Bobby Petrino

Arkansas Police releases second report on Petrino accident

9 Comments

Last Friday, Arkansas State Police requested further questioning and a detailed report from Capt. Lance King, the officer who drove Arkansas head coach Bobby Petrino to the hospital following the coach’s motorcycle accident last Sunday.

Three days later, Capt. King’s report has been released as athletic director Jeff Long continues to mull over what punishment, if any, Petrino should be administered for lying about the presence of football employee Jessica Dorrell at the crash, as well as a possible “previous inappropriate relationship” with her.

Below is Capt. King’s narrative of the incident, courtesy of ArkansasSports360. We’ll have more on this later, but there are a few quick things worth pointing out.

(Since y’all love bullet points)

  • The release from the Arkansas State Police states King did not violate any state law, nor was it part of any internal investigation; it was merely “prepared as a means to be responsive to questions raised by representatives of the public.”
  • King’s report was given to Arkansas athletic director Jeff Long.
  • As was reportedly before, King has worked pre-game and game-day assignments with the football coach for the past two years. However, there is no permanent security detail assigned by the Arkansas State Police to the football coach.

On Sunday, April 1, 2012, I spent the entire afternoon with my wife working in our yard.

At approximately 6:15 P.M, I left my residence to go to Wal-Mart Neighborhood Market, located at Crossover and Mission Boulevard in Fayetteville, to pick up a jar of spaghetti sauce and a pound of lunch meat.
While at the Neighborhood Market, at approximately 6:30 P.M, I was contacted on my cell phone by Troop L Sergeant Gabe Weaver who informed me of a motorcycle accident on Arkansas State Highway 16 in Madison County in the community of Crosses.  I believe that Sergeant Weaver contacted me with his cell phone.
Sergeant Weaver stated that the rider of the motorcycle had departed the scene in a private vehicle en route to the hospital.  Sergeant Weaver said that Troop L Dispatch took the license number of the motorcycle from a witness and ran an ownership check on this license which returned to Arkansas Football Coach Bobby Petrino.
I then called Coach Petrino’s phone from my cell phone and left him a message.  This message said, I don’t even know if this is your number anymore, but your motorcycle has been involved in an accident and I wanted to call and check on you.  I told him if he needed any assistance to give me a call back.
I was called back in approximately one to three minutes by an unidentified female.
This person said that Coach Petrino had been in a motorcycle accident and was hurt and was headed to the emergency room.  This person asked if I could meet them at the parking lot located at Crossover Road and Highway 16 in order to take Coach Petrino to the hospital.  This person told me that they were in Elkins and headed toward Fayetteville. This person also told me that they were driving a white Jeep Cherokee.
I told this person that I was headed that way from the intersection of Highways 45 and 265.
I then contacted my supervisor, ASP Highway Patrol Major Les Braunns, and informed him of this situation.  He told me to keep him apprised and thoroughly investigate the accident. Major Braunns told me to make sure to conduct a thorough investigation and include all information concerning details of the accident. I told Major Braunns I would.
I was then called again by the female caller who asked me where I was and I told her that I saw their car in a parking lot and I was seconds away.
I pulled up on the parking lot approximately ten feet away from the white Cherokee and observed a white female helping Coach Petrino out of the passenger side rear of the car.
I assisted Coach Petrino into the front seat of my car and put a seat belt on him.
Coach Petrino had visible injuries.  He was covered with scrapes and cuts and had blood and had swelling around his face and head.  He was complaining of neck trouble.  He was hardly able to speak, only groaning.
I then told Coach Petrino that I would get him to the Washington Regional Hospital emergency room as fast and safely as I could.  Coach Petrino asked me if I thought he had broken his neck.  I told Coach Petrino that he was breathing, not bleeding excessively and not paralyzed, so he was probably going to be all right.
Before departing the scene, I verbally provided my cell phone number to the white female who I think put it in her phone.  I told her to call me tomorrow and I would have a trooper contact her for an interview.  I was at this location approximately one minute.
This white female had blond hair and I think was dressed in jeans.  She showed no sign of any injuries.  I had never seen this person before in my life.
I pulled off the parking lot with my blue lights activated headed to Washington Regional Medical Center emergency room.
I drove quickly, but safely, north on Crossover Road.  Again, I told Coach Petrino that we were headed to Washington Regional Hospital and he told me that was not where he needed to go.  He said he wanted to go the Physicians Specialty Hospital.  I told him that I had never heard of this hospital and he said that it was on Joyce Street.  He said that Dr. Arnold worked at the hospital and was going to meet him there.
I asked Coach Petrino if he was sure that Doctor Arnold was going to meet him there and he said that he had called him prior to me picking him up.
