college football
Getty Images

Anonymous FBS athletic director: ‘If there’s no season, we will be f*****’

7 Comments

If you didn’t realize how important college football is to an athletic department’s bottom line, this should highlight it.

In the midst of the spreading coronavirus pandemic, some connected to the game of college football are decidedly pessimistic that the upcoming season will be played. Others are expressing cautious optimism. For now, at least.

Brett McMurphy of The Stadium conducted a survey of 130 athletic directors with FBS programs, with 112 of them participating. According to McMurphy, the ADs “were asked to rank their optimism on the upcoming season being played from ‘1’ (will not be played) to ’10’ (definitely will be played).”

Not a single AD gave less than a “5” in response, meaning everyone who responded, at least at this time, feels there’s at least a 50-50 chance the season will go off as planned. A slight majority of respondents (51%) assigned either the numbers seven or eight in McMurphy’s survey. One-quarter of them were decidedly optimistic with either a nine or 10 as a response. Most of that optimism was on the part of Group of Five programs that, already financially reeling from the distilled NCAA’s revenue distribution last month, desperately need a college football season to be played.

If the college football season is to start on time — the first games are scheduled for Aug. 29 — what would be the absolute latest teams could start reconvening and prepping for the 2020 campaign? The answer you get depends on the individual you ask. Some would say early June at the absolute latest. Others have said the middle of July.

So, what if the season is canceled? Completely?

“If there’s no season, we will be f*****,” an anonymous AD told McMurphy.

A tweet from Ross Dellenger of SI.com very plainly illustrates how reliant athletic departments are on revenue from college football.

Suffice to say, if the 2020 college football season is completely wiped out, non-revenue sports will be cut. Lots of them will be shuttered, more than likely.

The good news, such as it is, is that the powers-that-be in the sport will go to great lengths to save the 2020 college football season. In fact, one report earlier today suggested that the season could start as late as January of next year. How that would work with players who are eligible for the 2021 NFL Draft would have to be worked out, as would myriad other issues.

While it’s way too early to form a concrete opinion, there’s little doubt that all connected to the sport will exhaust every option to save the 2020 college football season. And, if the season is canceled? It’ll mean we all have a helluva lot more to worry about than sports.

SEC to begin allowing virtual instruction next week

Photo by Dannie Walls/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images
Leave a comment

The SEC is about to allow coaches to use remote tools to instruct their players, according to a report from Auburn Undercover on Friday.

Citing a memo sent to SEC athletic departments, Auburn Undercover says the new policy will go into effect beginning on Monday, March 30. According to the memo, coaching staff members will be allowed to provide “technical or tactical instruction” to players. Strength and conditioning coaches may still provide players with specific workouts to do on heir own, but no coaches may observe the players while working out.

In these times, having any kind of chance to interact with players is important, even if it must be done through a computer. It’s better than nothing, after all. And while it may not be a perfect substitute for spring football practices, it at least keeps the lines of communication within the program more open.

As previously reported, Oklahoma head coach Lincoln Riley was quoted in a radio interview as having a concern about the Big 12 not allowing coaches to make use of their virtual options the way coaches in the ACC have. Riley noted players in the ACC are able to receive video instruction and training gear through the mail. The Big 12 may change their policies in the next week to be more accommodating for coaches and players in a similar fashion to what the SEC is doing.

Kirk Herbstreit would be ‘shocked’ if college football is played this fall

college football
Getty Images
26 Comments

No college football this fall?  The drumbeat for such a possibility grows louder by the day.

In the midst of the growing coronavirus pandemic, Mack Brown earlier this week expressed concern about whether or not the college football season would be played as scheduled.  Whether it would be a partial season.  Or no season at all.

“There is a fear of ‘would we have a season?’ ‘Would we have a partial season?’ ‘What does a partial season mean,’” North Carolina head coach said. “There is a great concern because of the remedy that comes in with football.

“The biggest problem is you’re not sure when it ends, and we can’t get those answers at this point.”

Compared to one prominent college football personality, Brown is downright optimistic.

During a radio interview Thursday night, Kirk Herbstreit was asked about the prospects of teams taking the fall this season.  According to the ESPN television personality, he would be “shocked” if it happened.

“I’ll be shocked if we have NFL football this fall, if we have college football. I’ll be so surprised if that happens,” Herbstreit stated, by way of TMZ.com.

“Just because from what I understand, people that I listen to, you’re 12 to 18 months from a [coronavirus] vaccine. I don’t know how you let these guys go into locker rooms and let stadiums be filled up and how you can play ball. I just don’t know how you can do it with the optics of it.”

Because of the cancellation of March Madness, schools saw their revenue distribution from the NCAA drastically diminished.  That is expected to take a heavy toll on non-FBS schools.  If the college football season were to be canceled?  That would severely impact FBS schools, especially those in the Group of Five.

College Football Coronavirus Quarantine: On this day in CFT history

college football
Getty Images
2 Comments

The sports world, including college football, has essentially screeched to a halt as countries around the world battle the coronavirus pandemic. As such, there’s a dearth of college football news as spring practices have all but been canceled at every level of the sport. And there’s even some concern that the health issue could have an impact on the 2020 college football campaign.

In that vein, we thought it might be fun to go back through the CollegeFootballTalk archives and take a peek at what transpired in the sport on this date.

So, without further ado — ok, one further ado — here’s what happened in college football on March 24, by way of our team of CFT writers both past and present.

(P.S.: If any of our readers have ideas on posts they’d like to read during this hiatus, leave your suggestions in the comments section.  Mailbag, maybe?)

