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Utah State confirms addition of former Utah and BYU RB Devonta’e Henry-Cole

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Utah State is officially the beneficiary of one football player’s wild trek through the Beehive State.

In late January, Utah’s Devonta’e Henry-Cole officially entered his name into the NCAA transfer database. In early February, the running back took to his personal Twitter account — “RUN DHC,” which. Is. Awesome. — to announce that he had committed to continuing his collegiate playing career with the BYU Cougars football team.  He even signed with the football independent to cement his move to the other side of the Holy War.

However, earlier this month, it was reported that Henry-Cole was seeking a release from BYU.  So he can again transfer. This time, to Utah State.  To where his one-time Utes teammate, quarterback Jason Shelleytransferred earlier this month.

Wednesday, Utah State confirmed Henry-Cole’s addition to its football roster. Henry-Cole, a graduate transfer, (probably) has one year of eligibility and is cleared to play for USU this fall.

A three-star 2016 signee, Henry-Cole played in one game as a true freshman. He took a redshirt for the 2018 season because of injury. It’s entirely possible Henry-Cole could petition the NCAA for a sixth season. That, though, hasn’t been determined.

When healthy, Henry-Cole ran for 469 yards and four touchdowns on 90 carries during his time with the Utes. He also caught a touchdown pass among his three receptions.

At this time, Utah State and BYU are scheduled to play Oct. 2 of this season.  In Provo.  So there’s that.

The Aggies are coming off a 7-6 record in their second first season under Gary Andersen.  Anderson also served as the USU head coach from 2009-12.  In his final season in Logan, Andersen led Utah State to a school-record 11 wins. That mark was matched six years later by Matt Wells.  That season helped Wells land the Texas Tech job.  And led Andersen back to USU.

Utah RB who signed with BYU in February seeking release to transfer to Utah State

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Utah, BYU and Utah State in some type of bizarro transfer ménage à trois?  Bring it on, 2020.  Bring it on.

But first, the seductive backstory.

In late January, Utah’s Devonta’e Henry-Cole officially entered his name into the NCAA transfer database. In early February, the running back took to his personal Twitter account — “RUN DHC,” which. Is. Awesome. — to announce that he had committed to continuing his collegiate playing career with the BYU Cougars football team.  He even signed with the football independent to cement his move to the other side of the Holy War.

But wait, there’s more.

According to the Deseret News, Henry-Cole is now seeking a release from BYU.  So he can again transfer. This time, to Utah State.  To where his one-time Utes teammate, quarterback Jason Shelley, transferred earlier this month.

And thus continues the Beehive State three-way involving Utah, BYU and Utah State.  And one talented running back.

If the latest move comes to fruition, Henry-Cole would be able to play immediately for the Mountain West Conference school as a graduate transfer. It’ll be his last season of eligibility. Probably.

A three-star 2016 signee, Henry-Cole played in one game as a true freshman. He took a redshirt for the 2018 season because of injury. It’s entirely possible Henry-Cole could petition the NCAA for a sixth season. That, though, hasn’t been determined.

When healthy, Henry-Cole ran for 469 yards and four touchdowns on 90 carries during his time with the Utes. He also caught a touchdown pass among his three receptions.

At this time, Utah State and BYU are scheduled to play Oct. 2 of this season.  In Provo.  So there’s that.

Texas Tech the landing spot for Utah State transfer QB Henry Colombi

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Thanks to Texas Tech, one erstwhile Utah State football player didn’t have to wait long to find a new collegiate home.  At all.

In the middle of last week, it was reported that Henry Colombi had entered his name into the NCAA transfer database.  Monday, the USU transfer quarterback announced via Twitter that he is headed to Lubbock and the Texas Tech football team.

In the Twitter missive, he also thanked Aggies fans for “showing nothing but love and support” during his time in Logan.

