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Washington adds FCS All-American QB Kevin Thomson

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Washington has turned to a lower level of the sport to bolster its football roster.  Specifically, its quarterback room.

Wednesday, it was confirmed by the school that Kevin Thomson has transferred into the Washington football team.  The move is a homecoming of sorts as Thomson played his high school football in Auburn, Wash.  That town is roughly a half-hour drive from the UW campus.

“We’re really pleased that Kevin is returning to play for his hometown school,” first-year Washington head football coach Jimmy Lake said in a statement. “He adds a lot of experience to our quarterbacks room and should help raise the level of competition for everyone.”

As a graduate transfer coming in from the FCS, Thomson is eligible to play immediately in 2020.  This season will serve as his final year of eligibility.

Thomson comes to UW after spending the last four seasons at Sacramento State.   This past season, Thomson passed for 3,216 yards and 27 touchdowns and ran for another 619 yards and 12 scores.  He was an FCS All-American and Big Sky Offensive Player of the Year for the 2019 season.

In the voting for the 2019 Walter Payton Award, given to the nation’s top FCS offensive player, Thomson finished third.

Washington is looking to replace starter Jacob Eason, who left college football a year early for the 2020 NFL Draft.  Thomson will enter an Eason-less room that currently consists of redshirt sophomore Jacob Sirmon, redshirt freshman Dylan Morris and true freshman Ethan Garbers.  That trio has combined to start zero games and attempt three passes at the collegiate level.

NCAA Council formally approves six-week preseason model for football, which will begin July 13 for teams that start season Sept. 5

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The NCAA is proceeding with a significant step toward prepping for the 2020 college football season.

Earlier this month, it was confirmed that the NCAA Div. I Oversight Committee was crafting a plan that would shape the path college football programs would take to prepare for the upcoming season.  Last week, the NCAA announced that it has finalized its proposal for a preseason model for the sport.  However, the plan still needed the approval of the NCAA Division I Council.

Thursday, that expected thumbs-up came to fruition as the council has approved what will essentially be a six-week preseason for college football.  The NCAA writes that, “[a]ssuming a first game on Sept. 5, the model begins summer access activities July 13 and adds meetings and walk-throughs July 24.  Preseason practice begins Aug. 7.” Schools that open the seasoning Week 0 (Aug. 29), all of the dates would get seven days subtracted from them.  It’s unclear if teams whose first games are Sept. 3 will follow the Sept. 5 model or not.

The activities mentioned do not include the ongoing voluntary on-campus workouts.

As for the particulars?  The NCAA referred to its previous release as a guideline:

… student-athletes may be required to participate in up to eight hours of weight training, conditioning and film review per week (not more than two hours of film review per week) from July 13-23.

Then, from July 24 through Aug. 6, student-athletes may be required to participate in up to 20 hours of countable athletically related activities per week (not more than four hours per day) as follows:

— Up to eight hours per week for weight training and conditioning.
— Up to six hours per week for walk-throughs, which may include the use of a football.
— Up to six hours per week for meetings, which may include film review, team meetings, position meetings, one-on-one meetings, etc.
— During this 14-day period, student-athletes are required to get at least two days off.

The model does not make any adjustments to the legislated 29-day preseason practice period. In the previous example, the school’s preseason practice period would begin Aug. 7 with a five-day acclimatization period, followed by the opportunity for up to 25 on-field practices.

Pac-12 football players returning to campus for voluntary workouts — except the California schools such as UCLA and USC

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As the rest of the Pac-12 gets back to some sense of normalcy, UCLA and USC are on the outside looking in. And Cal and Stanford for that matter.

Late last month, the Pac-12 announced that it would allow member institutions to permit student-athletes to begin returning for voluntary on-campus workouts beginning June 15.  The schools, though, were subject to the guidelines set by the states in which they reside.

Monday, of course, was June 15.  And, per the conference edict, most schools in the league began the process of allowing football players back on campus for workouts.  The noteworthy exceptions?  Cal, Stanford, UCLA and USC, of course.

From the Los Angeles Times:

Across the Pac-12 footprint Monday — other than in California, the only state with schools that did not meet the conference’s approved June 15 reopening date, leaving USC and UCLA to watch from the sideline — players returned to a different world. They were welcomed back with swabs thrust deep into their nasal passages as part of COVID-19 testing, which within 48 hours would give each player a baseline answer needed to start college football’s big experiment: Do I have it?

Just when the Golden State’s guidelines will allow both Bruins and Trojans football players to return to campus for workouts is an unknown at the moment.  At this point, there are no indications as to if Cal, Stanford and/or USC can return at some point this month.  One report indicated that UCLA could begin its workouts in June, but that’s far from a certainty.

UPDATED JUNE 17, 2020, at 1:14 p.m. ET: UCLA has announced a phased return for football players, other athletes that would begin June 22.  Voluntary on-campus workouts, though, wouldn’t start until the following Monday at the earliest.

College Football in Coronavirus Quarantine: On this day in CFT history, including Urban Meyer proclaiming his 2008 Florida ‘the best to ever play the game’

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The sports world, including college football, has essentially screeched to a halt as countries around the world battle the coronavirus pandemic. As such, there’s a dearth of college football news as spring practices have all but been canceled at every level of the sport. And there’s even some concern that the health issue could have an impact on the 2020 college football campaign.

In that vein, we thought it might be fun to go back through the CollegeFootballTalk archives that stretch back to 2009 and take a peek at what transpired in the sport on this date.

