Suspended FSU QB charged with misdemeanor battery

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A member of the Florida State football program officially has a legal issue with which to deal.

ESPN.com‘s Mark Schlabach is reporting that De’Andre Johnson has been charged with misdemeanor battery by the state attorney’s office of Florida.  According to reports at the time, it’s alleged that an unidentified female — well, unidentified to everybody but the Tallahassee Police Department — was punched by the quarterback at a local drinking establishment.

Schlabach added that the charge was filed “after reviewing video of incident from bar security cameras.”  An arrest warrant has been issued for Johnson, who has yet to turn himself in on the charge.

It was announced last Thursday that Johnson had been indefinitely suspended from the football program.

A four-star member of the Seminoles’ 2015 recruiting class. Johnson was rated by Rivals.com as the No. 12 dual-threat quarterback in the country and the No. 39 player at any position in the state of Florida. He was an early enrollee who participated in spring practice.

With the addition of graduate transfer Everett Golson and the presence of 2014 backup Sean Maguire, Johnson was likely looking at a redshirt season even before his off-field issue surfaced.

UPDATED 5:55 p.m. ET: Johnson has turned himself in to the Leon County Jail and remains in jail as of this update in lieu of a $500 bond.  According to the Tallahassee Democrat, the alleged victim met with state’s attorney Willie Meggs, who will prosecute the case, on Tuesday.  The woman, who still had a black eye when she met with Meggs, is described as beign cooperative with authorities.

Michigan State sees one punter leave team, another pull his name from transfer portal

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It was a busy day personnel-wise on the punting front for the Michigan State football program.

Last year, Bryce Baringer placed his name into the NCAA transfer database.  This week, it was reported that Baringer had pulled his name out of the portal, an indication that the punter has decided to remain as part of the Michigan State football team.

Conversely, Michigan State confirmed that Jack Bouwmeester is no longer part of the Spartans football team.  According to mlive.com, Bouwmeester has returned to his native Australia.  No reason was given for the development.  It’s unclear at this point whether the move is permanent.

Baringer began his collegiate career at Illinois.  After taking a redshirt as a true freshman in 2017, Baringer transferred to Michigan State prior to the start of the 2018 season.  Because of injuries that year to the two punters ahead of him on the depth chart, Baringer played in four games.  In that action, he averaged 32.4 yards on 15 punts.  Four of those punts landed inside the 20-yard line.

Mlive.com wrote that “Bouwmeester, who Michigan State found through ProKick Australia, was the program’s first incoming punter recruit to land a scholarship since [Jake] Hartbarger.” Bouwmeester was a three-star 2019 signee, rated as the No. 9 punter in the country.  He took a redshirt as a true freshman after not playing in any games.

Hartbarger served as the primary punter for Michigan State last season.  As a sixth-year senior, Hartbarger’s eligibility has expired.

Baringer is one of three punters currently on the Michigan State roster.  The others are redshirt junior walk-on Tyler Hunt and redshirt freshman walk-on Evan Morris.  Hunt was the second of the two punters injured during that 2018 season.  Hunt, who replaced the injured Hartbarger that year, started five games, punting 36 times for an average of 40.1 yards per.

College Football in Coronavirus Quarantine: On this day in CFT history

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The sports world, including college football, has essentially screeched to a halt as countries around the world battle the coronavirus pandemic. As such, there’s a dearth of college football news as spring practices have all but been canceled at every level of the sport. And there’s even some concern that the health issue could have an impact on the 2020 college football campaign.

In that vein, we thought it might be fun to go back through the CollegeFootballTalk archives and take a peek at what transpired in the sport on this date.

So, without further ado — ok, one further ado — here’s what happened in college football on April 1, by way of our team of CFT writers both past and present.

(P.S.: If any of our readers have ideas on posts they’d like to read during this hiatus, leave your suggestions in the comments section.  Mailbag, maybe?)

2018

THE HEADLINE: Mark Emmert: We can’t pay football and basketball players because it would kill non-revenue sports
THE SYNOPSIS: Two years later, players are on the verge of being allowed to earn money off of their names, images and likenesses… and saving schools the “pain” of having to pay them.

2017

THE HEADLINE: Alabama fans kick Deshaun Watson out of Tuscaloosa bar
THE SYNOPSIS: This offseason story developed after Watson engineered a last-second Clemson win in the College Football Playoff title game win over Alabama.  Initially, it was reported that former Tide linebacker Ryan Anderson was part of the crowd of Crimson Neanderthals hassling Watson.  Instead, it turned out that Anderson was merely trying to diffuse the situation.

2016

THE HEADLINE: Three Iowa State players rescue woman from drowning on spring break trip
THE SYNOPSIS: Anthony LazardJack SpreenJoe Doran were true heroes on this day three years ago.  They jumped in and saved the life of a 22-year-old woman who drove her car into Laguna Madre Bay as the trio watched and then sprung into action. “That car completely sank in less than a minute and if not for them jumping into the water and pulling the driver out, she would most certainly have drowned,” officer Michael Schiltz said at the time.

THE HEADLINE: Art Briles named in federal sexual assault lawsuit against Baylor
THE SYNOPSIS: Even a half-decade later, the stench surrounding Briles is still strong.  Despite said stench, Briles is still serving as a high school head coach. For a program with its own off-field issues.