First off, I would like to thank Aggie nation for welcoming me into their family 3 years ago and showing nothing but love and support. I have created a number of relationships and memories that I will cherish forever. Logan will always have a special place in my heart and I am thankful for my time here. The last week has been very overwhelming, and I would like to thank all of the schools who have reached out to me during this time and given me an opportunity to play for them. Through days of prayer and conversations with my family, it was clear to me God has a plan for me and I trust him to lead me in the right direction. With that being said, I will be spending my next two years with the coaches that believed in me and my potential from the very beginning. I am very excited to announce that I am committed to Texas Tech University. #GunsUp!

Colombi was a three-star member of the Utah State Class of 2017. The Fort Lauderdale product was rated as the No. 47 pro-style quarterback in the country.

The head coach who recruited Colombi to USU?  Matt Wells, who is now in the same position with the Red Raiders.

As a true freshman, Colombi took a redshirt.  The past two seasons, he appeared in a total of 13 games.  In that time, he completed 53-of-69 passes (that’s 76.8% for those without a calculator) for 460 yards, two touchdowns and one interception.  He also ran for 139 yards and another two touchdowns on 27 carries.

It’s believed Colombi will be joining the Red Raiders as a graduate transfer.  He will have two years of eligibility at his disposal.

Colombi’s decision to leave Utah State came a couple of days after Utah quarterback Jason Shelley officially transferred to USU.  Prior to Shelley’s signing, Colombi had been the favorite to replace starter Jordan Love.

Presumptive replacement for Jordan Love at QB for Utah State enters transfer portal

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Utah State football doesn’t know yet who will replace Jordan Love under center.  The Aggies do, though, know who won’t.  Probably.

Henry Colombi spent the 2019 season as Love’s primary backup.  Throughout the offseason, Colombi had been viewed as the likely starter heading into the 2020 season.  However, it’s now being reported that the quarterback has entered the NCAA transfer database.  That would be Colombi’s first step in leaving the Utah State football program.

While Colombi hasn’t publicly confirmed the move, he did use Twitter to retweet tweets that indicated he is moving on.  The development does, though, come a couple of days after Utah quarterback Jason Shelley officially transferred to USU.

Now, for what’s seemingly becoming a daily disclaimer when it comes to transfers.

As we’ve stated myriad times in the past, a player can remove his name from the portal and remain at the same school. At this point, though, other programs are permitted to contact a player without receiving permission from his current football program.

NCAA bylaws also permit schools to pull a portal entrant’s scholarship at the end of the semester in which he entered it.

Colombi was a three-star member of the Utah State Class of 2017. The Fort Lauderdale product was rated as the No. 47 pro-style quarterback in the country.

As a true freshman, Colombi took a redshirt.  The past two seasons, he appeared in a total of 13 games.  In that time, he completed 53-of-69 passes (that’s 76.8% for those without a calculator) for 460 yards, two touchdowns and one interception.  He also ran for 139 yards and another two touchdowns on 27 carries.

The Aggies are coming off a 7-6 record in their second first season under Gary Andersen.  Anderson also served as the USU head coach from 2009-12.  In his final season in Logan, Andersen led Utah State to a school-record 11 wins. That mark was matched six years later by Matt Wells.  That season helped Wells land the Texas Tech job.  And led Andersen back to USU.

2019 finalist Chuba Hubbard, 2018 finalist Travis Etienne two of the 76 Doak Walker Award watch listers

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If you’re a starting running back at the FBS level, there’s a fairly good chance you are part of the Doak Walker Award watch list.

Monday, it was the Bednarik Award kicking off watch list season.  Tuesday, the Davey O’Brien Award joined in.  A day later, the Doak Walker Award joined the burgeoning list of honors releasing their preseason watch lists.

This award, given annually to the nation’s top running back, features a whopping 76 preseason candidates.  Included in that are 2019 finalist Chuba Hubbard of Oklahoma State and 2018 finalist Travis Etienne of Clemson.  Last year’s winner was Wisconsin’s Jonathan Taylor.

