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College Football in Coronavirus Quarantine: On this day in CFT history, including Mack Brown in 2017 not ruling out a return to coaching ‘if the right situation came up’

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The sports world, including college football, has essentially screeched to a halt as countries around the world battle the coronavirus pandemic. As such, there’s a dearth of college football news as spring practices have all but been canceled at every level of the sport. And there’s even some concern that the health issue could have an impact on the 2020 college football campaign.

In that vein, we thought it might be fun to go back through the CollegeFootballTalk archives that stretch back to 2009 and take a peek at what transpired in the sport on this date.

So, without further ado — ok, one further ado — here’s what happened in college football on June 1, by way of our team of CFT writers both past and present.

(P.S.: If any of our readers have ideas on posts they’d like to read during this college football hiatus, leave your suggestions in the comments section.  Mailbag, maybe?)

2019

THE HEADLINE: Big 12 distributes record $38.8 million
THE SYNOPSIS: That’s per school.  And, this year, that number has dropped because of the coronavirus pandemic.

2018

THE HEADLINE: Despite first-round potential in MLB Draft, Lincoln Riley expects Kyler Murray to be Sooners QB
THE SYNOPSIS: Murray was indeed selected in the first round of the 2019 Major League Baseball Draft.  The ninth player selected, in fact.  Murray, though, remained true to the Sooners.  And claimed the Heisman Trophy later that year.

2017

THE HEADLINE: Bill Snyder confirms, defends decision to limit transferring WR’s options
THE SYNOPSIS: The legendary Kansas State head coach was usually the classiest guy in college football.  This wasn’t one of those times.

2017

THE HEADLINE: Mack Brown not ruling out a return to coaching ‘if the right situation came up’
THE SYNOPSIS: In November of 2018, Brown indeed returned.  To both coaching and North Carolina.  And he’s been killing it both on and off the field.

2015

THE HEADLINE: UAB football to be reinstated and return to C-USA play… eventually
THE SYNOPSIS: The program was shuttered the previous December.  It officially returned in 2017.   A year later, the Blazers won the Conference USA championship.  And claimed their first-ever bowl win.

2012

THE HEADLINE: SEC unanimously supports top-four playoff model
THE SYNOPSIS: Obviously, this was the model the College Football Playoff went with.  The SEC has won three (Alabama 2015, 2017; LSU 2019) of the CFP title games.  Clemson has won two, while Ohio State won the inaugural one.

2011

THE HEADLINE: Maize & blue t-shirt mocks Jim Tressel’s demise
THE SYNOPSIS: Michigan fans took great glee in the resignation of the Sweatervest. “Vest in peace,” the t-shirt read. On an unrelated note, Tressel went 9-1 vs. U-M.  All told, Ohio State has won 18 of the last 19 meetings in the rivalry.

College Football in Coronavirus Quarantine: On this day in CFT history, including Texas A&M’s president stating that Texas is ‘not relevant to us anymore’

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The sports world, including college football, has essentially screeched to a halt as countries around the world battle the coronavirus pandemic. As such, there’s a dearth of college football news as spring practices have all but been canceled at every level of the sport. And there’s even some concern that the health issue could have an impact on the 2020 college football campaign.

In that vein, we thought it might be fun to go back through the CollegeFootballTalk archives that stretch back to 2009 and take a peek at what transpired in the sport on this date.

So, without further ado — ok, one further ado — here’s what happened in college football on May 31, by way of our team of CFT writers both past and present.

(P.S.: If any of our readers have ideas on posts they’d like to read during this college football hiatus, leave your suggestions in the comments section.  Mailbag, maybe?)

2019

THE HEADLINE: Poppin’ bottles: SEC opens the taps by approving revised alcohol policy for conference stadiums
THE SYNOPSIS: More than half of the 14 conference schools have embraced the concept of alcohol and football on fall afternoons.

2018

THE HEADLINE: Jimbo Fisher still hasn’t signed his 10-year, $75 million contract with Texas A&M
THE SYNOPSIS: This was one of the more odd storylines of the 2018 offseason.  Or any offseason, really.  Three months later pen was put to the contract.  The 10-year, $75 million contract.

2017

THE HEADLINE: Lee Corso inks extension to remain part of ESPN’s College GameDay show
THE SYNOPSIS: A college football institution.  Still.

2014

THE HEADLINE: 2014 Oklahoma State signee now facing five felonies
THE SYNOPSIS: Devon Thomas was, not surprisingly, removed from the roster.

2013

THE HEADLINE: A&M president: Texas is ‘not relevant to us anymore’
THE SYNOPSIS: What I hear when both sides talk about renewing the rivalry? “Blah. Blah. Blah-freaking-blah.

College Football Hall of Fame damaged amidst protests in Atlanta overnight

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In the wake of the murder of George Floyd, protests have erupted across the country.  Overnight, those protests hit the home for college football history.

A peaceful protest in Atlanta Friday turned violent later in the night as many numerous businesses in the city were vandalized and looted.  According to myriad media outlets, one of those that suffered damage was the College Football Hall of Fame.

Fortunately, one of the reports stated, “none of the artifacts or history memorabilia was damaged… just the glass in front of the store.” One report, though, described the hall as being “destroyed.”

