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Big Ten commish, Ohio State AD decidedly pessimistic on B1G having a 2020 college football season

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The Big Ten toppled the first significant domino earlier in the day.  Now, two of the most powerful men in the conference are expounding on the development.  And, if you’re a fan of the sport, you might want to close your eyes when reading the next few paragraphs.  Or take several shots of an adult beverage before proceeding.

Thursday afternoon, the Big Ten confirmed reports that it will be going with a conference-only football schedule for the 2020 season.  All other fall sports are impacted in the same way.

In television appearances following the announcement, the B1G’s commissioner didn’t put a positive spin on football’s immediate future.

“One thing we have to realize is that this is not a fait accompli that we’re going to have sports in the fall,” Kevin Warren flatly stated. “We may not have sports in the fall, we may not have a college football season in the Big Ten. …

“We made a vow early on that, first and foremost, we would put the health, the safety and the wellness of our student-athletes at the center of all of our decisions.

Gene Smith was equally pessimistic.

“I can’t reiterate enough the fact that we might not play,” the Ohio State athletic director said in discussing football in 2020. “We just might not, and I think people need to understand that.”

It’s expected that other Power Five conferences will follow the lead of the Big Ten.  In the coming days, both the ACC and Pac-12 will most likely announce a conference-only football schedule.  The lone exception will be the ACC including Notre Dame, which already has six games against the conference on its 2020 slate, in any revamped schedule.

The Big 12 and SEC are widely expected to kick the scheduling can down the road a bit longer, perhaps as late as the end of July.  In the end, however, both of those Power Fives are likely to come to the same scheduling conclusion.

Big Ten confirms it will go with a conference-only football schedule in 2020

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The first big domino, by way of the Big Ten, has unofficially fallen.  Check that: massive domino.

When the Ivy League announced Wednesday that all fall sports, including football, had been postponed until at last the end of the fall semester, it felt like the optimism for a normal 2020 schedule was waning.  The most noteworthy program thus far, Ohio State, halting workouts because of a COVID-19 spike just added to the pessimism.

Thursday afternoon, OSU’s league, the Big Ten, is confirmed reports that it will be going with a conference-only football schedule for the 2020 season.

“By limiting competition to other Big Ten institutions, the Conference will have the greatest flexibility to adjust its own operations throughout the season and make quick decisions in real-time based on the most current evolving medical advice and the fluid nature of the pandemic,” the league stated.

“This decision was made following many thoughtful conversations over several months between the Big Ten Council of Presidents and Chancellors, Directors of Athletics, Conference Office staff, and medical experts including the Big Ten Task Force for Emerging Infectious Diseases and the Big Ten Sports Medicine Committee.”

At this point, it’s unclear what impact this move would have on the College Football Playoffs and bowl games.

Suffice to say, this edict, which will more than likely be followed by other Power Five conferences, will have a significant effect on the schedule.  Below are just some of the Power Five games that will be impacted by the Big Ten nixing non-conference games:

  • Iowa-Iowa State
  • Maryland-West Virginia
  • Michigan-Washington
  • Michigan State-Miami
  • Ohio State-Oregon
  • Penn State-Virginia Tech
  • Purdue-Boston College
  • Rutgers-Syracuse
  • Wisconsin-Notre Dame (at Lambeau Field)

BYU, meanwhile, has two games scheduled against B1G opponents, at Michigan State and at Minnesota.

