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College Football in Coronavirus Quarantine: On this day in CFT history

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The sports world, including college football, has essentially screeched to a halt as countries around the world battle the coronavirus pandemic. As such, there’s a dearth of college football news as spring practices have all but been canceled at every level of the sport. And there’s even some concern that the health issue could have an impact on the 2020 college football campaign.

In that vein, we thought it might be fun to go back through the CollegeFootballTalk archives that stretch back to 2009 and take a peek at what transpired in the sport on this date.

So, without further ado — ok, one further ado — here’s what happened in college football on April 6, by way of our team of CFT writers both past and present.

(P.S.: If any of our readers have ideas on posts they’d like to read during this hiatus, leave your suggestions in the comments section.  Mailbag, maybe?)

2019

THE HEADLINE: Illinois athletic director sets expectations for 2019 at bowl game or bust: “I fully expect it to happen”
THE SYNOPSIS: Josh Whitman‘s not-so-subtle ultimatum proved prescient, with Lovie Smith leading Illinois to the Redbox Bowl.  It marked the Illini’s first postseason appearance since 2014.  Smith, incidentally, is now 15-34 in four seasons in Champaign.

2018

THE HEADLINE: A&M’s Koda Martin recovering after heat stroke, 106-degree fever left lineman near death
THE SYNOPSIS: This was certainly the scariest situation in the spring of 2018.  Martin ultimately fully recovered.  He also ultimately transferred to Syracuse two months later.  Orange head coach Dino Babers is also Martin’s father-in-law.  The offensive lineman’s father, Kirk Martin, was the Orange’s quarterbacks coach.

2016

THE HEADLINE: Kentucky signee who said Urban, OSU ‘treated me like crap’ clarifies quotes, apologizes
THE SYNOPSIS: “I was at Ohio State having a private meeting with Urban Meyer. I had gone up to camp there, and they had treated me like a piece of meat, just treated me like crap.” — Landon Young, late March.

“The quotes that were attributed to me in an article… were mistaken and in no way reflect my feelings toward coach Urban Meyer and the Ohio State program.” — Landon Young, a week later.

2015

THE HEADLINE: 410-pound TE listed as co-starter on Baylor’s post-spring depth chart
THE SYNOPSIS: The previous season, LaQuan McGowan was a 390-pound offensive lineman who set the college football world aflame with an 18-yard touchdown reception in the Cotton Bowl loss to Michigan State. In 2015, the senior caught two passes for 23 yards.  Both of those catches were touchdowns.  He also ran the ball once for two yards.  He finished his collegiate career with three catches.  All three of which went for scores.

2013

THE HEADLINE: Seven-year-old battling brain cancer scores TD in Nebraska’s spring game
THE SYNOPSIS: That part of Jack Hoffman’s story was awesome.  It then got even better.  After the cancer went into remission, then returned, then went into remission again, Hoffman was offered a scholarship to play football at Midland University in Nebraska.

2012

THE HEADLINE: Tragic: Minnesota confirms death of linebacker
THE SYNOPSIS: The cause of 22-year-old Gary Tinsley‘s death was later determined to be due to an enlarged heart.

2009

THE HEADLINE: PLAYBOY CANCELING ALL-AMERICAN TEAM WEEKEND*
THE SYNOPSIS: For those who read Playboy just for the All-American teams (winkwink nudgenudge), this was a stiff blow.

(*Yes, back in the day, we used to scream out our headlines at our readers in all-caps. The move to NBC a couple of months later mercifully ended that practice.)

College Football in Coronavirus Quarantine: On this day in CFT history

college football
Getty Images
1 Comment

The sports world, including college football, has essentially screeched to a halt as countries around the world battle the coronavirus pandemic. As such, there’s a dearth of college football news as spring practices have all but been canceled at every level of the sport. And there’s even some concern that the health issue could have an impact on the 2020 college football campaign.

In that vein, we thought it might be fun to go back through the CollegeFootballTalk archives and take a peek at what transpired in the sport on this date.

So, without further ado — ok, one further ado — here’s what happened in college football on April 5, by way of our team of CFT writers both past and present.

(P.S.: If any of our readers have ideas on posts they’d like to read during this hiatus, leave your suggestions in the comments section.  Mailbag, maybe?)

2018

THE HEADLINE: Bear Bryant’s great-grandson commits to play for Alabama
THE SYNOPSIS: Paul Tyson was rated as a four-star 2019 recruit on the 247Sports.com composite.  The Alabama coaching legend’s kin took a redshirt for his true freshman season after appearing in one game.  He’ll be a part of the competition to replace Tua Tagovailoa under center.  If when prep work for the 2020 campaign restarts, of course.

