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Latest odds have Clemson, Ohio State strong favorites to make College Football Playoff

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It’s been a while since we’ve discussed anything related to College Football Playoff odds, so how about we rectify that this weekend?

When last we left, Clemson was a 5/2 favorite to win the 2020 national championship.  Ohio State was next at 3/1, followed by Alabama (5/1) and Georgia (7/1).  According to the Westgate Las Vegas Superbook, its updated College Football Playoff odds — that means qualify for the field, not winning it — has Clemson and Ohio State dead even at 1/3.  The Tigers and Buckeyes, of course, met in the semifinals of the 2019 playoffs.  Alabama, which failed to qualify for the CFP for the first time in its history last season, is next up at 6/5, while Georgia would fill out the four-team wagering field at 2/1.

Interestingly, Florida is nipping at its SEC East rival’s heels at 3/1.  Oklahoma, another 2019 CFP participant, sits at 7/2.  Four other schools are in single digits, and that quartet comes in at 7/1 — Notre Dame Oregon, Penn State, Texas and Texas A&M.

As for the reigning national champions?  LSU sits at 10/1, the same set of College Football Playoff odds as Auburn.

A pair of Big Ten teams, Michigan and Wisconsin, come in at 12/1.  USC, meanwhile, has garnered 15/1 odds.

No teams outside of the Power Five have been given odds.  In case you were wondering.

College Football in Coronavirus Quarantine: On this day in CFT history, including Russell Wilson opting for football over baseball and Wisconsin over Auburn

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The sports world, including college football, has essentially screeched to a halt as countries around the world battle the coronavirus pandemic. As such, there’s a dearth of college football news as spring practices have all but been canceled at every level of the sport. And there’s even some concern that the health issue could have an impact on the 2020 college football campaign.

In that vein, we thought it might be fun to go back through the CollegeFootballTalk archives that stretch back to 2009 and take a peek at what transpired in the sport on this date.

So, without further ado — ok, one further ado — here’s what happened in college football on June 27, by way of our team of CFT writers both past and present.

(P.S.: If any of our readers have ideas on posts they’d like to read during this college football hiatus, leave your suggestions in the comments section.  Mailbag, maybe?)

2019

THE HEADLINE: AAC statement on UConn’s departure: We wish them well
THE SYNOPSIS: All of the Huskies’ non-football sports left for the Big East.  The Huskies will play their first season as a college football independent in 2020.

2018

THE HEADLINE: Oklahoma State AD regrets public comments about Mike Gundy’s recruiting
THE SYNOPSIS: Regret has seemingly taken up permanent residence in Stillwater.

2015

THE HEADLINE: Ole Miss OL Laremy Tunsil charged with domestic violence after defending his mother
THE SYNOPSIS: On the field, Tunsil was everything as advertised on the field.  Off the field, well… ya see…

2013

THE HEADLINE: Kirk Herbstreit signs with ESPN through 2022
THE SYNOPSIS: We have not been able to find evidence that ESPN has extended Herbstreit’s contract even further in the ensuing seven years.

2012

THE HEADLINE: Atlanta wants in on hosting a playoff game too
THE SYNOPSIS: As the Peach Bowl, Atlanta has hosted a pair of semifinal matchups (2016 season, 2019). The city also hosted the championship game for the 2017 season.

2011

THE HEADLINE: Russell Wilson opts for football, Wisconsin
THE SYNOPSIS: Wilson eschewed baseball, Auburn in doing so.  The rest, as they say, is history.

College Football in Coronavirus Quarantine: On this day in CFT history, including Urban Meyer reminding us that he constantly thinks about the Michigan rivalry

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The sports world, including college football, has essentially screeched to a halt as countries around the world battle the coronavirus pandemic. As such, there’s a dearth of college football news as spring practices have all but been canceled at every level of the sport. And there’s even some concern that the health issue could have an impact on the 2020 college football campaign.

In that vein, we thought it might be fun to go back through the CollegeFootballTalk archives that stretch back to 2009 and take a peek at what transpired in the sport on this date.

So, without further ado — ok, one further ado — here’s what happened in college football on June 21, by way of our team of CFT writers both past and present.

(P.S.: If any of our readers have ideas on posts they’d like to read during this college football hiatus, leave your suggestions in the comments section.  Mailbag, maybe?)

2019

THE HEADLINE: Father of LSU football player reportedly received $180K in stolen money from booster
THE SYNOPSIS: That booster was sentenced to 33 months in prison last October.  Thus far, there have no NCAA issues arising from this for LSU.

2018

THE HEADLINE: Big Ten revenue distribution hits $51 million
THE SYNOPSIS: And some fans continue to bitch about players profiting off their own names/images/likenesses.

2015

THE HEADLINE: Urban Meyer constantly thinking about Michigan rivalry
THE SYNOPSIS: During his time at Ohio State, Meyer went 8-1 against That Team Up North.  1-1 as a graduate assistant from 1986-87.  7-0 as head coach from 2012-18.

2012

THE HEADLINE: Harvey Updyke’s trial delayed… again
THE SYNOPSIS: Anybody miss the days of almost daily Updyke updates?  Yeah, neither do I.

