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LSU TE Jamal Pettigrew opts to enter the transfer portal

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For the third time in a little over a month, the transfer portal has taken a bite out of the LSU football roster.

In late June, safety Eric Monroe entered the NCAA transfer database.  A week later, linebacker Marcel Brooks did the same.  Additionally, quarterback Peter Parrish is no longer a part of the LSU football team.

Saturday, the mini-wave of attrition continued as tight end Jamal Pettigrew is now listed in Ye Olde Transfer Portal. Matt Zenitz of al.com first reported the move, which was subsequently confirmed by 247Sports.com.

Now, for what’s seemingly becoming a daily disclaimer when it comes to transfers.

As we’ve stated myriad times in the past, a player can remove his name from the portal and remain at the same school. At this point, though, other programs are permitted to contact a player without receiving permission from his current football program.

NCAA bylaws also permit schools to pull a portal entrant’s scholarship at the end of the semester in which he entered it.

As a graduate transfer, Pettigrew would be eligible to play immediately at another FBS school.  The 2020 season would serve as his final year of eligibility.

Pettigrew was a four-star member of the LSU football Class of 2016.  The New Orleans native was rated as the No. 16 prospect regardless of position in the state of Louisiana.  He was also the No. 9 tight end in the country on the 247Sports.com composite.

Pettigrew took a redshirt as a true freshman, then missed the entire 2018 season because of a torn ACL.

In 2017 and 2019, Pettigrew combined to appear in 15 games.  The tight end started two of those contests, with both coming in 2017.  He will finish his time in Baton Rouge with a pair of receptions for 17 yards.

SEC joins Big Ten, Pac-12 in going with a 10-game, conference-only football schedule for 2020

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The SEC has decided on the direction its football season will take.  If there is a college football season, that is.

Following a meeting of the league’s presidents and chancellors, the SEC announced Thursday that it will go with a 10-game, conference-only schedule for the 2020 college football season.  Originally scheduled to start the weekend of Sept. 5, the SEC has now pushed back the season’s kick-off back to Sept. 26.  Additionally, the conference championship game will be played Dec. 19.

John Talty of al.com was the first to report the development.  In confirming the report, the SEC added that each team will have two bye weekends during the regular season: one mid-season (different dates for different schools) as well as a league-wide bye the weekend of Dec. 12.  That, of course, is the weekend prior to the league title game.

“This new plan for a football schedule is consistent with the educational goals of our universities to allow for the safe and orderly return to campus of their student populations and to provide a healthy learning environment during these unique circumstances presented by the COVID-19 virus,” commissioner Greg Sankey said in a statement. “This new schedule supports the safety measures that are being taken by each of our institutions to ensure the health of our campus communities.”

It had been expected that the SEC would follow the ACC’s lead and add a plus-one to the schedule, a non-conference matchup that was previously on the schedule.  Instead, the move means games such as LSU-Texas, South Carolina-Clemson, Florida-Florida State and Georgia-Georgia Tech are officially off the schedule for the 2020 season.

The 14-member SEC will play its six division rivals as well as the regularly-scheduled pair of crossover games.  The additional crossover games that will fill out the 10-game conference slate will be announced at a later date.

The Big Ten and Pac-12 as previously announced that those leagues would be going to a conference-only schedule.  That leaves the Big 12 as the only Power Five to have not signaled its scheduling intentions.

Below are all of the non-conference games for each SEC school that will be canceled:

  • Alabama — USC, Georgia State, Kent State, UT-Martin
  • Arkansas — Nevada, Notre Dame, Charleston Southern, Louisiana-Monroe
  • Auburn — Alcorn State, North Carolina, Southern Miss, UMass
  • Florida — Eastern Washington, South Alabama, New Mexico State, Florida State
  • Georgia — Virginia, East Tennessee State, Louisiana-Monroe, Georgia Tech
  • Kentucky — Eastern Michigan, Kent State, Eastern Illinois, Louisville
  • LSU — UTSA, Texas, Rice, Nicholls State
  • Mississippi State — New Mexico, NC State, Tulane, Alabama A&M
  • Missouri — Central Arkansas, Eastern Michigan, BYU, Louisiana
  • Ole Miss — Baylor, Southeast Missouri State, UConn, Georgia Southern
  • South Carolina — Coastal Carolina, East Carolina, Wofford, Clemson
  • Tennessee — Charlotte, Oklahoma, Furman, Troy
  • Texas A&M — Abiline Christian, North Texas, Colorado, Fresno State
  • Vanderbilt — Mercer, Kansas State, Colorado State, Louisiana Tech