2014

THE HEADLINE: Texas AD: ‘I don’t see us focusing on’ renewing A&M rivalry
THE SYNOPSIS: Texas A&M left for the SEC in 2012.  Since then, at various points, each side has claimed to want a renewal of the in-state rivalry.  Of late, though? “[F]rom our standpoint it’s really not a big deal to us, and you know, we’ve kind of moved on,” A&M athletic director Ross Bjork said in November of last year.

2012

THE HEADLINE: Female kicker falls short in Hokies tryout
THE SYNOPSIS: Lauren Luttrell was part of a 10-person kicking tryout at Virginia Tech.  She failed, though, to advance to the final three.

2011

THE HEADLINE: That’ll Bruin your day: projected OL starter fractures ankle
THE SYNOPSIS: I just liked the punny UCLA headline.  Your mileage may vary.  A lot.

2010

THE HEADLINE: Kelly on Irish: ‘We stink right now’
THE SYNOPSIS: A little reverse psychology by Brian Kelly? Notre Dame went on to an 8-5 record in Kelly’s first season. Two years later, they won a school-record 12 games en route to a national championship game appearance versus Alabama.

2009

THE HEADLINE: MEYER HAS NO PROBLEM WITH CONTROVERSIAL LINEMAN*
THE SYNOPSIS: Urban Meyer.  A player with an off-field issue.  Lather.  Rinse. Repeat.

(*Yes, back in the day, we used to scream out our headlines at our readers in all-caps. The move to NBC a couple of months later mercifully ended that practice.)

Anonymous FBS athletic director: ‘If there’s no season, we will be f*****’

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If you didn’t realize how important college football is to an athletic department’s bottom line, this should highlight it.

In the midst of the spreading coronavirus pandemic, some connected to the game of college football are decidedly pessimistic that the upcoming season will be played. Others are expressing cautious optimism. For now, at least.

Brett McMurphy of The Stadium conducted a survey of 130 athletic directors with FBS programs, with 112 of them participating. According to McMurphy, the ADs “were asked to rank their optimism on the upcoming season being played from ‘1’ (will not be played) to ’10’ (definitely will be played).”

Not a single AD gave less than a “5” in response, meaning everyone who responded, at least at this time, feels there’s at least a 50-50 chance the season will go off as planned. A slight majority of respondents (51%) assigned either the numbers seven or eight in McMurphy’s survey. One-quarter of them were decidedly optimistic with either a nine or 10 as a response. Most of that optimism was on the part of Group of Five programs that, already financially reeling from the distilled NCAA’s revenue distribution last month, desperately need a college football season to be played.

If the college football season is to start on time — the first games are scheduled for Aug. 29 — what would be the absolute latest teams could start reconvening and prepping for the 2020 campaign? The answer you get depends on the individual you ask. Some would say early June at the absolute latest. Others have said the middle of July.

So, what if the season is canceled? Completely?

“If there’s no season, we will be f*****,” an anonymous AD told McMurphy.

A tweet from Ross Dellenger of SI.com very plainly illustrates how reliant athletic departments are on revenue from college football.

Suffice to say, if the 2020 college football season is completely wiped out, non-revenue sports will be cut. Lots of them will be shuttered, more than likely.

The good news, such as it is, is that the powers-that-be in the sport will go to great lengths to save the 2020 college football season. In fact, one report earlier today suggested that the season could start as late as January of next year. How that would work with players who are eligible for the 2021 NFL Draft would have to be worked out, as would myriad other issues.

While it’s way too early to form a concrete opinion, there’s little doubt that all connected to the sport will exhaust every option to save the 2020 college football season. And, if the season is canceled? It’ll mean we all have a helluva lot more to worry about than sports.

Four-star 2017 Maryland DB Deon Jones transfers to Boston College

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As they have a handful of times this offseason, Boston College is on the positive end of a college football player seeking a fresh start.

In mid-February, Deon Jones signaled his intent to leave Maryland by entering his name into the NCAA transfer database.  A month and a half later, the defensive back signaled his intention to transfer into the Boston College football program.

Via Twitter, of course.

It should be noted that, as of right now, Boston College hasn’t acknowledged Jones’ addition to the football roster.

In announcing his decision to leave Maryland, Jones indicated that he will graduate from the university in May.  That will allow him to play immediately for the Boston College football team this coming season.

Not only will Jones be eligible to play immediately at another FBS school in 2020, though, he will have another season of eligibility he can use in 2021 as well.

A four-star member of the Terrapins’ 2017 recruiting class, Jones was rated as the No. 3 player in the state of Maryland regardless of position. Only one signee in the Terps’ class that year, running back Anthony McFarland, was rated higher than Jones.

After taking a redshirt as a true freshman, Jones appeared in 21 games the past two seasons. He started six of those contests, with all six of those starts coming this past season.

Jones will finish his time with Maryland football with 51 tackles, two forced fumbles, one tackle for loss and one pass defensed.

Since the calendar flipped to 2020, Boston College has added at least three transfers to its football roster.  The other two are:

  • Notre Dame quarterback Phil Jurkovec (HERE)
  • Buffalo defensive lineman Chibueze Onwuka (HERE)

Additionally, BC’s leading receiver reversed course and pulled his name from the portal in late January.