior to the 2018 season.  The past two years, Eddington has played in 15 games.  The lineman started six of those appearances, including three of four games in which he played in 2019.

In his time with the MAC school, Eddington was credited with 27 tackles, one tackle for loss, one pass defensed and a half sack.

EMU is coming off a 6-7 campaign that ended with a QuickLane Bowl loss to Pitt.  The Eagles have now played in a bowl game three of the past four years, the only time in school history that’s ever happened.

Creighton’s 28 wins (in six seasons) are already fifth-most in the program’s history.

NCAA Council formally approves six-week preseason model for football, which will begin July 13 for teams that start season Sept. 5

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The NCAA is proceeding with a significant step toward prepping for the 2020 college football season.

Earlier this month, it was confirmed that the NCAA Div. I Oversight Committee was crafting a plan that would shape the path college football programs would take to prepare for the upcoming season.  Last week, the NCAA announced that it has finalized its proposal for a preseason model for the sport.  However, the plan still needed the approval of the NCAA Division I Council.

Thursday, that expected thumbs-up came to fruition as the council has approved what will essentially be a six-week preseason for college football.  The NCAA writes that, “[a]ssuming a first game on Sept. 5, the model begins summer access activities July 13 and adds meetings and walk-throughs July 24.  Preseason practice begins Aug. 7.” Schools that open the seasoning Week 0 (Aug. 29), all of the dates would get seven days subtracted from them.  It’s unclear if teams whose first games are Sept. 3 will follow the Sept. 5 model or not.

The activities mentioned do not include the ongoing voluntary on-campus workouts.

As for the particulars?  The NCAA referred to its previous release as a guideline:

… student-athletes may be required to participate in up to eight hours of weight training, conditioning and film review per week (not more than two hours of film review per week) from July 13-23.

Then, from July 24 through Aug. 6, student-athletes may be required to participate in up to 20 hours of countable athletically related activities per week (not more than four hours per day) as follows:

— Up to eight hours per week for weight training and conditioning.
— Up to six hours per week for walk-throughs, which may include the use of a football.
— Up to six hours per week for meetings, which may include film review, team meetings, position meetings, one-on-one meetings, etc.
— During this 14-day period, student-athletes are required to get at least two days off.

The model does not make any adjustments to the legislated 29-day preseason practice period. In the previous example, the school’s preseason practice period would begin Aug. 7 with a five-day acclimatization period, followed by the opportunity for up to 25 on-field practices.