Mike Gundy on proposed rule: Like asking basketball to take away shot clock

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The NCAA’s Football Rules Committee proposed a rule change that would prevent offenses from snapping the football for the first ten seconds on the play clock. The rule was recommended with player safety in mind, according to the rules committee, but coaches thriving on up-tempo play styles have not been silent with their reactions to the proposed rule. On Thursday it was Oklahoma State’s Mike Gundy who took to Twitter to voice his frustrations.

“The no huddle, fast tempo style has changed the game of [college football],” Gundy said on his Twitter profile. “Our sport has exploded in popularity with high scoring games and packed stadiums.”

Gundy sees the proposed rule as a way of completely changing the game, which may be a tad extreme. The basics of the game are not impacted in any way by this proposed timing and substitution rule. The field is the same length, the point values have not changed, and each team gets 11 players aside. But tell that to Gundy.

“The 10-second rule is like asking basketball to take away the shot clock,” Gundy says. “Boring!”

Know what else is boring? Lopsided games with one team racking up 40-50 points more than their counterparts. This is not about player safety so much as it is about keeping the game competitive.

The more accurate comparison would probably be if he rules committee suggested doing away with the play clock, but the point is Gundy is another coach who is not supportive of the proposal. The proposal is fair for criticism. It is nowhere near perfect and it, like many proposed rules, is not without its flaws. If the idea is really to make the game more competitive, then it makes sense to find ways to allow defenses to get back on an even playing field, but it is also unfair to criticize teams that have managed to put together offensive styles that give their team a schematic advantage.

“College [f]ootball is constantly evolving,” Gundy said. “Coaches have to make adjustments based on their team, their talents and their opponents.”

Keep that last line in your memory banks, just in case the rules do change and have a negative impact on Oklahoma State’s offense. After all, as Gundy says, teams have to make adjustments. Those that do will have a higher probability for success.

The good news for all of the coaches ripping the proposal is there is probably a slim chance at best the rule will be approved and become standard for the upcoming football season.

NC State adds Division 2 graduate transfer kicker

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It’s possible Dave Doeren‘s life would feel completely different right now if he had a better kicker in 2016.

In this reality, Doeren is 25-26 after four seasons in Raleigh, coming off back-to-back 7-6 seasons following his 8-5 breakthrough of 2014. But if his Wolfpack could kick last year, Doeren is most likely riding high after an 8-4 regular season buoyed by a win over Clemson in Death Valley. Because not only did NC State lose that game on a late field goal whiff, the Pack also suffered a 33-30 loss to East Carolina in which it endured two missed field goals.

NC State’s two kickers combined to hit only 9-of-17 tries last fall, good for 121st nationally, and ranked 104th with a 93.3 percent conversion rate on 45 extra points. And the situation wasn’t getting better this spring.

To rectify that situation, NC State announced the addition of kicker Carson Wise. A graduate transfer from Division II Carson-Newman, Wise will have two years of availability for the Wolfpack.

Wise connected on 21-of-31 field goals and 97-of-101 PATs last season, numbers that, on their face, do not represent massive changes from what NC State posted last season. But Doeren is banking on Wise as a solution for NC State in 2017.

“I’m excited to have Carson join the family,” Doeren said in a statement. “He is a talented player who should be a great addition to our special teams as we look for him to handle our field goal and kickoff duties this fall.”

Arkansas House votes to exempt sporting venues from expanded gun law

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Remember how we talked about it’s impossible to follow sports and ignore politics? Not long after John Swofford released a statement on how a North Carolina law would effect ACC sporting events, the Arkansas legislature passed a bill that will do the same in the SEC.

The Arkansas House voted 71-20 to allow its state colleges and universities to exempt themselves from a law that greatly expands venues permitting concealed-carry handguns. Until the passing of SB724 today, guns would have been permissible inside Razorback Stadium, among other places.

SEC commissioner Greg Sankey released a statement earlier this week urging state lawmakers to remove sporting venues from the bill. “HB 1249 creates concerns for the Southeastern Conference and its member institutions,” he said. “It remains our collective desire to provide a safe environment for student-athletes, coaches, officials and fans, and will continue to closely monitor the status of this legislation.”

Passing the bill was made more complicated by the involvement of the NRA, according to Rep. Jimmy Gateway.

The bill must now head back to the Senate before it can receive final approval from Governor Asa Hutchinson.

John Swofford releases statement on North Carolina repeal of HB2

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It’s pretty much impossible to keep politics out of the sports page today. SEC commissioner Greg Sankey was forced to release a statement on Tuesday urging Arkansas state legislators to exempt Razorbacks sporting venues from a bill that would greatly expand areas allowing concealed-carry handguns, and now ACC commissioner John Swofford has been forced to wade back into political waters.

North Carolina’s state legislature brokered a deal Thursday with new governor Roy Cooper to repeal House Bill 2, the controversial law requiring persons within Tar Heel state borders to use public bathrooms matching their gender at birth. The “bathroom bill” cost the state a reported $3.76 billion in revenue, and some of that lost revenue related directly to college football.

Following the NCAA’s lead of revoking the state’s championship event hosting privileges due to HB2, the ACC moved its football championship game from Charlotte to Orlando (the men’s basketball tournament was previously booked for Brooklyn), a move that cost the conference itself money as well.

Thursday’s repeal of HB2 is more complicated than simply yanking the bathroom bill (this is where I’ll direct you to a much more appropriate place to digest the political news of the hour than a college football blog) and, as such, Swofford’s statement is appropriately nuanced.

The ACC is still undecided where this December’s title game will be played, and Swofford will kick that decision upstairs to the league’s presidents.

Oklahoma OL Christian Daimler to pursue graduate transfer

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Oklahoma offensive tackle Christian Daimler will pursue a transfer, according to a message posted to his Twitter account Thursday.

As a fifth-year senior, Daimler qualifies as a graduate transfer and will be eligible immediately. “I could not be more excited about what my future holds,” Daimler wrote. “Wherever I end up I know that I will always be a Sooner and for that am I so proud. This University [sic] will forever remain close to my heart. Boomer Sooner.”

If that name does not immediately ring a bell, you are forgiven. Daimler appeared in three games as a Sooner, all over last season.

Hailing from Houston, Daimler, who stands 6-foot-7 and is listed at 321 pounds, was a 3-star recruit when he signed with Oklahoma over Texas A&M, Arizona State and Colorado, among others.