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College Football amidst Coronavirus Pandemic: On this day in CFT history, including Notre Dame coaching legend Ara Parseghian dies at 94

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The sports world, including college football, had essentially screeched to a halt in the spring as countries around the world battled the coronavirus pandemic. As such, there was a dearth of college football news as the sport went into a COVID-induced hibernation.  Slowly, though, the game is coming back to life.  Hopefully.

That being said, we thought it might be fun to go back through the CollegeFootballTalk archives that stretch back to 2009 and take a peek at what transpired in the sport on this date.

So, without further ado — ok, one further ado — here’s what happened in college football on August 2, by way of our team of CFT writers both past and present.

(P.S.: If any of our readers have ideas on posts they’d like to read during this college football down-time, leave your suggestions in the comments section.  Mailbag, maybe?)

2019

THE HEADLINE: Iowa strength coach Chris Doyle remains highest-paid in the country with pay bump to $800K
THE SYNOPSIS: Less than a year later, amidst controversy, Doyle and the Hawkeyes “parted ways.”

2018

THE HEADLINE: Four-star Nebraska signee Maurice Washington cleared academically
THE SYNOPSIS: If only this was the end of his off-field journey.  Yeah, not even close.

2017

THE HEADLINE: Notre Dame mourns the passing of Ara Parseghian
THE SYNOPSIS: In 11 seasons with Parseghian as head coach, the Fighting Irish went 95-17-4 and won two national championships, 1966 and 1973.  The College Football Hall of Famer was 94 at the time of his passing.

2016

THE HEADLINE: Ohio State sits atop AP’s Top 100 poll of all-time college football programs
THE SYNOPSIS: The Associated Press put together a list that was based on total poll appearances, number of times ranked No. 1 and bonuses for AP national championships.  The Top Five, outside of OSU? Oklahoma, Notre Dame, Alabama and USC at Nos. 2-5.

2014

THE HEADLINE: Big House sets U.S. soccer attendance mark
THE SYNOPSIS: For some reason, this post eclipsed the century mark in the comments section.  And, if I remember correctly, it would’ve been twice the century mark if not for the myriad comments I had to delete.

2014

THE HEADLINE: Nebraska still has 1,000 student tickets for a lousy home schedule
THE SYNOPSIS: Of course, all of those tickets were ultimately gobbled up.  The Cornhuskers currently hold the record for the longest sellout streak in college football history at 375.  That streak dates all the way back to 1962.  NU, though, might have to play loose with numbers if that streak is to continue amidst the pandemic.

2011

THE HEADLINE: Applebee’s serves as neighborhood bar and battle ground for UT-OU knife fight
THE SYNOPSIS: The Red River Shootout’s slogan?  “Fightin’ Good in the Neighborhood.”

2010

THE HEADLINE: Vandy drops ‘interim’ from HC Robbie Caldwell’s title
THE SYNOPSIS: Cladwell earned just for introducing “turkey inseminating crew” into the college football lexicon.

Report: 2020 Michigan-Ohio State game will ‘probably’ be moved to Sept. or Oct.

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If the Big Ten plays football this fall — whispers suggest the conference is bracing members for no season — the annual Michigan-Ohio State could very well have a decidedly different feel to it.  Temperature-wise in particular.

Every year for nearly eight decades, you could set your watch to the Michigan-Ohio State rivalry grudge match. When The Game was on, you knew it was November and the last game of the regular season.  However, because of the coronavirus pandemic, Bill Rabinowitz of Columbus Dispatch is reporting that this year’s matchup will probably be played earlier in the season “as a hedge against the COVID-19 pandemic causing a cancellation in late November.”

From the Dispatch:

If the game is scheduled in September or October and the coronavirus situation forces a postponement, it could then played at a later date.

The source stressed that no final decisions about scheduling have been made, and that the situation is fluid, but that moving the game is the most likely scenario at this point.

If that happens, it is unlikely that Ohio State would play Michigan in the season opener.

The last time Michigan and Ohio State didn’t end the regular season against one another?  Way back in 1942.

July 9, the Big Ten announced that it will be going to a conference-only schedule for the 2020 college football season.  It’s expected that the conference will announce its schedule at some point in early August.