Below are the non-conference schedules for each of the schools in the Big Ten conference:

ILLINOIS
09/04 – Illinois State
09/12 – UConn
09/19 – Bowling Green

INDIANA
09/12 – WKU
09/19 – Ball State
09/26 – at UConn

IOWA
09/05 – Northern Iowa
09/12 – Iowa State
09/26 – Northern Illinois

MARYLAND
09/05 – Towson
09/12 – Northern Illinois
09/19 – at West Virginia

MICHIGAN
09/05 – at Washington
09/12 – Ball State
09/19 – Arkansas State

MICHIGAN STATE
09/12 – at BYU
09/19 – Toledo
09/26 – Miami (FL)

MINNESOTA
09/03 – Florida Atlantic
09/12 – Tennessee Tech
09/26 – BYU

NEBRASKA
09/12 – Central Michigan
09/19 – South Dakota State
09/26 – Cincinnati

NORTHWESTERN
09/12 – Tulane
09/19 – Central Michigan
11/14 – Morgan State

OHIO STATE
09/05 – Bowling Green
09/12 – at Oregon
09/19 – Buffalo

PENN STATE
09/05 – Kent State
09/12 – at Virginia Tech
09/19 – San Jose State

PURDUE
09/12 – Memphis
09/19 – Air Force
09/26 – at Boston College

RUTGERS
09/05 – Monmouth
09/12 – Syracuse
09/19 – at Temple

WISCONSIN
09/12 – Southern Illinois
09/19 – Appalachian State
10/03 – vs Notre Dame (in Green Bay, WI)

College Football in Coronavirus Quarantine: On this day in CFT history, including Urban Meyer reminding us that he constantly thinks about the Michigan rivalry

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The sports world, including college football, has essentially screeched to a halt as countries around the world battle the coronavirus pandemic. As such, there’s a dearth of college football news as spring practices have all but been canceled at every level of the sport. And there’s even some concern that the health issue could have an impact on the 2020 college football campaign.

In that vein, we thought it might be fun to go back through the CollegeFootballTalk archives that stretch back to 2009 and take a peek at what transpired in the sport on this date.

So, without further ado — ok, one further ado — here’s what happened in college football on June 21, by way of our team of CFT writers both past and present.

(P.S.: If any of our readers have ideas on posts they’d like to read during this college football hiatus, leave your suggestions in the comments section.  Mailbag, maybe?)

2019

THE HEADLINE: Father of LSU football player reportedly received $180K in stolen money from booster
THE SYNOPSIS: That booster was sentenced to 33 months in prison last October.  Thus far, there have no NCAA issues arising from this for LSU.

2018

THE HEADLINE: Big Ten revenue distribution hits $51 million
THE SYNOPSIS: And some fans continue to bitch about players profiting off their own names/images/likenesses.

2015

THE HEADLINE: Urban Meyer constantly thinking about Michigan rivalry
THE SYNOPSIS: During his time at Ohio State, Meyer went 8-1 against That Team Up North.  1-1 as a graduate assistant from 1986-87.  7-0 as head coach from 2012-18.

2012

THE HEADLINE: Harvey Updyke’s trial delayed… again
THE SYNOPSIS: Anybody miss the days of almost daily Updyke updates?  Yeah, neither do I.

2011

THE HEADLINE: North Carolina Notice of Allegations targets John Blake, Jennifer Wiley
THE SYNOPSIS: This was part of the path that led to Butch Davisdismissal as head coachA month before the season kicked off.

2011

THE HEADLINE: BMV probe finds no wrongdoing in vehicle purchases by OSU players
THE SYNOPSIS: Hoo-boy.  Non-Ohio State fans were in a tizzy and/or uproar over this one.

2010

THE HEADLINE:
THE SYNOPSIS:

College Football in Coronavirus Quarantine: On this day in CFT history, including Mark Emmert suggesting six years ago that paying players would doom college sports

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The sports world, including college football, has essentially screeched to a halt as countries around the world battle the coronavirus pandemic. As such, there’s a dearth of college football news as spring practices have all but been canceled at every level of the sport. And there’s even some concern that the health issue could have an impact on the 2020 college football campaign.

In that vein, we thought it might be fun to go back through the CollegeFootballTalk archives that stretch back to 2009 and take a peek at what transpired in the sport on this date.

So, without further ado — ok, one further ado — here’s what happened in college football on June 19, by way of our team of CFT writers both past and present.

(P.S.: If any of our readers have ideas on posts they’d like to read during this college football hiatus, leave your suggestions in the comments section.  Mailbag, maybe?)

