Governor Corbett

PA to file suit against NCAA over Penn State sanctions

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2013 will not be a year for turning corners in the aftermath of the Jerry Sandusky Scandal and Penn State.

Sports Illustrated‘s Pete Thamel reported Tuesday morning that the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania is planning to file a lawsuit against the NCAA to challenge the sanctions levied against Penn State over the summer in the wake of the Freeh Report. According to Thamel, Penn State is not involved in preparing the suit. An announcement was later confirmed for Wednesday, but no one fromPSU or the NCAA has commented on the matter.

Governor Tom Corbett (pictured) was Attorney General for Pennsylvania when his office began the investigation into allegations that Sandusky, a longtime Penn State assistant football coach, had sexually abused young boys. His role in the greater scope of the scandal has come under scrutiny as well, specifically for approving a $3 million grant for the Second Mile, Sandusky’s charity which he used as an avenue to meet his victims.

The news comes one day after Philadelphia Inquirer reported that there was a strong disagreement between Pennsylvania lawmakers and the NCAA over how Penn State’s $60 million fine, which was part of NCAA President Mark Emmert’s sanctions, should be spent.

“If you spend all of that money in Pennsylvania, it will have a much stronger impact,” said State Sen. Jake Corman (R., Centre) “Spread it out nationally, and you’re spreading resources so thin that you’re watering down what impact you can have.”

Last week, Corman announced plans to introduce a bill that would require the NCAA to spend all of the endowment money within Pennsylvania’s borders and threatened to sue to bar the association from doling out money until the state legislature has a chance to consider his proposal.

Judging by SI’s report, the NCAA apparently didn’t get around to it. The NCAA established a “task force” last September to determine where the money — Penn State already wrote a $12 million check as part of its five-year schedule for the fine — should be sent.

“The NCAA has determined that at least one-quarter of the annual disbursements from the endowment will be reserved for Pennsylvania organizations,” said a Penn State release. “However, recognizing that child sexual abuse is a national issue, the NCAA has determined that grants from the endowment will be available in other states as well. Penn State appreciates the commitments of the task force on this important endeavor that will help countless victims of child sexual abuse.”

SI’s report also states it’s “unclear if the suit will seek to overturn or reduce the NCAA’s historic penalties against Penn State.” What power the commonwealth would have to assert itself over the NCAA is foggy since the specifics of the reported lawsuit aren’t known.

The NCAA’s dilemma from the moment the Sandusky scandal broke in November, 2011, was how it could get involved, if it could at all. The Association has no authority over state or federal investigations and the alleged cover-up of Sandusky’s pedophilia by top PSU admins blurred the line in the eyes of many between a crime of the law and a crime of athletic interest. Shortly after the Sandusky story broke, Penn State hired former FBI director Louis Freeh to lead an investigation into the university’s response to the multiple allegations against Sandusky.

It was that report, released in July of last year, which the NCAA used to grant unprecedented power to Emmert to punish PSU with penalties that included the aforementioned fine, loss of scholarship and a multi-year bowl ban. The NCAA has stated multiple times that those sanctions are not subject to appeal.

However, the NCAA can still be sued for its methods, which have come under fire for bypassing normal investigative protocol  How the commonwealth plans to pursue a suit remains to be seen.

Can Mike Sinlgetary save Baylor football?

WACO, TX - AUGUST 31:  A general view of play between the Southern Methodist Mustangs and the Baylor Bears at McLane Stadium on August 31, 2014 in Waco, Texas.  (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)
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In the days after Baylor rocked the football world with the firing of head coach Art Briles amid alarming controversy and the likely intent to wipe the slate clean after getting through the 2016 college football season, there is much anticipation to see who steps in to take over the suddenly startled Baylor football program. Whoever steps in to be the new permanent head coach in the years to come will do so knowing he is taking on an unenviable task at a program that has never had things come served on a silver platter.

Maybe Mike Singletary is just the man for the job?