College Football amidst Coronavirus Pandemic: On this day in CFT history, including Texas A&M got down & dirty — and crude & sexist — at football clinic for women

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The sports world, including college football, had essentially screeched to a halt in the spring as countries around the world battled the coronavirus pandemic. As such, there was a dearth of college football news as the sport went into a COVID-induced hibernation.  Slowly, though, the game is coming back to life.  Hopefully.

That being said, we thought it might be fun to go back through the CollegeFootballTalk archives that stretch back to 2009 and take a peek at what transpired in the sport on this date.

So, without further ado — ok, one further ado — here’s what happened in college football on July 29, by way of our team of CFT writers both past and present.

(P.S.: If any of our readers have ideas on posts they’d like to read during this college football down-time, leave your suggestions in the comments section.  Mailbag, maybe?)

2019

THE HEADLINE: Roll Bucky: Alabama, Wisconsin announce home-and-home for 2024-25
THE SYNOPSIS: The Big Ten and SEC schools have met just twice previously.  The first matchup, Badgers win, came way back in 1928.  The most recent one, a Crimson Tide win, opened the 2015 season.  The 2024 game will mark Alabama’s first game inside a Big Ten stadium since a 27-11 win at Penn State in 2011.

2018

THE HEADLINE: Nick Saban’s wish for SEC scheduling has support from LSU Deputy AD
THE SYNOPSIS: Saban’s scheduling wish?  For Power Fives to play nothing but other Power Fives.

2017

THE HEADLINE: Lane Kiffin feels for White House Chief of Staff booted by Donald Trump
THE SYNOPSIS: Reince Priebus was given the boot off of Air Force One.  Kiffin was pulled off the bus and fired as USC’s head coach in the parking area of a private terminal at Los Angeles International Airport in September of 2013.

2016

THE HEADLINE: Texas A&M got down & dirty — and crude & sexist — at football clinic for women
THE SYNOPSIS: Among the pass-blocking do’s? “Spread them again.” “Get erect.” “Stay erect.” “Bang him hard.” Four years later, it’s still amazing that someone green-lit this presentation.

2015

THE HEADLINE: Mike Leach continues stumping for 64-team playoff
THE SYNOPSIS: Personally, I’d settle for eight.  But, would still push for 16.

2014

THE HEADLINE: Urban Meyer’s Buckeyes have national title expectations
THE SYNOPSIS: Six months later, Ohio State beat Oregon to claim the first-ever College Football Playoff championship.

2010

THE HEADLINE: Texas A&M says Big 12 best show them the money
THE SYNOPSIS: In the end, it was the SEC that ended up showing the Aggies the money.  For the 2019 fiscal year, A&M received $45.3 million from the SEC.  Individual Big 12 members, meanwhile, were paid in the neighborhood of $40 million.

2009

THE HEADLINE: Poll names Bear Bryant #3 all-time coach in sports
THE SYNOPSIS: The only coaches ahead of the Alabama legend? UCLA’s John Wooden and Green Bay’s Vince Lombardi.

Four-star 2021 nephew of Pitt legend Aaron Donald commits to Panthers

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If this commit puts in half the collegiate career Aaron Donald did, Pitt would be ecstatic.  To say the least.

A senior at Central Catholic High School in Pittsburgh, Elliot Donald is a four-star 2021 prospect.  Late this past week, the defensive lineman opted to stay close to home as Donald announced on Twitter that he has committed to the Pitt Panthers.

And, yes, Donald is related to Aaron Donald.  Specifically, the former Pitt All-American is the recruit’s uncle.

