John Swofford

ACC commish: ‘We need to be addressing the felons’


As he’s watched three schools from his conference — North Carolina, Georgia Tech and now Miami — come under NCAA scrutiny over the past year or so, ACC commissioner John Swofford is well aware of the issues facing college football.  Swofford’s also aware, as he stated last month, that something needs to be done to address the major issues facing the game rather than littering the rulebook with penny-ante minutia that merely serves to bog down an enforcement staff up to its neck in real problems.

Monday, Swofford reiterated that he’s in full agreement with what could be one the end results of an NCAA summit earlier this month: a streamlining of The Association’s bylaws.  In effect, Swofford and many, many others would like to see the NCAA’s enforcement focus shifted from the petty larceny of sending impermissible messages to recruits to, well, felons handing out millions and millions of dollars in impermissible benefits (allegedly) down in Coral Gables.

“Over the years what’s happened is, you try to put in a rule that keeps those that would cheat from cheating, and you end up trying to close every little loophole,”Swofford said Monday. “I think we need to be addressing the felons, if you will, as opposed to the jaywalkers, and get ourselves out of this maze of rules that are unenforceable.

“Although well-intended, I’m not sure whether somebody got a text on a day they weren’t supposed to get a text is a huge problem in reality.”

Swofford also stated that the NCAA needs to gain a greater understanding of how the “third-party involvement” of individuals such as agents, their runners and boosters “assist” in the commitment of major violations.  The problems at UNC were due in large part to agents/runners, while a rogue booster landed Miami in the mess they’re in now.

As for his own conference’s issues, Swofford labeled it disappointing that a quarter of his league has been under the NCAA’s enforcement microscope for the past 13 months.

“The last thing I want to see in our league are NCAA problems,” Swofford said. “So yes, whether it’s one or two or three, anytime they’re there, it’s disappointing. …

“When we have any particular school that has a significant NCAA issue, it’s disturbing, and we take it very seriously and expect the institutions to — which they do. Certainly, it’s something that’s not who we are, nor do we want it to become who we are.”

Mark Dantonio quickly tosses aside South Carolina discussion

Mark Dantonio

Michigan State has become a national power under the coaching of Mark Dantonio. The grizzled and confident coach has put together a master plan in East Lansing and has taken the Spartans to the top of the Big Ten along the way, capturing a Big Ten title and victories in the Cotton Bowl and Rose Bowl as well as in-state dominance over the Michigan Wolverines. Danotnio is preparing his Spartans to take on the Wolverines this week, but with the new vacancy opening up at South Carolina following the sudden retirement of Steve Spurrier, Dantonio has already been presented with the question about his thoughts on coaching at South Carolina.

He did not seem all that interested in discussing the vacancy when meeting with Michigan State media this morning.

“Coach Spurrier’s had an outstanding career there, it’s alma mater, and we’re here to talk about Michigan,” Dantonio said when asked about it today. Video below from the Big Ten Network

Dantonio played defensive back for the Gamecocks in the mid 1970s, which helps make Dantonio an interesting name to mention in any coaching future discussion out of Columbia. While Dantonio may have played at South Carolina for Jim Carlen, Dantonio grew up in Ohio and has coached the bulk of his career within Ohio and the Big Ten. He is also one win away from picking up his 100th career coaching victory, 81 of which have come at Michigan State.

Dan Patrick: Spurrier brought personality to the SEC

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South Carolina head coach Steve Spurrier is stepping down as head coach of the Gamecocks, and that has the college football world reflecting on the impact he has had on the game of college football. Spurrier’s quips at rivals and revolutionary thoughts on where the sport has been heading were always on the mark, even when his team’s performance on the field was not.

Dan Patrick shared his reaction to the news of Spurrier retiring today on The Dan Patrick Show (simulcast on NBC Sports Network). As many have already suggested, Spurrier’s wit and charm brought a refreshing personality to the SEC.