In a letter sent to membership Thursday, elevenwarriors.com reported, the conference stressed that, if it feels fall sports, including football, can’t be safely contested, they could still be canceled.

“If we determine as a Conference that it is not prudent to compete in the fall of 2020, we will not do so, much like our decision in March 2020 to cancel the Men’s Basketball Tournament in Indianapolis,” the letter states. “Our final decision will be rooted in guidance from medical experts and in consultation with institutional leadership, student-athletes, coaches and appropriate federal, state, and local authorities.”

College Football amidst Coronavirus Pandemic: On this day in CFT history, including a reputed gambler (Tay Bang!) reportedly giving Florida Gator football players discounts on rental cars

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The sports world, including college football, had essentially screeched to a halt in the spring as countries around the world battled the coronavirus pandemic. As such, there was a dearth of college football news as the sport went into a COVID-induced hibernation.  Slowly, though, the game is coming back to life.  Hopefully.

That being said, we thought it might be fun to go back through the CollegeFootballTalk archives that stretch back to 2009 and take a peek at what transpired in the sport on this date.

So, without further ado — ok, one further ado — here’s what happened in college football on July 31, by way of our team of CFT writers both past and present.

(P.S.: If any of our readers have ideas on posts they’d like to read during this college football down-time, leave your suggestions in the comments section.  Mailbag, maybe?)

2018

THE HEADLINE: Reputed gambler reportedly gave Florida Gator football players discounts on rental cars
THE SYNOPSIS: This bizarre situation involved the gambler, nicknamed “Tay Bang,” who was also an employee at Enterprise Rent-A-Car.  No NCAA issues arose from the allegations.

2017

THE HEADLINE: UCF K Donald De La Haye leaves team after refusing to demonetize YouTube channel
THE SYNOPSIS: Kudos, NCAA!  You continue to rock!!! In the coming months, what De La Haye should’ve been allowed to then will be permissible.

2016

THE HEADLINE: BAC for arrested Alabama OL Alphonse Taylor was a Blutarsky
THE SYNOPSIS: The reason this headline is included? It allows me to post this classic scene, of course.

Fat, drunk and stupid is no way to go through life, son.” “Mr. Blutarsky.  Zero.  Point.  Zero.

2015

THE HEADLINE: New Big Ten scheduling mandates Power 5 opponents, no FCS foes
THE SYNOPSIS: The move was made to strengthen the conference’s strength of schedule when it came to the College Football Playoff.  The Power Five requirement brought the B1G in-line with the ACC and SEC.

2015

THE HEADLINE: No name games for Jim Harbaugh. Ohio State is “Ohio State” for Michigan coach
THE SYNOPSIS: This came on the heels of Brady Hoke annoyingly referring to its rival as “Ohio.” He is, though, the last Wolverines head coach to beat the Buckeyes. So he’s got that going for him.  Which is nice.

2014

THE HEADLINE: Kirk Ferentz says 10-game conference schedules are coming
THE SYNOPSIS: Nine games?  Yep.  10 games? Nope.  Not yet.  And likely never.

2012

THE HEADLINE: As expected, Silas Redd transferring to USC
THE SYNOPSIS: The running back was the first big-name player to flee the Nittany Lions in the wake of historic NCAA sanctions.

2009

THE HEADLINE: 30-day suspension for slurring Hawaii coach
THE SYNOPSIS: Greg McMackin drew a suspension for directing a homosexual slur at a Notre Dame bowl dance.  Yes, you read that correctly.

Former player alleges in lawsuit Bo Schembechler knew of sexual abuse allegations at Michigan

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Dozens of more victims who claim they were molested by a University of Michigan doctor filed a lawsuit against the school Thursday, including a former football player who said he told legendary coach Bo Schembechler about the abuse in the early 1980s.

It’s the first time that a victim has publicly said Bo Schembechler was aware of allegations against the late Dr. Robert Anderson, who worked at Michigan, especially with athletes, from the mid-1960s through 2003.

The university believes Anderson assaulted male athletes during routine physicals and injury exams. It has hired a law firm to investigate nearly 400 complaints so far while expressing a willingness to ultimately compensate victims.

“The shame doesn’t belong with survivors,” attorney Steve Estey said. “It belongs with the University of Michigan. And we intend to put the shame back where it belongs, with U-M for failing to protect its students and athletes.”