2019

THE HEADLINE: Big Ten coaches on hot seat: Record revenues mean those big buyouts don’t mean quite as much
THE SYNOPSIS: Just two B1G programs will have different coaches in 2020.  Chris Ash was fired by Rutgers.  And Mark Dantoniostepped down” at Michigan State.

2018

THE HEADLINE: Lincoln Riley will (barely) make more than his starting QB in 2018
THE SYNOPSIS: The head coach made $4.8 million in guaranteed compensation. Kyler Murray, the ninth-overall pick of the 2019 MLB Draft, was paid a $4.7 million signing bonus.

2016

THE HEADLINE: Tennessee lands eight commitments in one day
THE SYNOPSIS: The 2017-18 seasons produced a combined nine wins.  Vols fans can only hope this year’s recruiting rush produces better on-field results.

2015

THE HEADLINE: Jim Harbaugh effect helping to turn around ticket sales at Michigan
THE SYNOPSIS: In five seasons under Harbaugh, the Wolverines have finished third or fourth in The Big Ten East four times.  U-M is also 0-5 vs. rival Ohio State.

2014

THE HEADLINE: Mark Emmert once again suggests paying players would doom college sports
THE SYNOPSIS: Six years later, players are about to earn money off their own name, image and likeness.  With the begrudging approval of the NCAA.

2013

THE HEADLINE: Johnny Manziel’s angry tweet was fueled by a… parking ticket?
THE SYNOPSIS: What do we always say?  Johnny Football gonna Johnny Football, y’all.

2010

THE HEADLINE: Dr. Lou: Notre Dame should join Big Ten
THE SYNOPSIS: A decade later, many observers align with  Holtz’s opinion.  Except for those whose opinions matter most.  Ya know, the ones who reside in South Bend.

2009

THE HEADLINE: Jim Harbaugh Steers Around the NFL Question
THE SYNOPSIS: On Jan. 7, 2011, Harbaugh officially left Stanford for the San Francisco 49ers.

NCAA Council formally approves six-week preseason model for football, which will begin July 13 for teams that start season Sept. 5

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The NCAA is proceeding with a significant step toward prepping for the 2020 college football season.

Earlier this month, it was confirmed that the NCAA Div. I Oversight Committee was crafting a plan that would shape the path college football programs would take to prepare for the upcoming season.  Last week, the NCAA announced that it has finalized its proposal for a preseason model for the sport.  However, the plan still needed the approval of the NCAA Division I Council.

Thursday, that expected thumbs-up came to fruition as the council has approved what will essentially be a six-week preseason for college football.  The NCAA writes that, “[a]ssuming a first game on Sept. 5, the model begins summer access activities July 13 and adds meetings and walk-throughs July 24.  Preseason practice begins Aug. 7.” Schools that open the seasoning Week 0 (Aug. 29), all of the dates would get seven days subtracted from them.  It’s unclear if teams whose first games are Sept. 3 will follow the Sept. 5 model or not.

The activities mentioned do not include the ongoing voluntary on-campus workouts.

As for the particulars?  The NCAA referred to its previous release as a guideline:

… student-athletes may be required to participate in up to eight hours of weight training, conditioning and film review per week (not more than two hours of film review per week) from July 13-23.

Then, from July 24 through Aug. 6, student-athletes may be required to participate in up to 20 hours of countable athletically related activities per week (not more than four hours per day) as follows:

— Up to eight hours per week for weight training and conditioning.
— Up to six hours per week for walk-throughs, which may include the use of a football.
— Up to six hours per week for meetings, which may include film review, team meetings, position meetings, one-on-one meetings, etc.
— During this 14-day period, student-athletes are required to get at least two days off.

The model does not make any adjustments to the legislated 29-day preseason practice period. In the previous example, the school’s preseason practice period would begin Aug. 7 with a five-day acclimatization period, followed by the opportunity for up to 25 on-field practices.