I told Coach Petrino that he would have to give me directions to this hospital, which he did.
During this short (four to five mile) commute Coach Petrino did nothing but groan in pain for the entire ride.  He said nothing about the accident except that a gust of wind blew him off the road.  It was obvious that he was in a lot of pain.  He kept saying that he thought he had broken his neck.
Upon arrival to the hospital, I pulled up to the door as Coach Petrino’s phone rang.  He told me that it was Becky (Mrs. Petrino) calling.  He handed the phone to me and I told her that Coach Petrino had been involved in a motorcycle wreck and was injured.  I told her that he was at the Physicians Specialty emergency room.   I told her that she needed to get down there.
The medical staff took Coach Petrino out of my car and took him into the hospital where they began treating him.
I then talked on the cell phone to Sergeant Gabe Weaver who had been waiting at Washington Regional Hospital.  He arrived at my location in a few minutes.
Sergeant Weaver and I stood around talking until Mrs. Petrino and several family members arrived.  The first to arrive was Mrs. Petrino, Nick Petrino, his son and Coach Paul Petrino’s wife (unknown name).  I believe that Matt Summer, an athletic trainer, was already there.  I talked to Matt about Coach Petrino complaining about possible neck injuries.
I was then contacted on my cell phone by Dr. Arnold. Dr. Arnold said that he was north bound at the Bobby Hopper Tunnel on I-540 and had been in Fort Smith at a little league game.  I told him about Coach Petrino being in pain and about his injured neck.  I told Dr. Arnold that I hope I didn’t cause any further injury by transporting Coach Petrino myself and not calling an ambulance.  I told him that I felt that time was an issue and he said that he thought I had done the right thing.
After fifteen minutes or so, an X-ray person came out of the X-ray room and asked if I was Lance and I said yes.  He said that Coach Petrino was very restless and asked if I along with Mrs. Petrino would stay in the room.  He said that it would help him do his job better.  I stayed in the room several minutes with Mrs. Petrino then exited. I do not remember speaking to Coach Petrino during this time.
After visiting with Sergeant Weaver a few more minutes, Sergeant Weaver asked me about where the Petrino’s wanted the motorcycle towed.  I asked Mrs. Petrino and she asked if it could be towed to her home and that she had left the garage open.   I left the hospital a short time later and traveled back to my home for supper.
At approximately 9:00 P.M, I was contacted by cell phone by Matt Summers.  He said that Coach Petrino had asked about me and wished me to come by and see him if I could.  I then left my residence and traveled to back to the hospital.
I walked back into the hospital room and Coach Petrino was lying in a bed with family members about.  His face was very swollen, his eyes were shut and he was still covered with blood.  He seemed to be going in and out of consciousness.  He appeared to be under a heavy influence of pain medication.  He barely opened his eyes, then thanked me for taking him to the hospital and then fell back to sleep.  I was in the room with Mrs. Petrino for most of the time.  I was in this room approximately three to four minutes.  I also told him that a trooper would be coming by to ask him some questions about the accident.  He asked if I would be with the trooper, and I told him if he wanted I could be.  He asked me to please call first and I agreed.  I left the hospital and traveled home where I remained until going to work the next morning.
Before leaving, Mrs. Petrino asked me who transported Coach Petrino to the hospital and I told her that I didn’t know, but I had given one of them my cell number and they should call me tomorrow.  She asked me to get their names, so she could thank them for their help.
On 04/02/12, at approximately noon, I received a phone call from a man who identified himself as Benjamin Williams.  Mr. Williams said that he was from Ozark, AR and he was one of the people who brought Coach Petrino to the hospital.  He said that he had his wife drop him off en-route to Fayetteville at a store or restaurant because he couldn’t stand looking at Coach Petrino’s injuries.  He also provided me the name of his girlfriend, Jody Diane Stewart, who was driving, and told me that that he hoped Coach Petrino and his lady friend were okay.  I told him that someone would be contacting him and also said that the Petrino family wanted to know his name so they could do something nice for them.  I said that maybe they will send him some razorback stuff and he said good, because he had a house full of kids.  I did not ask him anything about the “lady friend” knowing that an ASP trooper or investigator would be interviewing him soon.  He also said that they did not know or recognize Coach Petrino due to his injuries.  He said they were just trying to help a person out.
I then emailed Major Braunns and requested that he give me a call when he had a few minutes.  I left the office to get an ASP fitness test physical from my doctor in Fayetteville.
While at the doctor’s office, I was called by Major Braunns. I informed him of Mr. William’s call and he said that we would get someone down there to interview him and the other occupants of the vehicle.  I also told Major Braunns that a trooper was going by the hospital to interview Coach Petrino later that afternoon.
