Michigan v Ohio State

Terrelle Pryor cleared in probe of loaner cars


You just can’t make this stuff up.  Well, you could, but it would be so unbelievable it wouldn’t be worth the effort.

Terrelle Pryor was one of five Ohio State players suspended for the first five games of the 2011 season for receiving impermissible benefits.  As it turns out, that case wasn’t the only off-field issue facing the quarterback.

According to the Columbus Dispatch, Pryor was pulled over for traffic violations three times in the past three years.  In each case, Pryor was driving a vehicle registered in the name of a car salesman or a car dealership where the salesman worked.

Ohio State, which was aware of only two of the incidents, told the Dispatch that they investigated the loaner vehicles and the compliance department determined that nothing untoward had occurred.  As for the other traffic stop that they weren’t aware of, the school said they will investigate that one to ensure that no NCAA bylaws were broken.

Reportedly, all three times Pryor was pulled over in the loaner vehicles, his vehicle was in the shop for repairs or he was simply out for a test drive.  One of the incidents occurred in October of 2008 and involved a 2004 GMC Denali.  The other two occurred within a week of each other this past March when Pryor was driving a 2009 Dodge.  The former vehicle was registered in the name of Aaron Kniffin, while the latter was registered to Auto Direct of Columbus.  Kniffin was employed by that dealership at the time Pryor was pulled over driving the Dodge.

Ohio State knew about Pryor’s use of the car while he had the engine in his own car replaced this past spring and was assured that every customer receives a loaner when extended repairs like that are necessary, Archie said.

Pryor told The Dispatch last night that he borrowed cars from the dealership only when his own was in for repairs and that he spoke with Kniffin only in those instances. As for the SUV he borrowed in 2008, Pryor said, “I wanted advice from some of my family and friends I trusted to see if it would be a good vehicle for me to maybe buy.”

Test driving or borrowing a car is not in itself a violation of NCAA rules. However, use of a car because of an athlete’s status could be considered an improper benefit.

Ohio State became aware of the possibility of NCAA violations when they received an anonymous letter this past July, which stated that members of the football program were trading autographs in exchange for the use of cars.  Of course, part of the probe that ended with the five-game suspensions involved the players receiving tattoos from a Columbus tattoo parlor in exchange for autographs and/or memorabilia.

About two dozen autographed jerseys hang inside Auto Direct’s office, including those from Pryor, running back Daniel Herron and receiver DeVier Posey. A number of autographs have been scribbled on the walls.

Pryor said he doesn’t remember the circumstances of him signing his jersey, but “I sign a lot of stuff for Buckeye fans – I don’t like to turn down fans. But I don’t do it to get any favors or discounts.

Pryor announced earlier this week that he would be returning for his senior season despite the suspension that will knock him out for nearly half the regular season.  Based on the reports coming out of Columbus involving Pryor, we’re not certain whether we should be offering our congratulations or condolences on that development.

Diagnosed with bovine leukemia, Bevo XIV retires immediately

Associated Press
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Turns out Steve Spurrier isn’t the only iconic college football figure to retire this week.

Texas announced Tuesday evening Bevo XIV has been diagnosed with bovine leukemia and has been retired to his pasture, effective immediately.

Bevo XIV missed Saturday’s stunning upset of then-No. 10 Oklahoma with what the school called a “life threatening” illness, and rumors circulated around the internet this week he had passed away.

Bevo XIV officially hangs up his horns with a 106-41 record with two national championship appearances.

There is no word at press time on a possible debut of Bevo XV.

Dabo Swinney won’t stop talking about “Clemsoning”

Dabo Swinney
Associated Press

Urban Dictionary defines “Clemsoning” as “the act of an inexplicably disappointing performance, usually within the context of a college football season.”

Clemson head coach Dabo Swinney was asked about the phenomenon following the Tigers’ destruction of Georgia Tech Saturday and promptly went off. The question, asked by ESPN’s David Hale, was in reference to Swinney’s program shaking the label – Saturday marked Clemson’s 34th straight win over an unranked opponent – but Swinney didn’t see it that way.

Armed with some new facts (Clemson SID Tim Bourret noted 50 teams have fallen as ranked opponents to unranked foes since the Tigers last did so on Nov. 19, 2011), Swinney again targeted the “Clemsoning” label.

“I think it’s an agenda. It’s just bias,” Swinney told the Charleston (S.C.) Post & Courier Tuesday. “People are uneducated. They’re just ignorant and lazy because they’re not looking at the facts. If they did, they’d be focused on other schools and not Clemson. They’d be dialed in on what Clemson has done. There aren’t three other schools in the country as consistent as Clemson, in all aspects.”

I hate to break it to you, Dabo: you are absolutely correct, but the term, as they say, has been coined.

Just go beat Florida State, beat South Carolina, win the ACC and win a national title and maybe Urban Dictionary will delete that pesky page out of a sign of respect.

Also, No. 5 Clemson hosts unranked Boston College on Saturday. This would be a very, very unfortunate time for the Tigers to suffer an upset.