So, without further ado — ok, one further ado — here’s what happened in college football on June 16, by way of our team of CFT writers both past and present.

(P.S.: If any of our readers have ideas on posts they’d like to read during this college football hiatus, leave your suggestions in the comments section.  Mailbag, maybe?)

2019

THE HEADLINE: Trevor Lawrence once again says he has no desire to skip bowl games to protect NFL stock
THE SYNOPSIS: Lawrence has been consistent with this stance throughout.  He’ll have one more “test” after this season before likely becoming the No. 1 overall pick of the 2021 NFL Draft.

2018

THE HEADLINE: Urban Meyer officially names Dwayne Haskins Ohio State’s starting QB heading into training camp
THE SYNOPSIS: Haskins beat out Joe Burrow for the starting job.  Burrow, as you may have heard, transferred from OSU to LSU after it became apparent Haskins was the man under center for the Buckeyes.  In his lone season as the full-time starter, Haskins threw for 4,831 yards and 50 touchdowns.  Last year, Burrow was even better as he totaled 5,671 yards and  60 touchdowns en route to the Heisman Trophy and national title.

2016

THE HEADLINE: Art Briles not going quietly as ex-coach accuses Baylor of wrongful termination
THE SYNOPSIS: Too bad for all involved the disgraced head coach didn’t just shut up and go away.

2015

THE HEADLINE: Joe Paterno to be inducted into Pennsylvania Sports Hall of Fame
THE SYNOPSIS: Speaking of disgraced head coaches…

2014

THE HEADLINE: Urban Meyer: ’08 Gators ‘the best team to ever play the game’
THE SYNOPSIS: Needless to say, this proclamation kicked up quite the kerfuffle.  And the mid-nineties Nebraska teams were better anyway.

2013

THE HEADLINE: Johnny Manziel ‘can’t wait to leave College Station’
THE SYNOPSIS: Johnny Football gonna Johnny Football, y’all. Manziel quickly deleted the tweet that contained the statement.  In its place, Manziel tweeted, “Don’t ever forget that I love A&M with all of my heart, but please please walk a day in my shoes.”

2012

THE HEADLINE: Coach K: firing of Joe Paterno ‘horrible… a real mistake’
THE SYNOPSIS: Mike Krzyzewski wasn’t a fan of Penn State’s decision.  Most non-Penn State fans weren’t a fan of the Duke hoops coach’s opinion.

2011

THE HEADLINE: Saggin’ drawers net grieving Lobo an arrest
THE SYNOPSIS: Offseason headlines, y’all!

2010

THE HEADLINE: It’s official: Pac-10 extends invite to Utah
THE SYNOPSIS: The Utes left the Mountain West to join what’s now the Pac-12.

College Football in Coronavirus Quarantine: On this day in CFT history, including Texas officially turning down invitation to join the Pac-10

college football
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Leave a comment

The sports world, including college football, has essentially screeched to a halt as countries around the world battle the coronavirus pandemic. As such, there’s a dearth of college football news as spring practices have all but been canceled at every level of the sport. And there’s even some concern that the health issue could have an impact on the 2020 college football campaign.

In that vein, we thought it might be fun to go back through the CollegeFootballTalk archives that stretch back to 2009 and take a peek at what transpired in the sport on this date.

So, without further ado — ok, one further ado — here’s what happened in college football on June 14, by way of our team of CFT writers both past and present.

(P.S.: If any of our readers have ideas on posts they’d like to read during this college football hiatus, leave your suggestions in the comments section.  Mailbag, maybe?)

2019

THE HEADLINE: Big 12 coaches on hot seat: Where it is somehow possible for nobody to have a hot seat in 2019
THE SYNOPSIS: There was just one coaching change in the Big 12 following the 2019 season.  And that was Baylor’s Matt Rhule leaving for the NFL.

2017

THE HEADLINE: Oklahoma confirms hiring of Ruffin McNeill as DT coach
THE SYNOPSIS: McNeill got a raw deal in getting kicked to the curb by East Carolina. McNeill then dealt with a raw family deal that forced him to step down from his duties earlier this year.

2015

THE HEADLINE: Report: Gator, ‘Nole athletes avoid legal charges more than other students, schools
THE SYNOPSIS: This caused a bit of a kerfuffle in the comments.  No idea why.

2014

THE HEADLINE: Champion ‘Noles may not make White House pilgrimage
THE SYNOPSIS: No, this had nothing to do with President Trump.  This had everything to do with Florid State and President Obama’s White House not being able to find a suitable date for both sides. And never could.

2012

THE HEADLINE: After weekend Tide visit, five-star RB decommits from UGA
THE SYNOPSIS: That blue-chip prospect?  Derrick Henry.  Who went on to win the 2015 Heisman Trophy.  While at Alabama.  The presence of both Todd Gurley and Nick Chubb in the same Georgia backfield, though, helped the Bulldogs get by.

2010

THE HEADLINE: Done deal: Texas turns down Pac-10 invite
THE SYNOPSIS: It’s hard to express just how huge this was.  If Texas would’ve left the Big 12?  It’s entirely possible the Big 12 would’ve ceased to exist as everybody else would’ve jumped ship.  And the era of a couple of superconferences (Pac-16, Big Sixteen, 16-school ACC & SEC, for example) could very well have been upon us.  So, yeah, this was kind of a big deal.