college football
Getty Images

College Football in Coronavirus Quarantine: On this day in CFT history, including Mack Brown in 2017 not ruling out a return to coaching ‘if the right situation came up’

Leave a comment

The sports world, including college football, has essentially screeched to a halt as countries around the world battle the coronavirus pandemic. As such, there’s a dearth of college football news as spring practices have all but been canceled at every level of the sport. And there’s even some concern that the health issue could have an impact on the 2020 college football campaign.

In that vein, we thought it might be fun to go back through the CollegeFootballTalk archives that stretch back to 2009 and take a peek at what transpired in the sport on this date.

So, without further ado — ok, one further ado — here’s what happened in college football on June 1, by way of our team of CFT writers both past and present.

(P.S.: If any of our readers have ideas on posts they’d like to read during this college football hiatus, leave your suggestions in the comments section.  Mailbag, maybe?)

2019

THE HEADLINE: Big 12 distributes record $38.8 million
THE SYNOPSIS: That’s per school.  And, this year, that number has dropped because of the coronavirus pandemic.

2018

THE HEADLINE: Despite first-round potential in MLB Draft, Lincoln Riley expects Kyler Murray to be Sooners QB
THE SYNOPSIS: Murray was indeed selected in the first round of the 2019 Major League Baseball Draft.  The ninth player selected, in fact.  Murray, though, remained true to the Sooners.  And claimed the Heisman Trophy later that year.

2017

THE HEADLINE: Bill Snyder confirms, defends decision to limit transferring WR’s options
THE SYNOPSIS: The legendary Kansas State head coach was usually the classiest guy in college football.  This wasn’t one of those times.

2017

THE HEADLINE: Mack Brown not ruling out a return to coaching ‘if the right situation came up’
THE SYNOPSIS: In November of 2018, Brown indeed returned.  To both coaching and North Carolina.  And he’s been killing it both on and off the field.

2015

THE HEADLINE: UAB football to be reinstated and return to C-USA play… eventually
THE SYNOPSIS: The program was shuttered the previous December.  It officially returned in 2017.   A year later, the Blazers won the Conference USA championship.  And claimed their first-ever bowl win.

2012

THE HEADLINE: SEC unanimously supports top-four playoff model
THE SYNOPSIS: Obviously, this was the model the College Football Playoff went with.  The SEC has won three (Alabama 2015, 2017; LSU 2019) of the CFP title games.  Clemson has won two, while Ohio State won the inaugural one.

2011

THE HEADLINE: Maize & blue t-shirt mocks Jim Tressel’s demise
THE SYNOPSIS: Michigan fans took great glee in the resignation of the Sweatervest. “Vest in peace,” the t-shirt read. On an unrelated note, Tressel went 9-1 vs. U-M.  All told, Ohio State has won 18 of the last 19 meetings in the rivalry.

College Football Hall of Fame damaged amidst protests in Atlanta overnight

George Floyd
Getty Images
9 Comments

In the wake of the murder of George Floyd, protests have erupted across the country.  Overnight, those protests hit the home for college football history.

A peaceful protest in Atlanta Friday turned violent later in the night as many numerous businesses in the city were vandalized and looted.  According to myriad media outlets, one of those that suffered damage was the College Football Hall of Fame.

Fortunately, one of the reports stated, “none of the artifacts or history memorabilia was damaged… just the glass in front of the store.” One report, though, described the hall as being “destroyed.”

“First and foremost, our hearts go out to the friends and family of George Floyd,” College Football Hall of Fame CEO Kimberly Beaudin said in a statement. “We support the peaceful protests that honor his memory but unfortunately they deteriorated into chaos and disorder. We are heartbroken to see the damage to our city and the Hall of Fame. As our Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms said, we are better than this, better than this as a city, and better than this as a country.

“In the coming days and weeks, we’ll work to pick up the pieces, to build back the sacred walls that housed memories and honored those who played the game many of whom fought these same injustices throughout their storied careers.”

College coaches speak out following death of George Floyd

5 Comments

The despicable, abhorrent, unconscionable murder of George Floyd has touched myriad aspects of our society.  College football is no different.

Monday night, 46-year-old George Floyd died after a Minneapolis Police Department officer took a knee on the man’s neck.  For several minutes.  Floyd was a black man.  The police officer is a white man.

“I can’t breathe, please, the knee in my neck. I can’t move … my neck … I’m through, I’m through.”

Four police officers connected to the death of Floyd were fired.  The white officer who murdered Floyd, Derek Chauvin, has since been charged in the black man’s death.  The 19-year veteran of the force is facing one count each of of third-degree murder and manslaughter.