The latest lawsuit lists 53 victims.

A football player said he told Schembechler in 1982 and 1983 that he was sexually abused by Anderson during appointments for migraine headaches. He said the coach told him to immediately report it to athletic director Don Canham.

Schembechler was “visibly angry,” the man told reporters Thursday, adding that he went to Canham, who “did nothing.”

The man said he holds no grudge against Schembechler, who died in 2006, or his staff. The Associated Press doesn’t typically identify victims of sexual assault.

“I feel horrible for coach Schembechler. I will defend that man until my dying day,” the man said. “If they could have been able to come forward and stop this and throw Canham literally or figuratively against the wall and say, `This has to end,’ they would have.

“Times were totally different where one man was in charge. … Protecting the institution was what Don was all about. Protecting his good name was what Don was all about. Protecting his ego was what Don Canham was all about,” he said.

Other athletes have accused Canham of knowing about Anderson’s abuse. Canham died in 2005. Schembechler was coach from 1969-89.

“At the University of Michigan, we condemn all sexual misconduct,” spokeswoman Kim Broekhuizen said in response to the latest lawsuit. “This type of conduct is reprehensible – and whether it takes place now or took place in the past, it is unacceptable.”

College Football in Coronavirus Quarantine: On this day in CFT history, including Michigan AD proclaiming Brady Hoke wasn’t on the hot seat less than five months before Hoke was fired

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1 Comment

The sports world, including college football, had essentially screeched to a halt in the spring as countries around the world battled the coronavirus pandemic. As such, there was a dearth of college football news as the sport went into a COVID-induced hibernation.  Slowly, though, the game is coming back to life.  Hopefully.

That being said, we thought it might be fun to go back through the CollegeFootballTalk archives that stretch back to 2009 and take a peek at what transpired in the sport on this date.

So, without further ado — ok, one further ado — here’s what happened in college football on July 28, by way of our team of CFT writers both past and present.

(P.S.: If any of our readers have ideas on posts they’d like to read during this college football down-time, leave your suggestions in the comments section.  Mailbag, maybe?)

2019

THE HEADLINE: No longer enrolled at Alabama, could Eyabi Anoma be in play for Maryland?
THE SYNOPSIS: In the end, the answer was no.  The five-star 2018 linebacker ultimately transferred to Houston.  In February of this year, however, Anoma was dismissed by UH for violating unspecified team rules. Last month, he announced he was transferring to FCS Tennessee-Martin.

2017

THE HEADLINE: Coastal Carolina head coach Joe Moglia will miss 2017 season to recover from health issues
THE SYNOPSIS: In January of 2019, Moglia stepped down as head coach.  He still, though, maintains “executive authority” over the Chanticleers football program.

2016

THE HEADLINE: Ex-Alabama LB Christian Bell announces transfer to Wisconsin
THE SYNOPSIS: Nearly four years later, Bell moved on from Wisconsin to Illinois.

2015

THE HEADLINE: Frank Beamer wants Hokies to stay in-house for a successor
THE SYNOPSIS: That would’ve likely meant long-time defensive coordinator Bud Foster.  Or even Beamer’s then-assistant — and son  — Shane Beamer.  In the end, it was Justin Fuente who replaced Beamer after he retired following the 2015 season.   Foster stayed on for another four seasons before his own retirement.  Shane Beamer, meanwhile, joined the Georgia coaching staff for the 2016 season.

2014

THE HEADLINE: Michigan AD says Brady Hoke isn’t on hot seat
THE SYNOPSIS: Hoke was fired less than five months later.  In four seasons with the Wolverines, Hoke went 31-20 overall and 18-14 in Big Ten play.  After winning 11 games his first season in Ann Arbor, Hoke won nine, seven and five games the last three.  In January, he was named as the head coach at San Diego State.  For the second time.

2010

THE HEADLINE: 1986 Miami Hurricanes top most-hated list
THE SYNOPSIS: This is for all of sports.  Not just college football, mind you.  Another Miami squad, the 1990 version, came in at No. 11 of the SI.com Top 25.  Others from college football included USC’s 2005 team (15th) and Notre Dame’s 1993 squad (17th).

2009

THE HEADLINE: Another ‘Nippany’ Lion popped for DUI
THE SYNOPSIS: Get it?  See what we did there?