2011

THE HEADLINE: North Carolina Notice of Allegations targets John Blake, Jennifer Wiley
THE SYNOPSIS: This was part of the path that led to Butch Davisdismissal as head coachA month before the season kicked off.

2011

THE HEADLINE: BMV probe finds no wrongdoing in vehicle purchases by OSU players
THE SYNOPSIS: Hoo-boy.  Non-Ohio State fans were in a tizzy and/or uproar over this one.

2010

THE HEADLINE:
THE SYNOPSIS:

College Football in Coronavirus Quarantine: On this day in CFT history, including Mark Emmert suggesting six years ago that paying players would doom college sports

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The sports world, including college football, has essentially screeched to a halt as countries around the world battle the coronavirus pandemic. As such, there’s a dearth of college football news as spring practices have all but been canceled at every level of the sport. And there’s even some concern that the health issue could have an impact on the 2020 college football campaign.

In that vein, we thought it might be fun to go back through the CollegeFootballTalk archives that stretch back to 2009 and take a peek at what transpired in the sport on this date.

So, without further ado — ok, one further ado — here’s what happened in college football on June 19, by way of our team of CFT writers both past and present.

(P.S.: If any of our readers have ideas on posts they’d like to read during this college football hiatus, leave your suggestions in the comments section.  Mailbag, maybe?)

2019

THE HEADLINE: Big Ten coaches on hot seat: Record revenues mean those big buyouts don’t mean quite as much
THE SYNOPSIS: Just two B1G programs will have different coaches in 2020.  Chris Ash was fired by Rutgers.  And Mark Dantoniostepped down” at Michigan State.

2018

THE HEADLINE: Lincoln Riley will (barely) make more than his starting QB in 2018
THE SYNOPSIS: The head coach made $4.8 million in guaranteed compensation. Kyler Murray, the ninth-overall pick of the 2019 MLB Draft, was paid a $4.7 million signing bonus.

2016

THE HEADLINE: Tennessee lands eight commitments in one day
THE SYNOPSIS: The 2017-18 seasons produced a combined nine wins.  Vols fans can only hope this year’s recruiting rush produces better on-field results.

2015

THE HEADLINE: Jim Harbaugh effect helping to turn around ticket sales at Michigan
THE SYNOPSIS: In five seasons under Harbaugh, the Wolverines have finished third or fourth in The Big Ten East four times.  U-M is also 0-5 vs. rival Ohio State.

2014

THE HEADLINE: Mark Emmert once again suggests paying players would doom college sports
THE SYNOPSIS: Six years later, players are about to earn money off their own name, image and likeness.  With the begrudging approval of the NCAA.

2013

THE HEADLINE: Johnny Manziel’s angry tweet was fueled by a… parking ticket?
THE SYNOPSIS: What do we always say?  Johnny Football gonna Johnny Football, y’all.

2010

THE HEADLINE: Dr. Lou: Notre Dame should join Big Ten
THE SYNOPSIS: A decade later, many observers align with  Holtz’s opinion.  Except for those whose opinions matter most.  Ya know, the ones who reside in South Bend.

2009

THE HEADLINE: Jim Harbaugh Steers Around the NFL Question
THE SYNOPSIS: On Jan. 7, 2011, Harbaugh officially left Stanford for the San Francisco 49ers.

NCAA Council formally approves six-week preseason model for football, which will begin July 13 for teams that start season Sept. 5

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The NCAA is proceeding with a significant step toward prepping for the 2020 college football season.

Earlier this month, it was confirmed that the NCAA Div. I Oversight Committee was crafting a plan that would shape the path college football programs would take to prepare for the upcoming season.  Last week, the NCAA announced that it has finalized its proposal for a preseason model for the sport.  However, the plan still needed the approval of the NCAA Division I Council.

Thursday, that expected thumbs-up came to fruition as the council has approved what will essentially be a six-week preseason for college football.  The NCAA writes that, “[a]ssuming a first game on Sept. 5, the model begins summer access activities July 13 and adds meetings and walk-throughs July 24.  Preseason practice begins Aug. 7.” Schools that open the seasoning Week 0 (Aug. 29), all of the dates would get seven days subtracted from them.  It’s unclear if teams whose first games are Sept. 3 will follow the Sept. 5 model or not.

The activities mentioned do not include the ongoing voluntary on-campus workouts.

As for the particulars?  The NCAA referred to its previous release as a guideline:

… student-athletes may be required to participate in up to eight hours of weight training, conditioning and film review per week (not more than two hours of film review per week) from July 13-23.

Then, from July 24 through Aug. 6, student-athletes may be required to participate in up to 20 hours of countable athletically related activities per week (not more than four hours per day) as follows:

— Up to eight hours per week for weight training and conditioning.
— Up to six hours per week for walk-throughs, which may include the use of a football.
— Up to six hours per week for meetings, which may include film review, team meetings, position meetings, one-on-one meetings, etc.
— During this 14-day period, student-athletes are required to get at least two days off.

The model does not make any adjustments to the legislated 29-day preseason practice period. In the previous example, the school’s preseason practice period would begin Aug. 7 with a five-day acclimatization period, followed by the opportunity for up to 25 on-field practices.