Joe Paterno and his wife Sue greet supporters outside their home in State College in still image taken from video

Paterno family blasts NCAA, Penn State in statement


C’mon, you knew it was coming.

As part of the sanctions levied by the NCAA against Penn State Monday morning, the Nittany Lions football program was forced to vacate all 112 wins from 1998-2011.  111 of those wins belonged to Joe Paterno, meaning the deceased former head coach will officially be recognized as winning 298 games and hand over the title of winningest FBS coach to Florida State’s Bobby Bowden and his 377 wins.

And, as has ofttimes been the case throughout this sordid soap opera, the family of the late head coach has issued a statement addressing the latest development.

In large part, the family blasted the NCAA, stating that the association has become the latest entity to “defame the legacy and contributions of a great coach and educator without any input from our family or those who knew him best.”  The statement went on to say that “[p]unishing past, present and future students of the University because of Sandusky’s crimes does not serve justice.”

It also didn’t serve as justice to Sandusky’s victims for high-ranking school officials to actively engage in a cover-up that ultimately led to additional victims at the hands of a convicted serial pedophile, but whatever I guess.

It’s understandable that the Paterno family would want to protect the legacy of their husband/father/grandfather/etc.; what’s not understandable is the family, with each passing statement, publicly placing more importance on that tattered legacy than they seemingly do the victims.

The family also used the statement as a platform to blast Penn State for accepting the historic sanctions “without requiring a full due process hearing before the Committee on Infractions.”

Anyway, here’s the Paterno family’s latest attempt to salvage what’s left of the coach’s legacy:

“Sexual abuse is reprehensible, especially when it involves children, and no one starting with Joe Paterno condones or minimizes it. The horrific acts committed by Jerry Sandusky shock the conscience of every decent human being. How Sandusky was able to get away with his crimes for so long has yet to be fully understood, despite the claims and assertions of the Freeh report.

The release of the Freeh report has triggered an avalanche of vitriol, condemnation and posthumous punishment on Joe Paterno. The NCAA has now become the latest party to accept the report as the final word on the Sandusky scandal. The sanctions announced by the NCAA today defame the legacy and contributions of a great coach and educator without any input from our family or those who knew him best.

That the President, the Athletic Director and the Board of Trustees accepted this unprecedented action by the NCAA without requiring a full due process hearing before the Committee on Infractions is an abdication of their responsibilities and a breach of their fiduciary duties to the University and the 500,000 alumni. Punishing past, present and future students of the University because of Sandusky’s crimes does not serve justice. This is not a fair or thoughtful action; it is a panicked response to the public’s understandable revulsion at what Sandusky did.

The point of due process is to protect against this sort of reflexive action. Joe Paterno was never interviewed by the University or the Freeh Group. His counsel has not been able to interview key witnesses as they are represented by counsel related to ongoing litigation. We have had no access to the records reviewed by the Freeh group. The NCAA never contacted our family or our legal counsel. And the fact that several parties have pending trials that could produce evidence and testimony relevant to this matter has been totally discounted.

Unfortunately all of these facts have been ignored by the NCAA, the Freeh Group and the University.”

Randy Edsall not leaving Maryland without giving Buckeyes a fight

Cardale Jones
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If this is the last game Randy Edsall coaches at Maryland, at least he is making it count. Maryland may be down at the half, but the overmatched Terrapins are giving No. 1 Ohio State all it can handle it would seem. Ohio State holds a 21-14 lead on Maryland at the half, with big plays being the key.

Maryland struck first when Perry Hills connected to an open D.J. Moore down the middle of the field for a 52-yard touchdown and a 7-0 lead. Ohio State would battle back, switching up the quarterbacks between Cardale Jones and J.T. Barrett along the way. The Buckeyes ripped off three touchdowns, with Barrett and Ezekiel Elliott each running for one and Jones throwing for the third, to Braxton Miller. Up 21-7, all seemed to return to normal for the Buckeyes, but Maryland cut the lead to seven late in the first half.

Hills broke free for a 75-yard run from the Maryland 22-yard line all the way down to the Ohio State three, and he finsihed off the quick touchdown on the next play with a short touchdown run. So Maryland continues to linger, which appears to be a theme with Ohio State’s opponents this season.

Jones has completed 15 of 20 pass attempts for 195 yards and a touchdown for Ohio State. Barrett attempted just one pass, which was good for a 20-yard gain. Elliott has just 25 rushing yards on 11 attempts at the half.

Texas-sized upset? Longhorns stunning No. 10 Oklahoma in Red River Rivalry

Jerrod Heard
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Nobody could have seen this coming, even after throwing out the records. A week after being ambushed by TCU, Charlie Strong and his Texas Longhorns looked like a completely different team in the first quarter against No. 10 Oklahoma in the old Cotton Bowl. Texas holds a surprising 14-3 lead at the half.

Jerrod Heard completed a 24-yard touchdown pass to Marcus Johnson midway through the first quarter. The Longhorns made it 14-0 when a break went their way. Lorenzo Joe recovered a fumble in the end zone for a score to make it 14-0 after Oklahoma had fumbled away the ensuing kickoff after the first score.

Texas outgained Oklahoma in the first quarter, 133 yards to just 15, and at the half (169 yards to just 85). Oklahoma went three-and-out on each of its two drives, and the Sooners had to punt four times before being able to put a dent on the scoreboard with a short 21-yard field goal by Austin Seibert after a 12-play drive stalled at the Texas four-yard line. Meanwhile, Texas was building a double-digit lead.

Without a doubt, the first half of this game was the best half we have seen from Texas in a while. Can they keep it going and score what would be a significant upset to get our day started?