I then traveled back to my office and at approximately 3:00 P.M, I telephoned Coach Petrino and left a message that the investigating trooper would like to come by talk to him about the accident and he didn’t call me back.
Thinking that he might be in surgery or unable to speak on the phone, I contacted Arkansas Director of Football Mark Robinson and asked for Matt Summer’s cell phone number.  Mark Robinson gave me Summer’s cell phone number and I called him.
I asked him if he was still with Coach Petrino at the hospital and he said that he was at the Broyles Complex. I asked him if he knew if Coach Petrino was being treated or in surgery because I could not reach him on the phone and he said that he didn’t know.  We spoke a minute or so about injuries and he said that he really have any information about that and we terminated our phone conversation.  I told him that I would contact Dr. Arnold and ask him and he told me that he thought Dr. Arnold was in surgery all day.
I then called Dr. Arnold’s cell phone to inquire about Coach Petrino’s availability.  The phone was not answered and I left a message.  At approximately 6:00 P.M, Dr. Arnold called me back and I think told me that he had been in surgery all day.
At approximately 3:30 to 4:00 PM, I was called by Coach Petrino on my cell phone.  I asked him if he was going to be available for an interview with the investigating trooper.  He asked what the trooper would need and I told him the trooper would need his driver’s license, vehicle registration and insurance information.  I told him the trooper would ask him specific questions about the accident such as direction of travel, what caused the crash and any passenger information.  He asked if he could be interviewed the following day after he was released from the hospital.  I said that would probably be fine and asked if 3:00 P.M. was all right.  Coach Petrino said that football practice starts around 3:00 and could we talk to him after practice.  I told him that I couldn’t believe based on his condition that he would be able to run a practice, and he said that he was going to run it from the press box.  We spoke about his condition and terminated the phone call.  Coach Petrino asked if passenger information was required and I said that all we need to know is the passenger’s name and address.  I told him that we had been getting phone calls from people who had said there was a passenger on the rear of the motorcycle and if we didn’t get a name, the report would state unidentified white female.  I didn’t ask him the name and he didn’t ask me to keep her name off the report.  I knew he would be interviewed shortly.
I telephoned my supervisor, Major Braunns, and he advised me to allow the troopers to interview Coach Petrino without my presence, and I agreed.
I had no further contact with anyone involved the rest of the day and spent the evening with my wife at home.
On 04/03/12, at approximately 9:00 A.M, I was contacted by my supervisor, Major Les Braunns, who requested that I travel to Arkansas State Police Headquarters in Little Rock to brief the command staff on this crash.
I traveled to Arkansas State Police Headquarters and met with Colonel J.R. Howard, Lt. Colonel Tim K’Nuckles, Major Les Braunns and Lt. Steve Coppinger and briefed them on the investigation.   During this meeting they played a recording of the 911 tape.  This was the first time I heard it.
I then traveled back to my residence in Fayetteville.
On 04/03/12, at approximately 6:30 P.M, I was contacted by Sergeant Gabe Weaver who along with Trooper Josh Arnold had just left the Broyles Complex after an interview with Coach Petrino.
Sergeant Weaver told me that Coach Petrino cooperated with him and Trooper Arnold and provided them all the information that they requested.  Sergeant Weaver said that Coach Petrino walked them down the hallway at the Broyles Complex and introduced them to the passenger, who was identified as Jessica Dorrell, who was also interviewed.
I then contacted Major Braunns and related this information.  I also asked for permission to contact Coach Petrino to check on him and his injuries and he gave his approval.
At approximately 7:00 P.M, I called Coach Petrino’s cell phone and left him message to return my call.
At approximately 7:15 P.M, Coach Petrino called me back.  I had a short conversation with him asking about his health, thanked him for treating the troopers so well and letting him know the report would be released in several days.
On Thursday, at approximately 2:50 P.M, I called Coach Petrino and let him know that the ASP accident report would be released later this afternoon.  I have had no further contact with Coach Petrino.
I have friends employed at the University of Arkansas, including Chancellor Gearhart and his family.  During the entire time period documented in this memorandum, with the exception of those previously mentioned, I was not contacted in any manner by anyone at the University of Arkansas, except Kevin Trainer, who emailed me and thanked me for hooking him up with ASP Media Specialist Bill Sadler.
In closing, at no time did I fail to provide information to my supervisor or involve myself in the accident investigation. I do not know Jessica Dorrell and I have never met her. Coach Petrino and I did not discuss any passenger information during transport to the hospital or otherwise.  I have a professional relationship with Coach Petrino and have never met with him or his family socially.  At no time was there any indication that Coach Petrino had been drinking or was intoxicated. He did not smell of alcoholic beverages. (End of King memorandum)