Singletary’s name has come up at times in the recent days as the guessing game begins for figuring out who takes on the role of head coach of the Bears. Singletary should be Baylor’s next head coach, writes Jarrett Bell for USA Today. He is also already receiving some high praise and a recommendation from another familiar name in the football world, Pro Football Hall of Famer Kellen Winslow.

“Experience. Reputation. Ties to the school. He’s a good fit,” Winslow said. “They need to restore their credibility, as a school and with their football program. To do that, you need to change the whole culture.”

Hiring Singletary would be a drastic change of culture for the Baylor program, which has come under fire for operating under a terribly misguided football culture for the sake of winning games. Singletary is hard-nosed and would set a brand new tone and establish a new order at Baylor. Singletary has never coached in college football but has some experience at the NFL level. The former Super Bowl champion linebacker with the Chicago Bears was a head coach for the San Francisco 49ers for the 2009 and 2010 seasons before being removed in favor of then-Stanford head coach Jim Harbaugh. The majority of Singletary’s coaching career as been filled as an assistant with the Baltimore Ravens, 49ers and Minnesota Vikings.

A Baylor alum and member of both the College Football Hall of Fame and Pro Football Hall of Fame, Singletary would likely be well received by the Baylor community from the start. He would also command a level of respect from day one given his football background, but he would most certainly need a good offensive-minded staff around him to help balance out his defensive focus.

For now, Singletary is sitting on the sideline and hoping his university sorts out its issues to establish a firm path going forward. He has not shut down the idea of being a part of that plan, but he is not actively and publicly throwing himself at the front of the line for an interview.

“The most important thing for me to do is just wait and see what they’re thinking,” Singletary said. “We’ll just have to wait and see.”

Houston wants to keep options open rather than focus just on Big 12

HOUSTON, TX - DECEMBER 05:  Cameron Malveaux #94 of the Houston Cougars and Nick Thurman #91 kiss the AAC championship trophy after defeating the Temple Owls 24-13 at TDECU Stadium on December 5, 2015 in Houston, Texas.  (Photo by Bob Levey/Getty Images)
Photo by Bob Levey/Getty Images
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The University of Houston wants a spot in the Big 12, but it will also look for ways to keep its options open just in case. The Houston Chronicle highlighted the current situation for the Univeristy of Houston as the ongoing Big 12 expansion rumor mill spins, with a few mentions of the Cougars popping up here and there.

“We want Houston to be at the top of that list,” said Hunter Yurachek, Houston’s vice president for intercollegiate athletics. Asked about focusing entirely on the Big 12, Yurachek said “I think that limits us. We have to keep all our options open.”

Aside from potential membership in the Big 12, which appears to be the top goal for Houston, the two other options mentioned by The Houston Chronicle include sticking with the American Athletic Conference and continuing to be a power player in what could be the top non-power conference (with the hope and dream of one day being considered a power conference with a new media deal in the future) or holding out for the Pac-12 in the event the conference wants to set foot in the state of Texas. That last option may be the biggest reach, but a school like Houston would be wise to keep every scenario on the drawing board.

“We’re thinking long term at the University of Houston,” Yurachek explained. “We’re not making these changes for the immediate future. These are investments for anything that can happen in the collegiate landscape, not just any decisions the Big 12 could make in their future meetings.”

If the Big 12 is going to expand, Houston has a good set of pros and cons to consider. Among non-power conference options, Houston is well-positioned for future success in a very attractive media market. Of course, the Big 12 already has a strong presence throughout Texas with the Longhorns. If the purpose is to expand viewership, as seems to be the case with many realignment moves, this is a big drawback for Houston and it is one they cannot overcome. Of course, the Houston market is starting to tune into more SEC football recently with the addition of Texas A&M. Houston could help regain a stronghold for the Big 12 in the Houston market, but then again so could a dominant Texas Longhorns program in all likelihood.