2018

THE HEADLINE: Ohio State committee approves two-year extension for Urban Meyer
THE SYNOPSIS: The extension would’ve kept Meyer in Columbus through the 2022 season.  Instead, eight months later, Meyer announced he was retiring at the end of the 2018 season.

2017

THE HEADLINE: Penn State trustee who was “running out of sympathy” for “so-called victims” of Jerry Sandusky not seeking second term
THE SYNOPSIS: For once, the shipdit made the right call.

2017

THE HEADLINE: Ex-Oklahoma football player accused of pimping out former Sooner cheerleader
THE SYNOPSIS: There’s a headline you don’t see every day.  Lawrence Moore was a 2013 signee.  The cornerback played in two games as a true freshman for Oklahoma before leaving the program.  Micah Madison Parker was a member of OU’s cheerleading squad during Moore’s lone season with the Sooners.

2015

THE HEADLINE: UGA’s three-man QB battle whittled down to two?
THE SYNOPSIS: Brice Ramsey, Faton Bauta and Jacob Park entered the spring as part of the under-center competition.  Exiting, it was down to Bauta and Ramsey.  In the end, neither started the opener.  That honor instead went to Greyson Lambert, who transferred in from Virginia in June.

2012

THE HEADLINE: Updated: Bobby Petrino placed on administrative leave
THE SYNOPSIS: Earlier in the day, the then-Arkansas head coach claimed he was alone on his motorcycle when he wrecked earlier in the month.  As it turned out, a female who wasn’t his wife was on the bike with him.  Jessica Dorrell became the student-athlete development coordinator for football the previous month.  Five days later, Petrino, who admitted to an affair with Dorrell, was fired.

2012

THE HEADLINE: USC it is: top ’13 QB tabs Trojans over Sooners, Tide, Huskies
THE SYNOPSIS: Max Browne chose USC over Oklahoma, Alabama and home-state Washington.  Redshirting as a true freshman, Browne spent the 2014 and 2015 seasons as Cody Kessler’s primary backup. After winning the starting job in 2016, Browne lost his job to Sam Darnold following a 1-2 start.  A few months later, Browne transferred to Pitt.

2010

THE HEADLINE: Big Ten ‘super conference’ talk gaining momentum?
THE SYNOPSIS: The rumor du jour was that the Big Ten would move to 16 teams.  11 teams at the time, the Midwestern conference would instead add just three additional schools.  Nebraska in 2011, and Maryland and Rutgers in 2014.

College Football in Coronavirus Quarantine: On this day in CFT history

college football
Getty Images
Leave a comment

The sports world, including college football, has essentially screeched to a halt as countries around the world battle the coronavirus pandemic. As such, there’s a dearth of college football news as spring practices have all but been canceled at every level of the sport. And there’s even some concern that the health issue could have an impact on the 2020 college football campaign.

In that vein, we thought it might be fun to go back through the CollegeFootballTalk archives and take a peek at what transpired in the sport on this date.

So, without further ado — ok, one further ado — here’s what happened in college football on April 2, by way of our team of CFT writers both past and present.

(P.S.: If any of our readers have ideas on posts they’d like to read during this hiatus, leave your suggestions in the comments section.  Mailbag, maybe?)

2019

THE HEADLINE: Illinois becomes sixth B1G school to allow in-game beer sales
THE SYNOPSIS: Indiana subsequently joined Illinois, Maryland, Minnesota, Ohio State, Purdue and Rutgers in Big Ten schools permitting alcohol sales at football games.  That’s exactly half of the conference.

2018

THE HEADLINE: LeBron James’ company challenges Alabama football over barbershop videos
THE SYNOPSIS: How I long for the days of inane offseason brouhahas.  Never thought I would miss things like this.  Until now.

2017

THE HEADLINE: New Tennessee AD John Currie says Butch Jones ‘on the right trajectory’
THE SYNOPSIS: Seven months, 10 days after that public vote of confidence, Currie canned Jones.  The head coach finished with a 34-27 record on Rocky Top.  What doomed him, though, was a 14-24 record in SEC play.  At the time of his dismissal, the Vols were 0-6 in the conference.

2015

THE HEADLINE: Cardale Jones comes full circle on playing school, and so should everyone else
THE SYNOPSIS: In October of 2012, the Ohio State quarterback famously tweeted, “Why should we have to go to class if we came here to play FOOTBALL? we ain’t come here to play SCHOOL, classes are POINTLESS.” Three years later, Jones tweeted, “still can’t believe I tweeted something as stupid as this but hey, we live and we learn.” In May of 2017, Jones received his degree from OSU.

2014

THE HEADLINE: FSU’s Nick O’Leary again involved in motorcycle accident
THE SYNOPSIS: The talented Florida State tight end suffered minor injuries in what was his second motorcycle accident in nine months.  O’Leary totaled 1,591 yards and 17 touchdowns on 114 receptions during his time with the Seminoles.  And, I don’t know if you’ve heard this, but his grandfather is golf legend Jack Nicklaus.