Hugh Freeze fuels Ole Miss win in Chick-fil-A Peach Bowl golf outing

Hugh Freeze
Chick-fil-A Peach Bowl Challenge
Leave a comment

It appears Ole Miss’ off-field issues laid bare for the country to see over the weekend had little or no impact on Hugh Freeze’s focus on a golf course.

At the 2016 Chick-fil-A Peach Bowl challenge in Greensboro, Ga., Freeze and his Ole Miss partner, former Rebel tight end Wesley Walls, pulled away from the field of 13 FBS head coaches and their partners to claim a two-shit win.  Moat impressive was how the Rebel duo pulled away as Freeze holed an 8-iron from 150 yards on the par-four 14th for an eagle, then the team proceeded to rip off four straight birdies to close out both the round and a trio of teams that finished at -11 –Georgia (Kirby Smart/David Dukes), Georgia Tech (Paul Johnson/Jon Barry), North Carolina State (Dave Doeren/Terry Harvey).

“The ball was jumping off my irons and I knew I hit it good,” Freeze said of the holed-out shot that jumpstarted the birdie binge. “Then Wesley said he thought he saw it disappear. I thought it was long but I started walking to the hole pretty fast and found out it went in. That’s when we thought we had a chance.”

Freeze’s heroics helped win his team $100,000, with that total being split evenly between endowed scholarships at the universities and foundations or charities of the coach’s choice.  Those heroics also kept the Georgia Tech team of Johnson and Barry from three-peating and winning the event for the fifth time in the last six years.

Below is how the rest of the field finished in the challenge as well as scholarship.charity money earned.

Screen Shot 2016-05-03 at 6.03.39 PM

‘Sometime this week or next week,’ ex-Miami TE Jerome Washington should sign with Rutgers

PISCATAWAY, NJ - NOVEMBER 16: Rutgers Scarlet Knights are wearing helmets with a stars and stripes logo in honor of Military Appreciation Day before the start of their game against the Cincinnati Bearcats at High Point Solutions Stadium on November 16, 2013 in Piscataway, New Jersey. (Photo by Rich Schultz /Getty Images)
Getty Images
Leave a comment

In mid-April, former Miami tight end Jerome Washington confirmed that Rutgers will be his likely transfer destination.  Three weeks later, that move is coming closer to fruition.

Speaking to nj.com, Washington stated that, when it comes to officially signing with the Scarlet Knights, “[h]opefully it’s sometime this week or next week.”  All indications are RU will send the required paperwork in short order to officially make Washington the newest member of first-year head coach Chris Ash‘s football program.

“I haven’t signed but they told me they have a scholarship offer for me,” Washington told the website. “And when I asked what I should say to schools recruiting me, they said I should say I’m not interested, which means I’m basically good to go. Coach Ash told my cousin that last week at the recruiting event.”

If Washington lands at RU, or any other FBS program, he’d have to sit out the 2016 season, but would then have two years of eligibility remaining beginning in 2017.

Washington, a rising sophomore, appeared in nine games in 2015 for the Hurricanes but did not record a statistic. He arrived at The U by way of Mercer County Community College.

In February, Washington announced that he would be transferring from Miami and continuing his playing career elsewhere.

Minnesota losing DL Mose Hall to transfer

MINNEAPOLIS, MN - NOVEMBER 15: The jersey and helmet of Jon Christenson #63 of the Minnesota Golden Gophers are seen during the third quarter of the game against the Ohio State Buckeyes on November 15, 2014 at TCF Bank Stadium in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The Buckeyes defeated the Golden Gophers 31-24. (Photo by Hannah Foslien/Getty Images)
Getty Images
Leave a comment

The transfer train continues its run down the tracks, with Minnesota the latest to see its roster hit with attrition.