Houston leaders have now reportedly met with leaders at each of the current Big 12 members. It is clear Houston would jump at the opportunity to join the Big 12, just as TCU did after jumping from the Mountain West Conference to the Big East, where the Horned Frogs never played a down before accepting a Big 12 invite.If the Big 12 chooses to expand, which is still no guarantee to happen, Houston has plenty to offer as the program continues to grow.

If the Big 12 chooses to expand, which is still no guarantee to happen, Houston has plenty to offer as the program continues to grow. Whether adding Houston makes sense to the rest of the Big 12 is still up for debate, just as is the possible membership of other options like Cincinnati, UConn, UCF, Memphis and BYU.

Former Texas OL Octavious Bishop joins ‘Horns staff in off-the-field role

Octavious Bishop
Texas athletics
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Former Texas offensive lineman Octavious Bishop has rejoined the program as the Longhorns’ director of student leadership and personal development. The position is a new one, created specifically for Bishop.

Texas’s release announcing his hire says Bishop will work with Charlie Strong and the UT football staff to “provide strategy and implementation of programs to support student-athlete development. Among the program’s goals and objectives will be personal growth, character enhancement, leadership assessment and development, life skills and career preparation.”

“I had an unbelievable conversation with Octavious about what we were looking for in this position and knew right away that he was the man for the job,” Strong said in a statement. “He’s an engaging and energetic person who has a ton of experience working with personal development and has gained so much knowledge in handling all aspects of student-athletes’ lives. I just really loved his passion and all of the ideas he was bringing to the table. On top of that, he’s a Longhorn letterman who overcame a lot of obstacles in his own life. I’m so excited to have him joining our staff.”

Bishop is a former three-year starter at left tackle for the Longhorns, best known as one of the road graders for Ricky Williams‘s NCAA record-breaking 1998 Heisman Trophy campaign. Bishop played professionally for the Oakland Raiders, Atlanta Falcons as well as in NFL Europe and the XFL before returning to Texas to finish his social work degree in 2001. He’s since earned his Master’s degree in social work from UT and is currently a Ph.D. candidate at Walden University in Minnesota. He has work experience as a social worker and counselor, dealing with marriage, family and addiction counseling and working with students with mental health needs.

“Many of the student-athletes who will attend The University of Texas come from backgrounds similar to my own,” Bishop said. “I have a unique perspective, as a former player and student, that many of them will share. The relationships I’ve established outside of football have played a profound role in my professional and personal development.”

SEC to discuss expanding restriction on transfers

Nick Saban
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A year ago, the SEC adopted a rule banning its member schools from accepting transfers who were disciplined at their previous institution for sexual assault or other forms of sexual violence. The rule came about after Alabama accepted a transfer from Georgia defensive lineman Jonathan Taylor, whom Mark Richt dismissed after he was arrested for domestic violence, only to see him again be arrested for domestic violence in Tuscaloosa. Chalk that entire episode up as just another way Nick Saban has changed the way the SEC conducts business.

Now the league is considering expanding the ban to other forms of misconduct in advance of its annual spring meetings in Destin, Fla.

According to the Athens Banner-Herald, a student-athlete working group has recommended expanding the rule to “bar transfers who were convicted of, pled guilty or no contest to a serious misconduct felony.”

“The rule that was passed at the last spring meeting was a first step,” SEC associate commissioner for legal affairs and compliance William King told the paper. “I think commissioner (Greg) Sankey made that clear from the beginning that this was a first step and that the conference would revisit the rule.”

The Big 12 and Pac-12 adopted similar rules to mimic the SEC, and it’s likely this policy will only see stronger teeth considering it was his practice of accepting players with violent pasts from other schools that led to Art Briles‘ eventual ouster.

The rule removes the incentive for coaches who fear that dismissing troubled players will only see them on the opposite sideline a season or two later.

SEC schools are expected to conduct background inquiries into all transfers, and a loophole exists for schools to appeal to the conference’s executive committee. Many believe the rule banning transfers will eventually apply to incoming freshmen as well, though that does not appear to be on the table for this year.