2019

THE HEADLINE: Georgia Tech DT Brandon Adams dies
THE SYNOPSIS: Just 21 years old, the defensive lineman died after he collapsed while practicing “step dancing” with friends, hitting his head on the pavement as he fell backwards. It was subsequently reported that “after going into convulsions, he began to foam at the mouth.”

THE HEADLINE: Georgia early enrollee arrested on disorderly conduct charge
THE SYNOPSIS: Tyrique Stevenson was a five-star member of Georgia’s 2019 recruiting class who was the third Bulldog player arrested in a month. As a true freshman, the defensive back played in all 14 games and was the team’s co-winner as Defensive Newcomer of the Year.

2018

THE HEADLINE: In addition to Notre Dame series, Alabama reportedly working on home-and-home with Texas, too
THE SYNOPSIS: Earlier in the day, it was reported that an Alabama-Notre Dame home-and-home was potentially in the works. One month later, that series was confirmed. Two months later, the Alabama-Texas home-and-home was officially announced.

2016

THE HEADLINE: Kentucky signee stabbed six times in weekend incident
THE SYNOPSIS: Jordan Bonner, at home visiting his infant son in a Cleveland (OH) suburb, was stabbed six times in the chest, abdomen and back by an individual who was subsequently arrested and charged with aggravated assault. The charges were eventually dropped as both individuals claimed self-defense. The linebacker recovered from his injuries and went on to play in 11 games as a true freshman.

THE HEADLINE: Nick Saban named one of Fortune’s ‘World’s Greatest Leaders’
THE SYNOPSIS: The Alabama head coach came in at No. 11 on the 50-person list, ahead of the likes of U2 frontman and philanthropist Bono (No. 14), Blackrock CEO Larry Fink (No. 21), Girl Scouts CEO Anna Maria Chavez (No. 24), Argentine president Maurizio Macri  (No. 26), the first women to graduate from Ranger School (No. 34), the heads of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (No. 41) and Canadian prime minister Justin Trudeau (No. 48).

2015

THE HEADLINE: Surprise! The NCAA went out of bounds on Reggie Bush investigation
THE SYNOPSIS: How ’bout we pick that NCAA scab one more time, Trojan Nation? Not much else to do.

2013

THE HEADLINE: Marshawn Lynch scores TD in Cal spring game
THE SYNOPSIS: A Seattle Seahawks running back at the time, the Cal legend “scored” from 22 yards out as he scampered into the end zone untouched. “We told the guys if anybody tackled him, it was going to be a $25 million fine,” then-head coach Sonny Dykes said at the time. “I didn’t want to be getting a call from Pete (Carroll, Lynch’s NFL coach).

2012

THE HEADLINE: Texas A&M AD on Big 12: ‘I regret that it is coming to an end’
THE SYNOPSIS: A&M’s athletic director at the time, Bill Byrne, may have “regretted” the Aggies’ move to the SEC at the time, but the school’s bank account sure wasn’t. And still isn’t.

2011

THE HEADLINE: Air Force pilots in Ohio State-Iowa flyover flap punished
THE SYNOPSIS: Four Air Force pilots in T-38 fighter jets buzzed Kinnick Stadium in a planned flyover following the playing of the national anthem for the Ohio State-Iowa game Nov. 20 the year before. The only problem? Per regulations, the jets were supposed to be at least 1,000 feet above ground level as they flew over the stadium. As it turns out, they weren’t even close to hitting that mark.

2010

THE HEADLINE: Black recruits urged to avoid Gamecocks
THE SYNOPSIS: Members of the black community in the Palmetto State — including legislators — urged football recruits to stay away from the University of South Carolina. Why? Because the school’s board of trustees was about to lose its lone African-American member.

2009

THE HEADLINE: PAC-10 HIRES HEAD OF WOMEN’S TENNIS TOUR AS COMMISH
THE SYNOPSIS: Larry Scott officially replaced Tom Hansen as the commissioner of the Conference Formerly Known as the Pac-10 on this date. To the bewilderment and/or angst of some, Scott’s remains in his post 11 years later. How much longer his tenure lasts, though, is to be determined.

(*Yes, back in the day, we used to scream out our headlines at our readers in all-caps. The move to NBC a couple of months later ended that practice.)

SEC athletic director expects conference distribution to drop $3 million per school

LSU Super Bowl
Getty Images
1 Comment

The SEC tag line of ‘It just means more’ isn’t quite ringing true in the wake of the growing coronavirus pandemic.

In fact, it could be a lot less for all 14 schools in the league. According to the Arkansas Democrat Gazette, Razorbacks athletic director Hunter Yurachek told school trustees recently that he is expecting between $2 and $3 million less in conference distributions this year.

“So we’re looking at deficit as we close out this fiscal year,” Yurachek said. “It would be hard not to have a deficit.”

The Southeastern Conference has, like most of their NCAA peers, canceled spring sports in recent days as a response to the COVID-19 outbreak. While there is a slim hope that spring football practices could be held at some point, that is obviously not a money maker for the league like its axed men’s basketball tournament would have been. On top of this, the NCAA canceled all championships for the rest of the 2019-20 academic year to further reduce the amount collected by the league office in Birmingham.

Though Yurachek notes that travel costs UA won’t have to pay will help balance things out like ticket refunds, the amount is unlikely to help save the Hogs from hitting red in their budget.

Given those estimates in the drop of distributions, the SEC could be facing as much as $42 million in lost revenue in 2020 as a result of the cancelations. The league handed out roughly $44.6 million per school in their last cycle.