As all the cool kids are doing these days, Mose Hall took to social media confirm a change in his current situation, announcing on Twitter that he has decided to transfer out of the Gophers football program. No reason was given for the defensive lineman’s departure.

Should Hall move on to another FBS program, he’d have to sit out the 2016 season. He’d then have three seasons of eligibility remaining beginning in 2017.

Hall was a three-star 2015 recruit rated as the No. 98 strongside defensive end by 247Sports.com.  He was also the No. 61 player at any position in the state of Alabama.

Last season as a true freshman, Hall took a redshirt.

Expansion rumblings once again swirling around Big 12

Matt Ritchey
Associated Press
9 Comments

Expansion in major college football has been in hibernation for a couple of years now, but it appears movement on that front could be imminent.  Or it could not.  One of the two.

Over the past 24 hours or so, a handful of stories have surfaced that, once again, have the speculation swirling around the Big 12 when it comes to that conference getting back to matching its numerical name.  From analytics to potential expansion candidates to the 800-pound Longhorn in the middle of the room, the Big 12’s annual spring meetings this week figure to at least begin — or, more specifically, continue — the process of settling the expansion/conference title game/league network issues that are all inextricably intertwined.

To wit:

— Monday, Big 12 commissioner Bob Bowlsby confirmed that in research performed by an analytics outfit hired by the league, a 12-team conference with an eight-game league schedule and a championship game is the best model for one of its teams qualifying for the college football playoff.  Right now, the Big 12 is the exact opposite of that model, with 10 teams, nine conference games and no title game.

According to Bowlsby, the first combination would increase a league’s chances of sending a team to the playoffs by five percent.  As Chuck Carlton of the Dallas Morning News asked, would that slight bump be enough to get everyone onboard with expansion and a title game?

“Some would say we want every advantage we can get,” Bowlsby said. “Others may say it’s not enough to blow up a good scheduling model.”

From Carlton’s report:

Bowlsby said the Big 12 is scheduled to receive “two major reports” in Irving. In addition to information on the title game, Navigate will examine scheduling models for a 10-, 12- and 14-team conference and the variables involved.

In February, Bowlsby said he hoped to have an answer to the expansion question, one way or the other, this summer.  Just how close Bowlsby gets to that timeline will depend on how things go in Phoenix this week.

— Boise State, BYU, Cincinnati, Houston, Memphis and UCF have all been mentioned as potential candidates if the Big 12 opts to expand.  According to the Memphis Commercial Appeal, the UofM has been lobbying the conference for inclusion in a next round of expansion if it comes.

University of Memphis president M. David Rudd sent a promotional publication – highlighting the finer points of the city and its major university – to University of Texas president Dr. Gregory Fenves in December, showcasing the U of M as a possible Big 12 expansion candidate.

Rudd said the publication, entitled “Memphis Soul of a City,” captures “the passion and proud history of Tiger athletics including a historic run by our football program.”

The Memphis publication highlights the city’s top Fortune 500 companies, its overall attributes and the U of M’s attributes, including its recent athletic accomplishments, particularly the turnaround by the football program. Tiger football has gone 19-7 the past two seasons.

— And, finally,that 800-pound Longhorn we spoke of earlier.

It’s long been believed that Texas is not in favor of expanding the conference, especially at the expense of folding its Longhorn Network into a conference-wide network, with Texas Tech and TCU, for their own reasons, following in lock-step with the state’s flagship institution.  According to a report from the Cincinnati Enquirer, the conference is one vote shy of garnering enough support to expand.

It’s believed seven of the 10 schools favor expansion. But Big 12 bylaws call for a super majority vote of 75 percent (so at least eight schools) to make a major change. Texas is believed to be influencing Texas Tech’s and Texas Christian’s decisions to also be reluctant to expansion.

Texas Tech has long fallen in line with Texas. Both are public universities that have been in the same league together since 1956, when they were in the Southwest Conference. Texas and Texas Tech were founding members of the Big 12 in 1996.

TCU is believed to be following Texas’ lead because the conference’s power broker reportedly helped the Horned Frogs get into the Big 12 four years ago.

In other words, we’re right back to where we’ve been on multiple occasions in the past: as Texas goes, so goes Big 12 expansion.  Or doesn’t go, as the case may be.

UPDATED 6:38 p.m. ET: If you want an idea as to Texas’ thought process at the moment, I think this sentence pretty much tells you everything you need to know.