“First and foremost, our hearts go out to the friends and family of George Floyd,” College Football Hall of Fame CEO Kimberly Beaudin said in a statement. “We support the peaceful protests that honor his memory but unfortunately they deteriorated into chaos and disorder. We are heartbroken to see the damage to our city and the Hall of Fame. As our Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms said, we are better than this, better than this as a city, and better than this as a country.

“In the coming days and weeks, we’ll work to pick up the pieces, to build back the sacred walls that housed memories and honored those who played the game many of whom fought these same injustices throughout their storied careers.”

College coaches speak out following death of George Floyd

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The despicable, abhorrent, unconscionable murder of George Floyd has touched myriad aspects of our society.  College football is no different.

Monday night, 46-year-old George Floyd died after a Minneapolis Police Department officer took a knee on the man’s neck.  For several minutes.  Floyd was a black man.  The police officer is a white man.

“I can’t breathe, please, the knee in my neck. I can’t move … my neck … I’m through, I’m through.”

Four police officers connected to the death of Floyd were fired.  The white officer who murdered Floyd, Derek Chauvin, has since been charged in the black man’s death.  The 19-year veteran of the force is facing one count each of of third-degree murder and manslaughter.

Wednesday, the University of Minnesota significantly distanced itself from the Minneapolis Police Department.  The MPD assisted the university for large events, including Minnesota football games.

In the days since, college football coaches have decried the fatal brutality.  On the Rich Eisen Show Thursday, Michigan’s Jim Harbaugh spoke about the “horrendous… outrageous” murder (my words, not the coach’s) of George Floyd.

On Twitter in the ensuing days, Harbaugh’s colleagues at the collegiate level — including one ex-coach who is now an athletic director — have used their platform to decry the senseless murder of George Floyd.

Some of them, including Ole Miss’ Lane Kiffin (HERE), Florida State’s Mike Norvell (HERE), Tulsa’s Philip Montgomery (HERE), Troy’s Chip Lindsey (HERE) and UTSA’s Jeff Traylor (HERE), retweeted the powerful words of Tony Dungy.

Others sent out their own messages.

 

College Football in Coronavirus Quarantine: On this day in CFT history

college football
Getty Images
Leave a comment

The sports world, including college football, has essentially screeched to a halt as countries around the world battle the coronavirus pandemic. As such, there’s a dearth of college football news as spring practices have all but been canceled at every level of the sport. And there’s even some concern that the health issue could have an impact on the 2020 college football campaign.

In that vein, we thought it might be fun to go back through the CollegeFootballTalk archives that stretch back to 2009 and take a peek at what transpired in the sport on this date.

So, without further ado — ok, one further ado — here’s what happened in college football on May 28, by way of our team of CFT writers both past and present.

(P.S.: If any of our readers have ideas on posts they’d like to read during this college football hiatus, leave your suggestions in the comments section.  Mailbag, maybe?)

2019

THE HEADLINE: Tua Tagovailoa leapfrogs Trevor Lawrence in 2019 Heisman odds
THE SYNOPSIS: While good for fodder, this is Exhibit A as to why offseason Heisman Trophy odds are essentially meaningless.  Lawrence finished seventh in the 2019 voting.  Tagovailoa wound up 10th.  What were 2019 Heisman winner Joe Burrow‘s odds around this time?  200-1.

2018

THE HEADLINE: J.T. Barrett sees bright future for Joe Burrow at LSU
THE SYNOPSIS: I think the Ohio State transfer acquitted himself quite well down on the bayou.  Don’t you?  From our post on Burrow winning his last piece of collegiate hardware:

Wednesday, Joe Burrow was named as the winner of the 2019 Manning Award, the first LSU player to claim the trophy named in honor of the quarterbacking Mannings. That was the seventh major national award won by Burrow since the end of the 2019 regular season, to go along with the Heisman Trophythe Associated Press National Player of the Year Awardthe Maxwell Awardthe Walter Camp Awardthe Davey O’Brien Award and the Johnny Unitas Award.

Additionally, Burrow was a unanimous first-team All-American (American Football Coaches Association, Associated Press, Athletic, CBS, ESPN, Sporting News, Sports Illustrated, USA Today, Walter Camp). Of course, he was first-team All-SEC and was named as the SEC Offensive Player of the Year as well.

Burrow was also named as the MVP for the SEC championship game. In the playoffs, he was named Offensive Player of the Game for both the semifinal win over Oklahoma and the national championship victory over Clemson.

2014

THE HEADLINE: Nick Saban would recruit openly gay player to Alabama
THE SYNOPSIS: Is there any doubt that the Nicktator would bring in anyone who could help him win?  Regardless of race, creed, color, religion or sexual proclivity?  Didn’t think so.

2013

THE HEADLINE: SEC to continue with eight conference games, but nine could come soon
THE SYNOPSIS: Seven years later, it’s still ROTMFFLMMFAO when it comes to this subject.

2012

THE HEADLINE: War vet, Purple Heart honoree close to walking on at Clemson
THE SYNOPSIS: This post came, appropriately enough, on Memorial Day.  Daniel Rodriguez is a true hero.  In every sense of the word.

2011

THE HEADLINE: JoePa still a ‘bargain basement’ HOF head coach
THE SYNOPSIS: Sadly, some would refer to Joe Paterno‘s legacy as that of a bargain-basement human being when it came to Jerry Sandusky’s victims.  And turning a blind eye to them.