Wednesday, the University of Minnesota significantly distanced itself from the Minneapolis Police Department.  The MPD assisted the university for large events, including Minnesota football games.

In the days since, college football coaches have decried the fatal brutality.  On the Rich Eisen Show Thursday, Michigan’s Jim Harbaugh spoke about the “horrendous… outrageous” murder (my words, not the coach’s) of George Floyd.

On Twitter in the ensuing days, Harbaugh’s colleagues at the collegiate level — including one ex-coach who is now an athletic director — have used their platform to decry the senseless murder of George Floyd.

Some of them, including Ole Miss’ Lane Kiffin (HERE), Florida State’s Mike Norvell (HERE), Tulsa’s Philip Montgomery (HERE), Troy’s Chip Lindsey (HERE) and UTSA’s Jeff Traylor (HERE), retweeted the powerful words of Tony Dungy.

Others sent out their own messages.

 

Houston confirms addition of Texas Tech transfer RB Ta’Zhawn Henry

Houston football
Getty Images
Leave a comment

Houston, we have… officially added a Power Five football transfer.

In mid-May, Ta’Zhawn Henry announced that he had committed to playing for Houston football.  Two months prior, the running back had decided to transfer from Texas Tech and look elsewhere to continue his collegiate playing career.

Wednesday, Houston confirmed Henry’s addition to the football roster.

Houston also confirmed that Henry will have to sit out the 2020 football season.  He would then have two seasons of eligibility he can use beginning with the 2021 season.

Henry was a three-star member of the Texas Tech football Class of 2018.  The Houston high schooler was the No. 22 all-purpose back in the country in that year’s class.

Henry played in 20 games the past two seasons for the Red Raiders.  He started seven of those contests.

In those appearances, Henry totaled 681 yards and 11 touchdowns on 161 carries.  He also caught 44 passes for another 282 yards and one touchdown.

In 2019, Henry also averaged 24.5 yards on 13 kick returns.

Houston is coming off a 4-8 2019 season under first-year head coach Dana Holgorsen.  That was the program’s worst record since the Cougars went 3-8 in 2004.  It was the worst first year for a UH head coach since Dana Dimel went 3-8 in 2000.

NCAA extends recruiting dead period through July 31; The Association will also allow strength coaches to ‘virtually observe voluntary physical workouts’

NCAA
Getty Images
Leave a comment

Not surprisingly, the NCAA has reset its recruiting trail policies.  Again.

As the coronavirus pandemic effectively shuttered the sports world, the NCAA announced in mid-March that it was putting a halt to all in-person recruiting until at least April 15.  Last month, that dead period was extended through May 31.  This month, another extension took us to June 30.

As we close in on the month of June, another extension is official.  As expected, the NCAA announced Wednesday evening that the recruiting dead period has been extended through July 31.  That means all in-person recruiting activities — either on-campus or elsewhere — are prohibited.

The latest edict impacts all sports, not just football.

“The extension maintains consistent recruiting rules for all sports and allows coaches to focus on the student-athletes who may be returning to campus,” said Division I Council Coordination Committee chair M. Grace Calhoun, athletics director at Pennsylvania, said in a statement. “The committee is committed to reviewing the dead period again in late June or early July.”

One potential effect of all of these dead-period extension bans?  It could force The Association to, for one year, temporarily get rid of the December Early Signing Period.

The NCAA earlier this month also announced that football programs could begin bringing players back to campus for voluntary workouts starting June 1.  In the dead-period release, The Association also updated its tack on that front:

Additionally, the committee decided to allow strength and conditioning coaches to virtually observe voluntary physical workouts for health and safety purposes but only if requested by the student-athlete. The measure goes into effect June 1. The strength and conditioning coach will be allowed to observe the workouts and discuss items related to voluntary workouts but not direct or conduct the workout.

The decision was supported by the Committee on Safeguards and Medical Aspects of Sports Prevention and Performance Subcommittee. The subcommittee encouraged schools that decide to allow their strength and conditioning coaches to observe voluntary workouts to proactively consider the school’s overarching responsibility to protect the health of and provide a safe environment for each student-athlete. More specifically, the subcommittee stressed that schools should plan for how the strength and conditioning coach should respond if they observe an unsafe workout environment or in the event that a medical emergency occurs during a voluntary session.

The committee will continue to explore the opportunity for strength and conditioning coaches to conduct voluntary workouts virtually, as they do during in-person, on-campus voluntary workouts.