2012

THE HEADLINE: Updated: Petrino reportedly not wearing helmet at time of accident
THE SYNOPSIS: The only reason I’m using this?  It affords me to use the greatest.  Photo.  Ever. This was also before the fit hit the shan for Bobby Petrino in Fayetteville.

2010

THE HEADLINE: Irish recruit James dies in spring break accident
THE SYNOPSIS: Offensive lineman Matt James, who signed with Notre dame two months earlier, died after falling from a hotel balcony.  He chose the Golden Domers over his hometown Ohio State.

2009

THE HEADLINE: PISSY PETE SAYS BLASTING SANCHEZ WAS JUST A TEST
THE SYNOPSIS: Ah yes.  The good ol’ days.  When we could refer to then-USC head coach Pete Carroll as “Pissy Pete” for his treatment of Mark Sanchez, who had the audacity to leave the Trojans early for the NFL.

(*Yes, back in the day, we used to scream out our headlines at our readers in all-caps. The move to NBC a couple of months later mercifully ended that practice.)

Anonymous FBS athletic director: ‘If there’s no season, we will be f*****’

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If you didn’t realize how important college football is to an athletic department’s bottom line, this should highlight it.

In the midst of the spreading coronavirus pandemic, some connected to the game of college football are decidedly pessimistic that the upcoming season will be played. Others are expressing cautious optimism. For now, at least.

Brett McMurphy of The Stadium conducted a survey of 130 athletic directors with FBS programs, with 112 of them participating. According to McMurphy, the ADs “were asked to rank their optimism on the upcoming season being played from ‘1’ (will not be played) to ’10’ (definitely will be played).”

Not a single AD gave less than a “5” in response, meaning everyone who responded, at least at this time, feels there’s at least a 50-50 chance the season will go off as planned. A slight majority of respondents (51%) assigned either the numbers seven or eight in McMurphy’s survey. One-quarter of them were decidedly optimistic with either a nine or 10 as a response. Most of that optimism was on the part of Group of Five programs that, already financially reeling from the distilled NCAA’s revenue distribution last month, desperately need a college football season to be played.

If the college football season is to start on time — the first games are scheduled for Aug. 29 — what would be the absolute latest teams could start reconvening and prepping for the 2020 campaign? The answer you get depends on the individual you ask. Some would say early June at the absolute latest. Others have said the middle of July.

So, what if the season is canceled? Completely?

“If there’s no season, we will be f*****,” an anonymous AD told McMurphy.

A tweet from Ross Dellenger of SI.com very plainly illustrates how reliant athletic departments are on revenue from college football.

Suffice to say, if the 2020 college football season is completely wiped out, non-revenue sports will be cut. Lots of them will be shuttered, more than likely.

The good news, such as it is, is that the powers-that-be in the sport will go to great lengths to save the 2020 college football season. In fact, one report earlier today suggested that the season could start as late as January of next year. How that would work with players who are eligible for the 2021 NFL Draft would have to be worked out, as would myriad other issues.

While it’s way too early to form a concrete opinion, there’s little doubt that all connected to the sport will exhaust every option to save the 2020 college football season. And, if the season is canceled? It’ll mean we all have a helluva lot more to worry about than sports.

Big Ten extends suspension of all team activities through May 4

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Don’t expect any of your favorite Big Ten sports teams to be back in any sort of action in the month of April. On Friday afternoon, the Big Ten announced it will continue suspending all organized team activities through May 4 before re-evaluating the state of affairs in response to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

“This is an additional measure to the previously announced cancellation of all conference and non-conference competitions through the end of the academic year, including spring sports that compete beyond the academic year,” a statement from the Big Ten said on Friday. “The Conference also has previously announced a moratorium on all on- and off-campus recruiting activities for the foreseeable future.”

As far as football is concerned, that effectively keeps spring football from becoming a possibility around the conference until May, which makes it seem very unlikely any Big Ten school will get any more spring practices in this year. The Big Ten previously suspended all activities until April 6.

It has seemed unlikely spring football will be able to continue in the Big Ten and every other conference for weeks now as the sports world and beyond continues to adhere to updated guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control have stressed the urgent need to practice social distancing. And with the United States continuing to see more and more cases and deaths from the coronavirus outbreak, college football is far down on the list of priorities right now.

With the loss of so many spring football practices, coaches are working hard to figure out how to best prepare their respective programs for the upcoming 2020 season, assuming there even is one (one notable college football analyst would be shocked if we do see a football season). One idea that has been mentioned as a possibility would be the addition of more practices or activities during the summer, similar to NFL OTAs and minicamps.

But first, let’s just get this virus under control. If that means locking the country down, as Penn State head coach James Franklin would consider, so be it.