Every FBS conference is represented on the list.  The Big Ten and Pac-12 lead the way with 10 apiece, followed by the ACC and SEC with nine each.  The other Power Five, the Big 12, landed five. Wih seven apiece, the Mountain West and Sun Belt led all Group of Five conferences.

Of the more than six dozen watch listers, 30 of them are seniors.  Another 28 are juniors while the other 18 are sophomores.

Below are all 76 running backs who make up this year’s Doak Walker Award preseason watch list.

Drake Anderson (So.), Northwestern
David Bailey (Jr.), Boston College
Max Borghi (Jr.), Washington State
Rakeem Boyd (Sr.), Arkansas
Gary Brightwell (Sr.), Arizona
Kennedy Brooks (Jr.), Oklahoma
Shamari Brooks (Sr.), Tulsa
Christopher Brown, Jr. (Jr.), Cal
Journey Brown (Jr.), Penn State
Spencer Brown (Sr.), UAB
Noah Cain (So.), Penn State
Jamale Carothers (Jr.), Navy
Stephen Carr (Sr.), USC
Michael Carter (Sr.), North Carolina
Andrew Clair (Jr.), Bowling Green
Elijah Collins (So.), Michigan State
James Cook (Jr.), Georgia
Jashaun Corbin (So.), Florida State
ReMahn Davis (So.), Temple
Travis Etienne (Sr.), Clemson
Demetric Felton (Sr.), UCLA
Alex Fontenot (Jr.), Colorado
Kenneth Gainwell (So.), Memphis
Tyler Goodson (So.), Iowa
Eric Gray (So.), Tennessee
Breece Hall (So.), Iowa State
Najee Harris (Sr.), Alabama
Javian Hawkins (So.), Louisville
Justin Henderson (Sr.), Louisiana Tech
Kylin Hill (Sr.), Mississippi State
George Holani (So.), Boise State
Chuba Hubbard (Jr.), Oklahoma State
Caleb Huntley (Sr.), Ball State
Mohamed Ibrahim (Jr.), Minnesota
Keaontay Ingram (Jr.), Texas
Deon Jackson (Sr.), Duke
Jermar Jefferson (Jr.), Oregon State
Josh Johnson (Sr.), ULM
Amare Jones (Jr.), Tulane
Lopini Katoa (Jr.), BYU
Wesley Kennedy III (Sr.), Georgia Southern
JD King (Sr.), Georgia Southern
Brenden Knox (Jr.), Marshall
Bryant Koback (Jr.), Toledo
Kobe Lewis (Jr.), Central Michigan
Vavae Malepeai (Sr.), USC
Kevin Marks (Jr.), Buffalo
Jordan Mason (Jr.), Georgia Tech
Kevin Mensah (Sr.), Connecticut
Dedrick Mills (Sr.), Nebraska
Elijah Mitchell (Sr.), Louisiana-Lafayette
Marcel Murray (Jr.), Arkansas State
Richard Newton (So.), Washington
Jaret Patterson (Jr.), Buffalo
Trey Ragas (Sr.), Louisiana-Lafayette
Miles Reed (Jr.), Hawaii
Ronnie Rivers (Sr.), Fresno State
Larry Rountree III (Sr.), Missouri
Mekhi Sargent (Sr.), Iowa
Stevie Scott III (Jr.), Indiana
B.J. Smith (Sr.), Troy
Isaiah Spiller (So.), Texas A&M
SaRodorick Thompson (So.), Texas Tech
Toa Taua (Jr.), Nevada
Corey Taylor II (Sr.), Tulsa
Xazavian Valladay (Jr.), Wyoming
CJ Verdell (Jr.), Oregon
Quardraiz Wadley (Sr.), UTEP
Gaej Walker (Sr.), Western Kentucky
Kenneth Walker III (So.), Wake Forest
Jaylen Warren (Sr.), Utah State
Nakia Watson (So.), Wisconsin
Zamir White (So.), Georgia
Charles Williams (Sr.), UNLV
Javonte Williams (Jr.), North Carolina
D.J. Williams (So.), Auburn