The younger Donald is rated as the No. 9 defensive tackle in the country.  He’s also the No. 6 prospect in the state of Pennsylvania regardless of position.  Of the 17 that currently make up Pitt’s class, Donald is the highest-rated 2021 commit for the Panthers thus far.

Donald opted for Pitt from a Top Eight that included LSU, Michigan, Notre Dame, Ohio State, Penn State, Texas A&M and West Virginia.

As for Donald’s uncle?  I think people tend to forget just how dominating Donald was at the collegiate level.  In his last three seasons, Donald was credited with 63 tackles for loss (63!!!).  A two-time unanimous All-American, Donald won Outland, Lombardi, Bednarik and Nagurski Awards in the same season.  Last year, he was a unanimous selection on CFT‘s All-Decade team.

At the NFL level, Donald has been just as dominant.  In six seasons with the Los Angeles (nee St. Louis) Rams, Donald has been named first-team All-Pro the past five years.  In 2017 and 2018, he was the NFL Defensive Player of the Year.

College Football in Coronavirus Quarantine: On this day in CFT history, including a 2018 raise that made then-Iowa strength coach Chris Doyle higher-paid than nearly three dozen FBS head coaches

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The sports world, including college football, had essentially screeched to a halt in the spring as countries around the world battled the coronavirus pandemic. As such, there was a dearth of college football news as the sport went into a COVID-induced hibernation.  Slowly, though, the game is coming back to life.  Hopefully.

That being said, we thought it might be fun to go back through the CollegeFootballTalk archives that stretch back to 2009 and take a peek at what transpired in the sport on this date.

So, without further ado — ok, one further ado — here’s what happened in college football on July 25, by way of our team of CFT writers both past and present.

(P.S.: If any of our readers have ideas on posts they’d like to read during this college football down-time, leave your suggestions in the comments section.  Mailbag, maybe?)

2019

THE HEADLINE: LSU will officially sell alcohol in Tiger Stadium this season
THE SYNOPSIS: By the end of the 2019 campaign — and during it — Tiger fans had plenty of reasons to drink in celebration.

2018

THE HEADLINE: Nick Saban: Jalen Hurts told Alabama coach ‘I am going to be here’
THE SYNOPSIS: Six months later, the quarterback transferred to Oklahoma.

2018

THE HEADLINE: Iowa’s strength coach nets raise, makes him higher paid than nearly three dozen FBS head coaches
THE SYNOPSIS: Amidst controversy, Chris Doyle lost his job as the Iowa strength & conditioning coach last month.

2017

THE HEADLINE: Urban Meyer: Greg Schiano ‘will be head coach’ again after turning down two ‘significant’ jobs this offseason
THE SYNOPSIS: Meyer proved prescient as, two years later, Schiano returned as the head coach at Rutgers.

2016

THE HEADLINE: Florida’s Geoff Collins could become next million-dollar coordinator
THE SYNOPSIS: At the time, nine assistants made seven figures.  Three years later, per the USA Today coaches salary database, that number had nearly tripled to 24.

2015

THE HEADLINE: Three years after the NCAA hammer, Penn State still alive and well
THE SYNOPSIS: Penn State in 2012 was hit with sanctions that were just this side of SMU’s death penalty.  In the eight seasons since, they have not won fewer than seven games.  The past four seasons, the Nittany Lions have won 10-plus games in three of them.

2014

THE HEADLINE: Oklahoma’s 5-star RB Joe Mixon “involved in serious altercation”
THE SYNOPSIS: To say it was serious would be an understatement.

2013

THE HEADLINE: Florida removes Aaron Hernandez’s All-American brick from stadium
THE SYNOPSIS: The move came amidst the former Gator standout being charged in the murder of Odin Lloyd.

2013

THE HEADLINE: After three-year suspension, Georgia OL reinstated by NCAA
THE SYNOPSIS: Kolton Houston‘s years-long odyssey began when he took a banned substance, 19-Norandrosterone, to aid in the healing of a shoulder injury while he was in high school in 2009.  For some inexplicable reason, the drug continued to show up in testing and Houston continued to serve out a suspension.